Adam J. White

Research Fellow
Biography: 

Adam White is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, based in Washington, DC, writing on the courts and the administrative state for such publications as The Weekly StandardThe Wall Street JournalCommentaryThe Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, and SCOTUSblog. He is a contributing editor with National AffairsThe New Atlantis, and City Journal, and a contributor to the Yale Journal on Regulation's blog, "Notice and Comment."

Prior to joining Hoover, he was an adjunct fellow at the Manhattan Institute. 

In addition to his research and writing, he practiced law with Boyden Gray & Associates, writing briefs on constitutional and regulatory issues in the Supreme Court and various other federal courts. (He continues to be "of counsel" to the firm in three pending cases involving the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Federal Communications Commission.) Previously, he was a senior associate with Baker Botts, working on various constitutional and regulatory matters, including energy infrastructure regulation.

In 2015 he was appointed to the leadership council of the American Bar Association's Section of Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice, where he co-chairs the Judicial Review committee and co-directs its Supreme Court Series. He also is a member of the executive committee of the Federalist Society's Administrative Law & Regulation Practice Group.

He received his J.D. (cum laude) from Harvard Law School, and his B.B.A. (economics) from the University of Iowa College of Business. He clerked for Judge David B. Sentelle of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

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Recent Commentary

Featured

Senate Democrats' Incoherence On Gorsuch And Executive Power

by Adam J. Whitevia The Weekly Standard
Monday, March 20, 2017

They complain that he'll be too deferential to Trump and yet not deferential enough.

Analysis and Commentary

The Structure of Regulatory Revolutions

by Adam J. Whitevia Yale Journal on Regulation
Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Today the most important book in administrative law is one that was written a half-century ago—but not by Kenneth Culp Davis, or Walter Gellhorn, or James Landis, or the other legends of administrative law. The author was a scientist, Thomas S. Kuhn, and the book is The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Everyone interested in administrative law should take a moment to read and reflect upon Kuhn’s classic book, especially as the Senate undertakes its confirmation hearing for Judge Neil Gorsuch’s nomination to the Supreme Court.

Featured

Ethics In The Executive

by Adam J. Whitevia City Journal
Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Unless President Trump and his administration put a high priority on integrity, they will see their energies drained away by investigation and opposition.

Featured

The Power Of The Presidential Pen

by Adam J. Whitevia The Weekly Standard
Monday, March 13, 2017

The benefits and pitfalls of executive orders.

Analysis and Commentary

The D.C. Circuit’s “Trump Card” For Executive Orders

by Adam J. Whitevia Yale Journal on Regulation
Monday, March 13, 2017

As countless commentators have observed, President Trump’s first months in office have been marked by the issuance of significant executive orders and other executive actions aimed at undoing or reforming the work of his predecessor, and charting a new policy course forward.

Analysis and Commentary

Break The Bureaucracy!

by Adam J. Whitevia City Journal
Tuesday, February 21, 2017
Among the opportunities presented by Donald Trump’s election is that we may finally witness fundamental reform of America’s administrative state.
Featured

Higher Justice

by Adam J. Whitevia The Weekly Standard
Monday, February 20, 2017

Judge Neil Gorsuch's constitutionalism contrasts starkly with the progressive administrative state—and the president who is appointing him.

Featured

Higher Justice

by Adam J. Whitevia The Weekly Standard
Monday, February 20, 2017

Judge Neil Gorsuch's constitutionalism contrasts starkly with the progressive administrative state—and the president who is appointing him.

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Featured

Schumer’s Nuclear Showdown

by Adam J. Whitevia City Journal
Tuesday, February 7, 2017

The Gorsuch nomination puts Senate Democrats in a bind.

Featured

Reforming Administrative Law To Reflect Administrative Reality

by Adam J. Whitevia National Affairs
Wednesday, January 18, 2017

In the concluding essay for a short book published by National Affairs, Hoover Institution fellow Adam White proposes a number of significant reforms to the laws governing federal agencies’ regulatory activities and the laws governing judicial review of those regulatory activities. From requiring agencies to conduct a more transparent and participatory process, to reducing judicial “deference” to agency decisions, to fast-tracking certain types of judicial review, this essay challenges Congress to update the 70-year-old Administrative Procedure Act, so that the law once again reflects modern reality.

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