Default Fellow

Barry Naughton

Biography: 

Barry Naughton is an economist who specializes in China's transitional economy. He has written on economic policy-making in China, and issues relating to industry, foreign trade, macroeconomics and regional development in China. Naughton teaches at the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies of the University of California at San Diego. In 1998, he was named the first So Kuanlok Professor of Chinese and International Affairs, and he currently (2001–2002) serves as Associate Dean. His study of Chinese economic reform, Growing Out of the Plan: Chinese Economic Reform, 1978–1993 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995) won the Masayoshi Ohira Memorial Prize. His research on economic interactions among China, Taiwan and Hong Kong, focusing on the electronics industry, led to the edited volume The China Circle: Economics and Technology in the PRC, Taiwan and Hong Kong (Brooking Institution, 1997).

Filter By:

Topic

Recent Commentary

Economic Policy

The General Secretary’s Extended Reach: Xi Jinping Combines Economics and Politics

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Monday, September 11, 2017

Xi Jinping has seized the initiative in economic policy, making himself the dominant actor in financial regulation and environmental policy, among other areas. 

Economic Policy

The Regulatory Storm: A Surprising Turn in Financial Policy

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Thursday, May 25, 2017

A surprisingly strong and concerted regulatory effort is shaking up the Chinese financial sector. 

Economic Policy

Xi Jinping’s Economic Policy in the Run-up to the 19th Party Congress: The Gift from Donald Trump

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, February 14, 2017

In the run-up to the 19th Party Congress in the fall of 2017, Xi Jinping has a strong interest in sustaining three narratives: the Chinese economy is growing stably, economic reform is moving forward, and a rising China is playing a more important role on the global scene.

Wuhan, China
Economic Policy

Supply-Side Structural Reform at Mid-year: Compliance, Initiative, and Unintended Consequences

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Implementation of supply-side reforms has now passed to provincial governments.

Economic Policy

Two Trains Running: Supply-Side Reform, SOE Reform and the Authoritative Personage

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, July 19, 2016

The publication of a new article by “Authoritative Personage” on May 9, 2016, threw into the open two unresolved issues of Chinese policy: Who is making economic reform policy?  What is the mix between reform and growth? 

Economic Policy

Supply-side Structural Reform: Policy-makers Look For a Way Out

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Policy-making with respects to economic reform has been extremely inconsistent since early 2015.

Economic PolicyAnalysis and Commentary

Reform Agenda In Turmoil: Can Policy-Makers Regain The Initiative?

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Wednesday, September 9, 2015

The stock market turmoil in China revealed a certain amount of disarray in the top-down economic policy process designed by the Third Plenum. 

Economic Policy

Local Debt Restructuring: A Case of Ongoing Authoritarian Reform

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Local debt restructuring is a key part of the ambitious fiscal reforms proposed by Minister of Finance Lou Jiwei. 

Economic Policy

Is There a “Xi Model” of Economic Reform?--Acceleration of Economic Reform since Fall 2014

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Thursday, March 19, 2015

China’s economic reform took major steps forward beginning in the fourth quarter of 2014.

Economic PolicyIn the News

It’s All in the Execution: Struggling with the Reform Agenda

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, October 21, 2014

China’s authoritative leadership small groups have met and struggled to define priorities within China’s broad reform agenda.  

Pages