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Analysis and Commentary

It May Be Harder To Become A Transformational Leader Than To Get Into Harvard

by John E. Chubbvia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Friday, November 14, 2014

Traditional principal preparation programs are notoriously non-selective. The new breed of program takes selectivity to the opposite extreme. Some have ratios of acceptances to inquiries or applications that rival competitive colleges—below 10 percent.

In the News

Closing The Racial Achievement Gap Could Expand America's Economy By Trillions

quoting Eric Hanushekvia Huffington Post
Wednesday, November 12, 2014

The gap in educational achievement between white students and students of color could be costing the nation trillions of dollars, according to a new report.

In the News

Getting More Poor Kids into College Won’t Fix Income Inequality

quoting Caroline M. Hoxbyvia Washington Post
Thursday, October 23, 2014

If you want to address income inequality, fix higher education. That seems to be the current thinking in Washington, where President Obama has urged college administrators to better serve low-income students.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The State of Education Reform

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Defining Ideas
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Though amazing progress has been over the past three decades, we need to do more. 

In the News

Teaching Reform

mentioning Terry M. Moevia National Review Online
Friday, October 10, 2014

Those who fear that the big problem with America’s schools is the teachers who work in them would be heartened by spending a little time at an Educators 4 Excellence (E4E) conclave. Sydney Morris and Evan Stone launched Educators 4 Excellence in 2010 to push unions and schools to get serious about recognizing excellence and addressing mediocrity.

Analysis and Commentary

Time for a Reboot

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via National Review Online
Monday, October 6, 2014

Americans are ambivalent about testing, standards, and accountability in their children’s schools. This is clear from survey results that swing wildly depending on how, exactly, the question is phrased — and on whether the practice in question might inconvenience one’s own kid, as apart from “fixing those awful schools across town.”

In the News

The University of Chicago Tries to Catch Up on Economic Diversity

mentioning Caroline M. Hoxbyvia New York Times
Wednesday, October 1, 2014

The University of Chicago announced a significant new program Wednesday to recruit more low-income students and to help them while on campus. The university said it would replace loans for needy students with grants and eliminate the application fee for lower-income students, among other measures.

In the News

School Spending by Affluent Is Widening Wealth Gap

quoting John E. Chubbvia ABC News
Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Education is supposed to help bridge the gap between the wealthiest people and everyone else. Ask the experts, and they'll count the ways:

In the News

The Geography of College Opportunity

mentioning Caroline M. Hoxbyvia National Journal
Thursday, September 25, 2014

Amanda Hinchman-Dominguez isn't the typical American college student. She's enrolled in an institution that's more than 1,300 miles away from where her family lives. She's living on campus, in a dorm. And she's attending a small, private liberal-arts college.

Analysis and Commentary

Getting Our History Right

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Frederick M. Hessvia National Review Online
Tuesday, September 23, 2014

The College Board’s new framework for teaching Advanced Placement U.S. History has become a flashpoint in the education debate. Much of the criticism is hysterical and inaccurate . . . but not all of it. The critics make a legitimate case that the framework is ideologically slanted and infused with 21st-century progressivist bias.

Pages

Williamson M. Evers

Evers featured as the author of the “Quote of the Week”

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

“There is no constitutional or statutory basis for national standards, national assessments, or national curricula. The two testing consortia funded by the US Department of Education have already expanded their activities well beyond the limits of the law.”

Bill Evers, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and member of the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, was featured as the author of the “Quote of the Week” in the Heritage Foundation’s weekly digest, Education Notebook. The digest highlights developments in education policy.

News
Choice and Federalism: Defining the Federal Role in Education

Reboot Federal Role in K–12 Education, Hoover Task Force Says

Monday, February 6, 2012
Stanford

With the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act overdue for reauthorization, the Hoover Institution’s Koret Task Force on K-12 Education recommends a new and powerful strategy for fundamental education reform—and a major makeover of the customary federal role: allow states receiving federal funding to opt out of traditional federal constraints if they create vibrant marketplaces for informed school choice.

Press Releases
Best and Worst in American Education, 2011

Hoover Institution Experts Identify 2011’s Best and Worst Education Events

Monday, November 28, 2011

In an effort to inform the public and shape education reform in the upcoming year, scholars on the Hoover Institution’s Koret Task Force on K-12 Education today released their annual list of the top five best and top five worst events in American education in 2011. Their list indicates that several positive developments led to greater parental choice, system transparency and teacher accountability; however, “the worst” events indicate that there remains considerable room for improvement.

Click here to read the full press release.

Click here to read the best and worst events in American education in 2011.

News
Cory Booker, mayor of Newark, New Jersey

Mayor Booker Consults with Hoover and Stanford Scholars on Education Reform

Friday, October 21, 2011

Cory A. Booker, mayor of Newark, New Jersey, and Stanford alum (BA class of 1991; MA class of 1992) participated in a roundtable discussion with Hoover Institution and Stanford University scholars on Friday, October 21, 2011, on the importance of education reform in the Newark area and throughout the state. As a member of the Newark Municipal Council and since being elected mayor in 2006, Booker has been an outspoken education advocate.

News
Williamson M. Evers

Evers moderates K–12 Education Forum Workshop

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Bill Evers, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Institution’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, will moderate a workshop on K–12 education at the California Republican Party convention workshop series on September 17, 2011. The workshop will discuss education issues in California, including testing and accountability, curriculum, charter schools and open enrollment, and teachers’ unions. Click here for more information about the event.

News
Terry M. Moe

Klein reviews Steven Brill and Terry Moe’s books on reforming public education

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Joel Klein, executive vice president at News Corp. and CEO of the company's education division and former chancellor of the New York City public schools (2002–10), reviewed two publications by Steven Brill, a well-known journalist, and Hoover fellow Terry M. Moe, a member of the Institution's Koret Task Force on K–12 education at the Hoover Institution and the William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science at Stanford University.

News

Hoover Fellows' New Website Liberating Learning Educates Public on the Growing Role of Technology in K–12 Education

Monday, September 6, 2010

The beginning of a new school year evokes memories of many classrooms with neatly ordered desks, dusty chalkboards, and a teacher standing at a lectern taking attendance.

News
Williamson M. Evers

Hoover fellow appointed to Academic Content Standards Commission

Monday, June 7, 2010

Bill Evers, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Institution’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, has been appointed to the California Academic Content Standards Commission by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. The commission evaluates the national Common Core State Standards for statewide adoption and makes recommendations to the California State Board of Education on any adjustments to ensure that California’s rigorous standards are maintained.

News
Paul Hill and Paul Peterson, Hoover fellows and members of the K-12 Education Task Force, discussed their newest books

School choice: From theory to action

Wednesday, May 5, 2010

Paul Hill and Paul Peterson, Hoover fellows and members of the K-12 Education Task Force, discussed their latest books (Learning as We Go: Why School Choice is Worth the Wait by Hill and Saving Schools: From Horace Mann to Virtual Learning by Peterson) with members of the education policy community in Washington D.C. Cosponsored by the Hoover Institution and the American Enterprise Institute, the event was held at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute.

News
American Education in 2030

Hoover’s Education Task Force Releases E-Book That Looks Ahead

Wednesday, April 28, 2010
Stanford

Ranging far afield from its usual analytic research, the Hoover Institution’s Koret Task Force on K-12 Education today released a new e-book, American Education 2030. This e-book takes a peek at what American education will look like by 2030—when today’s babies will be in college and entering the workforce.

Press Releases

Pages

The K–12 Education Task Force focuses on education policy as it relates to government provision and oversight versus private solutions (both within and outside the public school system) that stress choice, accountability, and transparency; that include systematic reform options such as vouchers, charter schools, and testing; and that weigh equity concerns against outcome objectives.

Its collaborative efforts spawned a quarterly journal titled Education Next, one of the premier publications on public education research policy in the nation.

Chester E. Finn, Jr. serves as chair of the Task Force on K–12 education.