Timothy Kane

Research Fellow
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Biography: 

Tim Kane is an economist and research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. Previously, he was the chief economist at the Hudson Institute in Washington, DC. In addition to senior research roles at the Kauffman Foundation and the Heritage Foundation, Kane has served twice as a senior economist at the Joint Economic Committee of the US Congress.

Kane has published scholarly research on diverse topics, including job creation by start-ups, economic growth, US politics, foreign affairs, and national security. Dozens of media outlets have cited his research, including the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and the New York Times. He has provided commentary for ABC, CBS, CNN, C-SPAN, FOX News, National Public Radio, WSJ Opinion Journal, and Bloomberg TV.

From 1995 to 2001, Kane cofounded multiple software firms in San Diego. His start-up enonymous.com received venture funding and was awarded “software start-up of the year” in 1999. Kane remains an active entrepreneur, investor, and mentor.

From 1990 to 1995, Kane served as an air force officer with two tours of duty overseas. He was stationed in Seoul, South Korea, and in Tokyo, Japan, and worked closely with allied forces in both countries.

In 2012, Kane authored Bleeding Talent (Palgrave MacMillan), about leadership in the US military that has been favorably reviewed by the New York Times, Joint Forces Quarterly, and National Review. He is working on a research project to expound on the idea of a total volunteer force for the US military.

Kane’s most recent book is Balance: The Economics of Great Powers from Ancient Rome to Modern America (Simon and Schuster), coauthored with Glenn Hubbard. Kane and Hubbard blog at www.balanceofeconomics.com.

Kane earned a PhD in economics from UC San Diego. He is also a graduate of the US Air Force Academy. He currently lives in Palo Alto, California, with his wife, Hiromi, and their children.

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Recent Commentary

Don’t Retreat on the Draft

by Timothy Kanevia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 20, 2015

The Pentagon may need reforms, but return to conscription? That would be double marching in the wrong direction.

Lincoln Memorial
Featured Commentary

Abraham Lincoln's War On Inequality

by R. Glenn Hubbard, Timothy Kanevia Real Clear Politics
Sunday, April 12, 2015

Abraham Lincoln would be embarrassed about the polarization of U.S. politics today, 150 years after his assassination. Make no mistake, Lincoln was a polarizing president.

Featured Commentary

Economic Quagmire And Opportunity

by Timothy Kane, R. Glenn Hubbardvia Real Clear Politics
Friday, April 10, 2015

Abraham Lincoln would be embarrassed about the polarization of U.S. politics today. He is remembered as the president who emancipated America’s slaves and won America’s bitter Civil War, then martyred on April 15, 1865, one hundred and fifty years ago.

Blogs

Promethean America

by Timothy Kanevia The Weekly Standard
Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Can you kill your way to victory? Yes, if you are engaged in a hot war against a conventional enemy. Yes, too, if you face homicidal extremists. Killing them may be the only option. Indeed, death is the essential dimension of warfare.

US flag on military helmet
Blogs

Military Retirement: Too Sweet A Deal?

by Timothy Kanevia War on the Rocks
Monday, March 2, 2015

Retiring from the U.S. military is a sweet deal for the 17 percent of veterans who are allowed to serve for twenty years on active duty. Too sweet.

The Entrepreneurial Decision: A Two-System Survey of D.C. Food-Truck Owners

by Timothy Kane
Tuesday, February 24, 2015

With continued weakness in the U.S. economy in recent years, the status of entrepreneurship is increasingly seen as vital to recovery. However, the decline in rates of entrepreneurship over the past four decades raises important research questions. What motivates an individual worker to choose entrepreneurship over employment?

Immigration
New IdeasFeatured Commentary

The Economic Effect Of Immigration

by Timothy Kanevia Peregrine
Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Critics of the president’s executive actions on immigration reform go too far when they claim that immigrants are harmful to the US economy. Simplistic appeals to economic logic, gilded with nativist assumptions, hint that the arrival of millions of immigrant workers cannot help but compete for a finite number of American-based jobs.

Survey Results

Letter from the Editor

by Timothy Kanevia Peregrine
Thursday, February 5, 2015

Two weeks after the midterm election of 2014, President Obama announced a series of executive actions on immigration policy in a fifteen-minute televised speech from the White House. The centerpiece was announcing “deferred action” for up to five million undocumented immigrant adults, including work permits and drivers’ licenses for those who register.

Featured Commentary

For the Coming Recession, Hope For the Best, Prepare For the Worst

by Timothy Kanevia Real Clear Markets
Wednesday, February 4, 2015

The Great Recession started seven years ago (December 2007). It seems hard to believe, but could America already be overdue for another? The recently released employment data for December 2014 marks seven years since the prior peak, or 84 months. This is worth noting because the average duration of U.S. business cycles since 1854 is 56.4 months, or just under five years. That's two recession per decade.

Featured Commentary

Free Soldiers Make a Free Nation

by Timothy Kanefeaturing Martin Andersonvia Commentary
Wednesday, January 7, 2015

The godfather of the All-Volunteer military, Martin Anderson, died a few days ago at the age of 78. Anderson was a colleague of mine at the Hoover Institution, but he was working to end the draft before most of us were born.

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