Mei Gechlik

Biography: 

Mei Gechlik is founder and director of the China Guiding Cases Project (CGCP) at Stanford Law School.  Formerly a tenured professor in Hong Kong, she founded the CGCP in February 2011.  With support from an international team of nearly 200 members and an advisory board of approximately fifty distinguished experts, including justices from the US Supreme Court and China’s Supreme People’s Court, the CGCP has quickly become the premier source of analyses of Guiding Cases, China’s de facto binding case law (http://cgc.law.stanford.edu).  The CGCP has presented at several notable forums, including the World Bank, the Open Government Partnership Global Summit, and a US–China Legal Exchange Conference.  From 2001 to 2005,  Gechlik worked for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, a Washington, DC–based think tank, testifying before the US Congress on various topics about China.  Gechlik is admitted as a barrister in England, Wales, and Hong Kong and is a member of the bar in New York and the District of Columbia.  She received her doctorate in the science of law from Stanford Law School and her MBA in finance from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Analysis and Commentary

Appropriate Norms Of State Behavior In Cyberspace: Governance In China And Opportunities For US Businesses

by Mei Gechlikvia Lawfare
Monday, July 31, 2017

Last week the Hoover Institution published my paper —entitled "Appropriate Norms Of State Behavior In Cyberspace: Governance In China And Opportunities For US Businesses"—as part of its Aegis Paper Series. 

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Appropriate Norms Of State Behavior In Cyberspace: Governance In China And Opportunities For US Businesses

by Mei Gechlikvia Aegis Paper Series
Thursday, July 27, 2017

Finding cybernorms that are acceptable to the United States and China, which have different ideologies and practices as well as enormous interests at stake, is challenging. This article identifies these developments in China - the new Guiding Cases System as well as foreign and domestic developments regarding facilitating everyone’s access to cyberspace - and discusses how they, together with the Shanghai Cooperation Organization’s growing significance in the international arena, call for more strategic thinking among US policymakers so that the United States can seize the new opportunities to engage meaningfully with China in establishing international norms for cyberspace.