Angelo M. Codevilla

Biography: 

Angelo M. Codevilla, a native of Italy, is a professor emeritus of international relations at Boston University. He was a US naval officer and Foreign Service officer and served on the Senate Intelligence Committee as well as on presidential transition teams. For a decade he was a senior research fellow at the Hoover Institution. He is the author of fourteen books, including War Ends and Means, The Character of Nations, Advice to War Presidents, and most recently, To Make and Keep Peace Among Ourselves and with All Nations. He is a student of the classics as well as of European literature; he is also a commercial grape grower. Video: Angelo Codevilla on the importance of history in current policy decisions.

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Recent Commentary

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Are Traditional US Security Guarantees Still Sufficient?

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Analysis
Thursday, March 24, 2016

To defend allies against nuclear-armed nations we must become able to protect ourselves against missile attack. Our missile defense programs are not serious about that and cannot lead to that. To avoid defending ourselves, we defend allies badly. The United States has shelved the technologies that make for seriousness in missile defense: launching surface-based interceptors on the basis of data from orbit and striking missiles as they rise into space with orbit-based lasers. Taking these technologies off our shelf before others develop them is essential if our guarantees are to safeguard rather than endanger all concerned.

Featured CommentaryFeatured

America Entered Into A Raw Deal With Iran

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Monday, March 14, 2016

On January 16, 2016, governments in Europe and America ended the sanctions they had imposed on Iran (the U.S. since 1979, Europe since 2007 and increasingly since 2012) for reasons internal to themselves. Iran had not changed the behavior that had led to the imposition of sanctions—neither its nuclear program nor its leadership of the Shia side in the current round of the Sunni-Shia war. 

Weapons & Technology

Nuclear Weapons and Foreign Policy, by Henry A. Kissinger (1957)

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Classics of Military History
Tuesday, March 8, 2016

This book is the template of U.S. nuclear weapons policy since the Kennedy Administration, as well as of how the U.S. government has conducted war since Vietnam. Published by the Council on Foreign Relations as the report of a high level working group, it was the Democratic Party’s intellectual attack on the Eisenhower Administration’s policy of responding to Soviet aggression “by means and at places of our choosing.”

Weapons & Technology

On Thermonuclear War, by Herman Kahn (1960)

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Classics of Military History
Tuesday, March 8, 2016

By the late 1950s, the notion that nuclear war would extinguish mankind, dramatized in Nevil Shute’s best selling On The Beach and the subsequent movie, or kill hundreds of millions of Americans at the very least, had become prevalent. 

Weapons & Technology

The Absolute Weapon: Atomic Power and World Order, by Bernard Brodie (1946)

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Classics of Military History
Tuesday, March 8, 2016

It is no exaggeration that, for seventy years, the mainstream of American thought on nuclear war has been a gloss on this volume’s essays, written within weeks of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. From the fact that two bombs had destroyed two cities, the book extrapolates a full-grown doctrine of war in the nuclear age. 

Weapons & Technology

Soviet Strategy For Nuclear War, by Joseph D. Douglass, Jr. and Amoretta M. Hoeber (1979)

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Classics of Military History
Monday, March 7, 2016

The Soviet view of nuclear war has never been readily available to American audiences. Beginning in the late 1960s (after the Glassboro, NJ summit of 1967), the Soviet Union went to great lengths to convince Americans that they shared the terms of reference that the above- mentioned books had established in America. 

Poster Collection, US 7445 Hoover Institution Archives.
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

When The Cards Are Stacked Against You

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Tuesday, November 24, 2015

On November 5, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln replaced General George McClellan with the bellicose General Ambrose Burnside as the head of the Army of the Potomac.

Poster Collection, IT 295, Hoover Institution Archives.
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

A Lesson From An Empire In Decline On How Not To Manage Alien Populations

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Thursday, November 19, 2015

In November of AD 386, the Roman Army of the lower Danube tricked a horde of Ostrogoths into an attempt to cross the frozen river with some 3,000 canoes.

International SecurityAnalysis and Commentary

A Brutal Example From Roman History On How To Defeat ISIS

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Wednesday, November 11, 2015

At the end of the fighting season of 211 B.C., quite possibly in November, Rome had defeated Hannibal’s fundamental political strategy, although no Roman army had yet defeated Hannibal in the open field.

Poster Collection, US 4103, Hoover Institution Archives.
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

U.S. And Russian Airpower In The Desert

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Wednesday, November 4, 2015

On November 1, 1911, Italian Second Lieutenant Guilio Gavotti, flying an Etrich Taube water-cooled monoplane took a 1.5 kilo bomb from his lap and dropped it onto the Ottoman-held Ain Zara oasis south of Tripoli.

Pages