Morris P. Fiorina

Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
American Academy of Political and Social Science
National Academy of Sciences
Biography: 

Morris P. Fiorina is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Wendt Family Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. His current research focuses on elections and public opinion with particular attention to the quality of representation: how well the positions of elected officials reflect the preferences of the public.

During the course of his forty-year career Fiorina has published numerous articles and books on national politics including Congress—Keystone of the Washington Establishment (Yale University Press, 1977), Retrospective Voting in American National Elections (Yale University Press, 1981), and Divided Government (Allyn & Bacon, 1992). The Personal Vote: Constituency Service and Electoral Independence, coauthored with Bruce Cain and John Ferejohn (Harvard University Press, 1987), won the 1988 Richard F. Fenno Prize. He is also coeditor of Continuity and Change in House Elections (Stanford University Press and Hoover Press, 2000). The third edition of his 2004 groundbreaking book Culture War: The Myth of a Polarized America (with Samuel J. Abrams and Jeremy C. Pope) was published in 2011. Most recently he coedited Can We Talk? The Rise of Rude, Nasty, Stubborn Politics (Pearson, 2013).

Fiorina has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. He has served on the editorial boards of more than a dozen journals on political science, law, political economy, and public policy. From 1986 to 1990 he was chairman of the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies.

Fiorina received his BA degree from Allegheny College and his MA and PhD from the University of Rochester. He lives in Portola Valley, California.

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Recent Commentary

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The 2016 Presidential Election—Identities, Class, And Culture

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Essays on Contemporary American Politics
Thursday, June 22, 2017

In the aggregate the 2016 election returns were similar to those in 2012, but the consequences of the voting were dramatically different. This contrast highlights the fact that in a majoritarian system like that in the United States minor changes in the vote can produce major changes in government control and the public policies that result. Looking ahead, perhaps the most significant feature of the 2016 voting was the reappearance of anti-establishment “populist” sentiments that are roiling the politics of other advanced democracies.

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Making Sense Of Trump's Win

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Defining Ideas (Hoover Institution)
Thursday, May 4, 2017

It's clear that voters supported the Republican despite, not because of, his incendiary positions. 

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The 2016 Presidential Election—An Abundance Of Controversies

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Essays on Contemporary American Politics
Tuesday, April 18, 2017

As the polls universally predicted, Hillary Clinton won the popular vote. But contrary to universally held expectations, Donald Trump shocked the political world by breaching the Democrats “blue wall” and winning a majority of the Electoral College.

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A Historical Perspective

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Essays on Contemporary American Politics
Wednesday, November 2, 2016

In the first essay of this series I pointed out that contemporary electoral instability resembles the electorally chaotic late nineteenth century period after the return of the Confederate states to the Union.

American Flags
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Is The US Experience Exceptional?

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Essays on Contemporary American Politics
Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Research by European scholars clearly answers yes. Their studies paint a picture that is the mirror image of that in the United States. The political class in European democracies is depolarizing and/or de-sorting.

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The Nationalization Of Congressional Elections

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Defining Ideas (Hoover Institution)
Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Today, people vote for a party rather than a person. Is that a good thing? 

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The (Re)Nationalization Of Congressional Elections

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Essays on Contemporary American Politics
Wednesday, October 19, 2016

In the second half of the twentieth century, elections for the presidency, House, and Senate exhibited a great deal of independence, but the outcomes of congressional elections today are much more closely aligned with those of presidential elections.

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Independents: The Marginal Members Of An Electoral Coalition

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Essays on Contemporary American Politics
Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Currently, the party balance in the United States is nearly even, roughly one-third Democratic, one-third Republican, and one-third independent, taking turnout into account.

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The Temptation To Overreach

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Essays on Contemporary American Politics
Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Today’s parties succumb to the temptation to overreach when in control of an institution. By overreach I mean simply that they attempt to govern in a manner that alienates the marginal members of their electoral majority.

Political dialogue, Andrzej Dudzinski
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Party Sorting And Democratic Politics

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Essays on Contemporary American Politics
Wednesday, September 28, 2016

This essay is more qualitative than the two previous data-heavy essays. It considers the larger consequences of party sorting for the conduct of American politics.

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