Henry I. Miller

Robert Wesson Fellow in Scientific Philosophy and Public Policy
Biography: 

Henry I. Miller, MS, MD, is the Robert Wesson Fellow in Scientific Philosophy and Public Policy at the Hoover Institution. His research focuses on public policy toward science and technology, encompassing a number of areas, including pharmaceutical development, genetic engineering in agriculture, models for regulatory reform, and the emergence of new viral diseases.

Miller served for fifteen years at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in a number of posts. He was the medical reviewer for the first genetically engineered drugs to be evaluated by the FDA and thus instrumental in the rapid licensing of human insulin and human growth hormone. Thereafter, he was a special assistant to the FDA commissioner and the founding director of the FDA's Office of Biotechnology. During his government service, Miller participated frequently on various expert and policy panels as a representative of the FDA or the US government. As a government official, Miller received numerous awards and citations.

Since coming to the Hoover Institution, Miller has become well known not only for his contributions to scholarly journals but also for his articles and books that make science, medicine, and technology accessible. His work has been widely published in many languages. Monographs include Policy Controversy in Biotechnology: An Insider's View; To America's Health: A Model for Reform of the Food and Drug Administration; and The Frankenfood Myth: How Protest and Politics Threaten the Biotech Revolution. Barron's selected The Frankenfood Myth as one of the 25 Best Books of 2004. In addition, Miller has published extensively in a wide spectrum of scholarly journals and popular publications worldwide, including The Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, Science, the Nature family of journals, Chronicle of Higher Education, Forbes, National Review, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, the Guardian, Defining Ideas, and the Financial Times. He is a regulator contributor to Forbes.com and frequently appears on the nationally syndicated radio programs of John Batchelor and Lars Larson.

Miller was selected by the editors of Nature Biotechnology as one of the people who had made the "most significant contributions" to biotechnology during the previous decade. He serves on numerous editorial boards.

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Recent Commentary

Farmers: Beware Drought, Pestilence, and the EPA

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

On the one hand, the federal government provides farmers with subsidies worth billions every year. On the other, it imposes arcane, burdensome regulations on the development of new crops, costing farmers billions every year. Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller explains how the government giveth and the government taketh away.

Choke Hold

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

The biotech industry is choking on FDA regulations. Hoover Fellow Henry I. Miller attempts a Heimlich maneuver.

Sick Process

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Who would have thought that American bureaucrats could learn about efficiency from . . . European bureaucrats? Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller explains why the Food and Drug Administration should imitate its counterpart in London.

The Battle over the Battle of the Bulge

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

A new fat-free cooking oil called olestra could radically reduce fat consumption in American diets. Why is the government restricting its use? Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller reports.

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Brave New Beauty

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Advances in genetic engineering may make it possible for people to alter their genetic structure for purely cosmetic purposes. Should the government intervene? Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller thinks not.

March of the Troglodytes

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Scientific illiterates are attempting to bury biotechnology. By Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller.

The Rising Cost of Getting Well

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Regulation by the Food and Drug Administration is pushing up the price of medicine and delaying the introduction of new drugs. Think the era of big government is over? Look in your medicine cabinet. By Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller, M.D.

State Department Goes Green

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, October 30, 1997

American soldiers being sent overseas to combat . . . noxious emissions? According to a new State Department document, the notion isn't as far fetched as it sounds. Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller, M.D., examines the latest wrinkle in the administration's foreign policy.

Two Myths about Biotechnology

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

Biotechnology is already responsible for products ranging from new medicines to genetically engineered tomatoes, yet the very idea of tinkering with genetic material makes millions of Americans nervous. Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller says we can relax.

A Big Fat Problem

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

A quarter of a century after Procter & Gamble developed the fat substitute olestra, the Food and Drug Administration finally approved it. Now a group associated with Ralph Nader, the Center for Science in the Public Interest, is accusing the FDA of beinga corporate lapdog. Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller details an absurdity.

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