K-12 Education Task Force

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Conservative Study Finds Falling Support for 'Common Core'

featuring Paul E. Petersonvia The Hill
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Public support for Common Core, the Obama administration’s program for setting education standards, has dwindled over the last year, according to a new study from a conservative group. The survey from Education Next, a journal published by the conservative Hoover Institution, found that 53 percent of people still favor Common Core, but the program’s support has declined sharply from 65 percent in 2013.

Blogs

Political Polarization Needlessly Divides the Public on Common Core and NCLB

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Political polarization is making it increasingly difficult to sustain support for policy undertakings that a majority of the public supports. Narrow interest groups and small minorities are twisting public opinion through slogans and rhetoric to which sensation-mongering elements in the media are giving excessive attention. Such is my conclusion after reviewing eight years of Education Next (Ednext) polling on No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Featured Commentary

The Public Turns Against Teacher Tenure

by Paul E. Petersonvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

It's back-to-school season, but teacher tenure has been a hot topic since summer began. In June a California court ruled that the state's tenure and seniority laws are unconstitutional in Vergara v. State of California. Minority students have filed a similar case in New York, with more to come elsewhere.

Blogs

The Hidden Half: School Employees Who Don’t Teach

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Education Next
Friday, August 15, 2014

Why do American public schools spend more of their operating budgets on non-teachers than almost every other country in the world, including nations that are as prosperous and humane as ours? We can’t be certain.

Other Media

Does It Even Matter if Americans Are Terrible At Math?

quoting Eric Hanushekvia Vox
Wednesday, August 13, 2014

If there's one thing Americans know about international tests, it's this: we aren't very good at them. In 2012, the last time 15-year-olds from 65 countries and economies took an international math test, the US ended up ranked far from the top — particularly in math, where they were 27th of 34 countries. (The rankings aren't an exact science; the US could be ranked anywhere between 23rd and 29th, according to the Organization for Economic and Community Development.)

Blogs

Saving Schools—Launching My MOOC on HarvardX

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Monday, August 4, 2014

“Put your money where your mouth is. ”The shibboleth has haunted me since 2010 when I concluded my book Saving Schools with an endorsement of online learning. Using new technologies, students could choose among dozens of options, I said. One great lecturer could teach thousands, even millions, I imagined. Outside experts could view the content, identify weaknesses, propose solutions, I argued.  Continuous improvement would replace the stagnation of the past 50 years of American education, I hoped.

Blogs

Save Our Data! Protect the Integrity of Education Statistics

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Education Next
Monday, August 4, 2014

The possibility that the 113th Congress might yet reauthorize the Institute for Education Sciences (IES)—the House has passed H.R. 4366 and the Senate HELP Committee is cogitating—means it’s time once again to consider the status of the jewel in the IES crown, namely the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).

Featured Commentary

Education Reform in 2014

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Education Next
Friday, August 1, 2014

This short essay cannot begin to say all that deserves to be said about the state of ed-reform in America in 2014, but it gives me an opportunity to do some stocktaking, recount a bit of history, and flag some challenges for the future.

Blogs

Teacher-Tenure Decision Is NOT an Abuse of Judicial Power

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Thursday, July 31, 2014

In June, a judge declared California’s seniority protection laws unconstitutional. Citing the 1954 Brown decision, Judge Rolf Treu, in Vergara v. California, declared the laws in violation of the equal protection clause of the California state constitution because they limited minority access to effective teachers.

Blogs

Pre-Kraziness

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Education Next
Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Way back in 2000, the United Nations went through an elaborate process of setting “millennium development goals” for the world. To be attained by 2015, these were, of course, entirely laudable—e.g., “eradicate extreme poverty and hunger” and “achieve universal primary education”—and they have definitely influenced the priorities of various UN agencies, other governmental and multilateral aid providers, and private philanthropies.

Pages

Eric A. Hanushek

International Study Coauthored by Hoover Fellow Eric Hanushek Shows Clear Evidence of Economic Benefits of Educational Improvement

Monday, January 25, 2010
Stanford

Findings from a newly released report, The High Cost of Low Educational Performance: The Long-Run Economic Impact of Improving PISA Outcomes, were presented by Eric Hanushek, a coauthor of the report and the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow in Education at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. . . .

Press Releases
Chester E. Finn Jr.

Koret Task Force on K–12 Education dinner

Thursday, January 14, 2010
Hoover

The Hoover Institution’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education dinner was held in the Nicolas de Basily Room of the Hoover Tower on January 14. Task force member Chester Finn moderated a before-dinner discussion on the economic stimulus package and the “race to the top.”

Event
Learning as We Go: Why School Choice is Worth the Wait

Learning as We Go: Why School Choice Is Worth the Wait, by Paul T. Hill

Tuesday, January 12, 2010
Stanford

Issues behind the hotly debated topic of school choice are scrutinized by Hoover fellow Paul T. Hill in Learning as We Go: Why School Choice Is Worth the Wait (Hoover Press, 2010).

Press Releases

Media Colloquium “Getting Beneath Current Educational Policty Debates”

Friday, September 18, 2009
Annenberg Conference Room, Lou Henry Hoover Building

Policy debates within the field of education were the focus of a media colloquium held September 18 as part of a meeting by the Hoover Institution’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education. The colloquium titled “Getting Beneath Current Educational Policy Debates,” featured presentations by task force members on a variety of topical issues.

Event

Koret Task Force on K–12 Education dinner

Thursday, September 17, 2009
Hoover

Hoover’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education is embarking on a project that looks at the future of American education. At a dinner, which was part of the task force’s semiannual meeting, task force members gave us a glimpse at what their expectations are and what might be done to address problems on the horizon. Topics include technology, family structure, school organization, district organization, political implications, standards, performance, teachers, finance, privatization, and school choice. The final report will be published in 2010.

Event
Hoover senior fellows Eric Hanushek (left) and Paul Peterson

Video commentary with Hoover senior fellows Eric Hanushek and Paul Peterson

Monday, July 6, 2009

Hoover Institution senior fellows and members of Hoover’s Task Force on K–12 Education Eric Hanushek and Paul Peterson discuss the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning English-language learners.

News
Hoover senior fellow Eric Hanushek is interviewed concerning his new book Schoolhouses, Courthouses, and Statehouses.

Schoolhouses, Courthouses, and Statehouses

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Video commentary with Hoover senior fellows Eric Hanushek and Terry Moe

News
Liberating Learning: Technology, Politics, and the Future of American Education

Liberating Learning: Technology, Politics, and the Future of American Education, by Hoover Fellows Terry M. Moe and John Chubb

Wednesday, June 10, 2009
Stanford

Technology has transformed all aspects of our everyday lives. From online banking to social networking, we communicate, connect, and consume in ways radically different from the past. Yet the average classroom is not that different from the classroom of fifty years ago.

Press Releases
Terry Moe&esquo;s Liberating Learning interview.

Liberating Learning

Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Video commentary with Hoover senior fellows Terry Moe and Eric Hanushek

News
Schoolhouses, Courthouses, and Statehouses

Schoolhouses, Courthouses, and Statehouses, by Hoover Fellow Eric Hanushek and Alfred Lindseth

Tuesday, June 9, 2009
Stanford

Public school funding has quadrupled during the past few decades, spurred by court rulings requiring states to increase such funding.

Press Releases

Pages

The K–12 Education Task Force focuses on education policy as it relates to government provision and oversight versus private solutions (both within and outside the public school system) that stress choice, accountability, and transparency; that include systematic reform options such as vouchers, charter schools, and testing; and that weigh equity concerns against outcome objectives.

Its collaborative efforts spawned a quarterly journal titled Education Next, one of the premier publications on public education research policy in the nation.

Chester E. Finn, Jr. serves as chair of the Task Force on K–12 education.