Reuel Marc Gerecht

Reuel Marc Gerecht

Biography: 

Reuel Marc Gerecht is a senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies specializing in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Islamic militancy, and terrorism. His most recent publication is The Wave: Man, God, and the Ballot Box in the Middle East (Hoover Institution Press, 2011). Other books include A Spy's Journey into Revolutionary Iran and The Islamic Paradox. Gerecht was a case officer in the Central Intelligence Agency's Clandestine Service focusing on the Middle East. Previously, he was a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and the director of the Middle East Initiative at the Project for New American Century. Gerecht is a graduate of Johns Hopkins, Edinburgh, and Princeton Universities.

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Recent Commentary

Aux Armes!

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 20, 2015

The French are now on the front lines of the struggle against radical Islam. Can they hold it back?

The Palestinian People
Analysis and Commentary

A Ballot-Box Test for the Palestinians

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia Wall Street Journal
Thursday, August 14, 2014

It has become de rigueur among Israelis, and many Americans, to belittle the idea of Palestinian democracy. The 2006 legislative elections—strongly backed by President George W. Bush and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas —produced a narrow victory by Hamas, an Islamist terrorist organization, setting off a long slide for the more secular Fatah. Fatah is the muscle behind the Palestinian Authority, the government on the West Bank.

The Road to Damascus

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Passivity toward Syria isn’t buying the United States time. It’s permitting forces that oppose us and our values to strengthen and coalesce.

Analysis and Commentary

The Case for Stronger Sanctions on Iran

by Reuel Marc Gerecht, Mark Dubowitzvia Wall Street Journal
Sunday, November 10, 2013

Was the deal that Iran came close to negotiating with six world powers in Geneva over the weekend likely to keep Tehran from developing a nuclear weapon?

Analysis and Commentary

The Next Breeding Ground for Global Jihad

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia Wall Street Journal
Monday, October 7, 2013

When President Obama declared that Syrian dictator Bashar Assad must "step aside" two years ago, many believed that it was only a matter of time before the U.S. intervened on behalf of the rebels battling the regime. Now that seems increasingly out of the question.

Analysis and Commentary

The Caravan: Not Really About Syria

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia Advancing a Free Society
Monday, September 23, 2013

The Geneva Syrian talks, like the President’s speech on Syria, have left out many things, but most importantly several inescapable truths about this conflict:

Syria

Not Really About Syria

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia The Caravan
Thursday, September 12, 2013

The Geneva Syrian talks, like the President’s speech on Syria, have left out many things, but most importantly several inescapable truths about this conflict:

Analysis and Commentary

The Caravan: An Islamist Moment?

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia Advancing a Free Society
Monday, August 5, 2013

Fifty years ago, the historian Elizabeth Monroe published a beautifully written book with a dismissive title:  Britain’s Moment in the Middle East, 1914-1956.  Although one can quibble with the description—the Britis

Egyptian Coup

An Islamist Moment?

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia The Caravan
Monday, August 5, 2013

Fifty years ago, the historian Elizabeth Monroe published a beautifully written book with a dismissive title:  Britain’s Moment in the Middle East, 1914-1956.  Although one can quibble with the description—the British impact in the region really should be clocked from A

Analysis and Commentary

Egypt's Islamists Will Rise Again

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia Wall Street Journal
Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Fifty years ago, the historian Elizabeth Monroe published a beautifully written book with a dismissive title, "Britain's Moment in the Middle East, 1914-1956." She captured well the British interlude between two more culturally transformative powers: the Ottoman Empire and sec

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