K-12 Education Task Force

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Other Media

A Bad Week For Common Core

quoting Paul E. Petersonvia Politico
Wednesday, August 20, 2014

This has not been a great week for the Common Core. Two new national polls, released Wednesday and Tuesday, found the public souring on the academic standards, which are meant to elevate math, reading and writing instruction across the nation. One of the polls, conducted by the journal Education Next, also found a steep plunge in support for the standards among public school teachers.

Other Media

Poll: Common Core Support Among Teachers Plummets, With Fewer Than Half Supporting It

quoting Paul E. Petersonvia The Washington Post
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Anybody watching the escalating battle across the country over the Common Core State Standards and aligned standardized testing will hardly be surprised by a new national poll which reveals a significant loss of support over the last year — especially among teachers, whose approval rating dropped from 76 percent  in 2013 to only  46 percent in 2014. Overall support for the Core dropped from 65 percent last year to 53 percent in 2014, with most of the defection among Republicans.

Other Media

Conservative Study Finds Falling Support for 'Common Core'

featuring Paul E. Petersonvia The Hill
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Public support for Common Core, the Obama administration’s program for setting education standards, has dwindled over the last year, according to a new study from a conservative group. The survey from Education Next, a journal published by the conservative Hoover Institution, found that 53 percent of people still favor Common Core, but the program’s support has declined sharply from 65 percent in 2013.

Blogs

Political Polarization Needlessly Divides the Public on Common Core and NCLB

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Political polarization is making it increasingly difficult to sustain support for policy undertakings that a majority of the public supports. Narrow interest groups and small minorities are twisting public opinion through slogans and rhetoric to which sensation-mongering elements in the media are giving excessive attention. Such is my conclusion after reviewing eight years of Education Next (Ednext) polling on No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Featured Commentary

The Public Turns Against Teacher Tenure

by Paul E. Petersonvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

It's back-to-school season, but teacher tenure has been a hot topic since summer began. In June a California court ruled that the state's tenure and seniority laws are unconstitutional in Vergara v. State of California. Minority students have filed a similar case in New York, with more to come elsewhere.

Blogs

The Hidden Half: School Employees Who Don’t Teach

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Education Next
Friday, August 15, 2014

Why do American public schools spend more of their operating budgets on non-teachers than almost every other country in the world, including nations that are as prosperous and humane as ours? We can’t be certain.

Other Media

Does It Even Matter if Americans Are Terrible At Math?

quoting Eric Hanushekvia Vox
Wednesday, August 13, 2014

If there's one thing Americans know about international tests, it's this: we aren't very good at them. In 2012, the last time 15-year-olds from 65 countries and economies took an international math test, the US ended up ranked far from the top — particularly in math, where they were 27th of 34 countries. (The rankings aren't an exact science; the US could be ranked anywhere between 23rd and 29th, according to the Organization for Economic and Community Development.)

Blogs

Saving Schools—Launching My MOOC on HarvardX

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Monday, August 4, 2014

“Put your money where your mouth is. ”The shibboleth has haunted me since 2010 when I concluded my book Saving Schools with an endorsement of online learning. Using new technologies, students could choose among dozens of options, I said. One great lecturer could teach thousands, even millions, I imagined. Outside experts could view the content, identify weaknesses, propose solutions, I argued.  Continuous improvement would replace the stagnation of the past 50 years of American education, I hoped.

Blogs

Save Our Data! Protect the Integrity of Education Statistics

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Education Next
Monday, August 4, 2014

The possibility that the 113th Congress might yet reauthorize the Institute for Education Sciences (IES)—the House has passed H.R. 4366 and the Senate HELP Committee is cogitating—means it’s time once again to consider the status of the jewel in the IES crown, namely the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).

Featured Commentary

Education Reform in 2014

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Education Next
Friday, August 1, 2014

This short essay cannot begin to say all that deserves to be said about the state of ed-reform in America in 2014, but it gives me an opportunity to do some stocktaking, recount a bit of history, and flag some challenges for the future.

Pages

Best and Worst in American Education, 2011

Hoover Institution Experts Identify 2011’s Best and Worst Education Events

Monday, November 28, 2011

In an effort to inform the public and shape education reform in the upcoming year, scholars on the Hoover Institution’s Koret Task Force on K-12 Education today released their annual list of the top five best and top five worst events in American education in 2011. Their list indicates that several positive developments led to greater parental choice, system transparency and teacher accountability; however, “the worst” events indicate that there remains considerable room for improvement.

Click here to read the full press release.

Click here to read the best and worst events in American education in 2011.

News
Cory Booker, mayor of Newark, New Jersey

Mayor Booker Consults with Hoover and Stanford Scholars on Education Reform

Friday, October 21, 2011

Cory A. Booker, mayor of Newark, New Jersey, and Stanford alum (BA class of 1991; MA class of 1992) participated in a roundtable discussion with Hoover Institution and Stanford University scholars on Friday, October 21, 2011, on the importance of education reform in the Newark area and throughout the state. As a member of the Newark Municipal Council and since being elected mayor in 2006, Booker has been an outspoken education advocate.

News
Williamson M. Evers

Evers moderates K–12 Education Forum Workshop

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Bill Evers, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Institution’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, will moderate a workshop on K–12 education at the California Republican Party convention workshop series on September 17, 2011. The workshop will discuss education issues in California, including testing and accountability, curriculum, charter schools and open enrollment, and teachers’ unions. Click here for more information about the event.

News
Terry M. Moe

Klein reviews Steven Brill and Terry Moe’s books on reforming public education

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Joel Klein, executive vice president at News Corp. and CEO of the company's education division and former chancellor of the New York City public schools (2002–10), reviewed two publications by Steven Brill, a well-known journalist, and Hoover fellow Terry M. Moe, a member of the Institution's Koret Task Force on K–12 education at the Hoover Institution and the William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science at Stanford University.

News

Hoover Fellows' New Website Liberating Learning Educates Public on the Growing Role of Technology in K–12 Education

Monday, September 6, 2010

The beginning of a new school year evokes memories of many classrooms with neatly ordered desks, dusty chalkboards, and a teacher standing at a lectern taking attendance.

News
Williamson M. Evers

Hoover fellow appointed to Academic Content Standards Commission

Monday, June 7, 2010

Bill Evers, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Institution’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, has been appointed to the California Academic Content Standards Commission by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. The commission evaluates the national Common Core State Standards for statewide adoption and makes recommendations to the California State Board of Education on any adjustments to ensure that California’s rigorous standards are maintained.

News
Paul Hill and Paul Peterson, Hoover fellows and members of the K-12 Education Task Force, discussed their newest books

School choice: From theory to action

Wednesday, May 5, 2010

Paul Hill and Paul Peterson, Hoover fellows and members of the K-12 Education Task Force, discussed their latest books (Learning as We Go: Why School Choice is Worth the Wait by Hill and Saving Schools: From Horace Mann to Virtual Learning by Peterson) with members of the education policy community in Washington D.C. Cosponsored by the Hoover Institution and the American Enterprise Institute, the event was held at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute.

News
American Education in 2030

Hoover’s Education Task Force Releases E-Book That Looks Ahead

Wednesday, April 28, 2010
Stanford

Ranging far afield from its usual analytic research, the Hoover Institution’s Koret Task Force on K-12 Education today released a new e-book, American Education 2030. This e-book takes a peek at what American education will look like by 2030—when today’s babies will be in college and entering the workforce.

Press Releases

Media Colloquium on The Economy

Sunday, January 31, 2010
Annenberg Conference Room, Lou Henry Hoover Building

Hoover fellows Robert Hall, Douglas Rivers, Russ Roberts, and John Taylor were the featured speakers at a Media Colloquium hosted by the Hoover Institution. The U.S. economy and the economic stimulus programs were the focus of discussion at the event.

Event
Eric A. Hanushek

International Study Coauthored by Hoover Fellow Eric Hanushek Shows Clear Evidence of Economic Benefits of Educational Improvement

Monday, January 25, 2010
Stanford

Findings from a newly released report, The High Cost of Low Educational Performance: The Long-Run Economic Impact of Improving PISA Outcomes, were presented by Eric Hanushek, a coauthor of the report and the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow in Education at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. . . .

Press Releases

Pages

The K–12 Education Task Force focuses on education policy as it relates to government provision and oversight versus private solutions (both within and outside the public school system) that stress choice, accountability, and transparency; that include systematic reform options such as vouchers, charter schools, and testing; and that weigh equity concerns against outcome objectives.

Its collaborative efforts spawned a quarterly journal titled Education Next, one of the premier publications on public education research policy in the nation.

Chester E. Finn, Jr. serves as chair of the Task Force on K–12 education.