R. Glenn Hubbard

R. Glenn Hubbard

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Biography: 

R. Glenn Hubbard is the dean of Columbia University Business School, where he is also the Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics, and a member of the Working Group on Health Care Policy. Hubbard has been at Columbia University since 1988; he has been a visiting professor at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and Harvard Business School, as well as the University of Chicago. He served as deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Treasury Department for Tax Policy from 1991 to 1993. From February 2001 until March 2003, he was chairman of the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers, at which time he also chaired the Economic Policy Committee of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). He is currently a director of ADP, BlackRock Closed-End Funds, KKR Financial Corporation, and Met Life. Hubbard received his BA and BS degrees summa cum laude from the University of Central Florida and holds AM and PhD degrees in economics from Harvard University.

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Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

How The U.S. Can Return To 4% Growth

by R. Glenn Hubbard, Kevin M. Warshvia The Wall Street Journal
Sunday, June 21, 2015

Short-term policy gimmicks need to be set aside in favor of longer-term tax and regulatory reforms.

Lincoln Memorial
Analysis and Commentary

Abraham Lincoln's War On Inequality

by R. Glenn Hubbard, Timothy Kanevia Real Clear Politics
Sunday, April 12, 2015

Abraham Lincoln would be embarrassed about the polarization of U.S. politics today, 150 years after his assassination. Make no mistake, Lincoln was a polarizing president.

Analysis and Commentary

Economic Quagmire And Opportunity

by Timothy Kane, R. Glenn Hubbardvia Real Clear Politics
Friday, April 10, 2015

Abraham Lincoln would be embarrassed about the polarization of U.S. politics today. He is remembered as the president who emancipated America’s slaves and won America’s bitter Civil War, then martyred on April 15, 1865, one hundred and fifty years ago.

Balance

Balance: The Economics of Great Powers from Ancient Rome to Modern America

by R. Glenn Hubbard, Timothy Kanevia Simon & Schuster
Tuesday, May 21, 2013

In this groundbreaking book, two economists explain why economic imbalances cause civil collapse— and why the United States could be next.

Free-Market Medicine

by John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Digest
Monday, August 13, 2012

A simple treatment for soaring costs and infectious bureaucracy. By John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, and Daniel P. Kessler.

Analysis and Commentary

The Wrong Remedy for Health Care

by John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, Daniel P. Kesslervia Wall Street Journal
Friday, June 29, 2012

The Affordable Care Act will exacerbate the problems with our current health-care system. Fortunately, market reforms are still possible...

Analysis and Commentary

What a Romney Recovery Might Look Like

by R. Glenn Hubbardvia Wall Street Journal
Thursday, June 7, 2012

Given last week's grim jobs report, it's now clearer than ever that the November election will be a referendum on the economy...

Analysis and Commentary

It's Still Possible to Cut Spending: Here's How

by R. Glenn Hubbardvia Wall Street Journal
Wednesday, November 23, 2011

The obvious place to begin is the repeal of ObamaCare. We also need to empower the states, streamline the federal government and modernize Medicare and Social Security...

It's Still Possible to Cut Spending: Here's How

by R. Glenn Hubbardvia Advancing a Free Society
Wednesday, November 23, 2011

After two months of talks, the super committee announced failure on Monday to agree on reducing federal deficits by $1.2 trillion over the next decade. But as the late economist Herb Stein once remarked: If something cannot go on forever, it won't.

Doctored Numbers

Doctored Numbers

by John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 13, 2011

The key justification for ObamaCare is “cost shifting”—that the insured pay a hidden tax to support the uninsured. But for the most part, such a shift does not, in fact, take place. By John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, and Daniel P. Kessler.

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