Fellows
Fellows
national medal of science
nobel prize
national humanities medal
american academy of arts and sciences
presidential medal of freedom
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Hsiao-ting Lin
curator, east asia collection
research fellow

Expertise: Modern Chinese history, U.S.-Taiwan relations, ethnopolitics in the greater China area

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Breaking with the Past

Hsiao-ting Lin is a research fellow and curator of the East Asia Collection at the Hoover Institution. He holds a BA in political science from National Taiwan University (1994) and an MA in international law and diplomacy from National Chengchi University in Taiwan (1997). He received his DPhil in oriental studies in 2003 from the University of Oxford, where he also held an appointment as tutorial fellow in modern Chinese history. In 2003–4, Lin was a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California at Berkeley. In 2004, he was awarded the Kiriyama Distinguished Fellowship by the Center for the Pacific Rim, University of San Francisco. In 2005–7, he was a visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution, where he participated in Hoover’s Modern China Archives and Special Collections project. In April 2008, Lin was elected a fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland for his contributions to the studies of modern China’s history.

Lin’s academic interests include ethnopolitics and minority issues in greater China, border strategies and defenses in modern China, political institutions and the bureaucratic system of the Chinese Nationalist Party (Kuomintang), and US-Taiwan military and political relations during the early Cold War. He has published extensively on modern Chinese politics, history, and ethnic minorities, including Modern China’s Ethnic Frontiers: A Journey to the West (Routledge, 2011); T. V. Soong: Selected War Correspondences, 1940–1943 (Fudan University Press, 2010); T. V. Soong: Important Wartime Correspondences, 1940–1942 (Fudan University Press, 2009); Tibet and Nationalist China’s Frontier: Intrigues and Ethnopolitics, 1928–49 (UBC Press, 2006), nominated as the best study in the humanities at the 2007 International Convention of Asia Scholars; Breaking with the Past: The Kuomintang Central Reform Committee on Taiwan, 1950–52 (Hoover Press, 2007); and more than eighty journal articles, book chapters, essays, reviews, and translations. He is currently at work on a manuscript that discusses Chiang Kai-shek’s relations with the United States during the presidency of Dwight D. Eisenhower to that of Richard Nixon.

Last updated on June 13, 2012