Angelo M. Codevilla

Angelo M. Codevilla

Biography: 

Angelo M. Codevilla, a native of Italy, is a professor emeritus of international relations at Boston University. He was a US naval officer and Foreign Service officer and served on the Senate Intelligence Committee as well as on presidential transition teams. For a decade he was a senior research fellow at the Hoover Institution. He is the author of thirteen books, including War Ends and Means, Informing Statecraft, The Character of Nations, Advice to War Presidents, and A Students’ Guide to International Relations. He is a student of the classics as well as of European literature; he is also a commercial grape grower. Video: Angelo Codevilla on the importance of history in current policy decisions.

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Countering Russian Ambitions

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Any thought of countering Russian ambitions in Europe must be premised on the fact that Western Europeans’ interest in doing this is verbal at best. Absent Western Europe’s active cooperation, U.S. attempts to strengthen the front line states of the former Warsaw Pact and of the former Soviet Union would face formidable hurdles and perhaps invite Russia to test our seriousness.

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To Restrain Russia, Drop The Ambiguity

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Lack of means is no part of the reason why U.S. policy is failing to restrain Russia. Rather, that reason lies in the U.S. government’s simultaneous pursuit of self-contradictory objectives, what Henry Kissinger extolled as “creative ambiguity.” This has opened a fateful gap between words and deeds. Clear, univocal policy that unites words and deeds, ends and means, has ever been the prerequisite of seriousness.

Podcast: Strategika: “America’s Ambiguous Russia Policy ” with Angelo Codevilla
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Why Some Anti-Terrorist Rescues Succeed While Others Fail

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Governments of Europe, the United States, and now Japan—disposing as they do of enormous resources of all kinds and pressured as they are by their own populations—having failed to rescue their citizens held by the Islamic State that disposes of few resources of any kind, raises the question of what it is that that shields the latter and debilitates the former.

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Traditional Naval Bases Still Matter

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Wednesday, January 21, 2015

The importance of naval bases—hence the need to protect them—and the extraordinary efforts required to make up for bases lost, ranks high among the many lessons of which the month of January should remind persons concerned with America’s military viability.

Excerpt of Poster Collection, INT 74.12, Hoover Institution Archives.
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Who Is Bargaining With Whom?

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Friday, January 16, 2015

In mid-January 2015, as we may be entering a more intense phase of the civilizational conflict that has characterized our century, Henry Kissinger’s capstone book, World Order, perpetuates a legacy of strategic thought centered on resolving major conflicts through grand bargains pursued through complex signals.

Poster Collection, INT 338, Hoover Institution Archives.
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Time of The Assassins, Or of The Jackals?

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Tuesday, January 13, 2015

The first week of January 2015’s biggest news—three Muslim jihadists murdering a dozen journalists in their Paris office, another killing four patrons in a nearby Kosher market, and the reactions to these events—leads us to ask what history may teach us about such people and how we may rid ourselves of them.

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Strategika – “What China Really Wants” with Angelo Codevilla

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Explaining the nature of Chinese ambition in East Asia.

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The Main Obstacle

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

As in previous millennia of history, China’s objective for its periphery—the East Asia/Western Pacific region—is subordination of some kind or degree. Japan, being the only indigenous major power in the region, and allied formally with the United States (Russia having ceased to be an Asian power), is the main obstacle to that desired suzerainty.

Podcast: Strategika – “What China Really Wants” with Angelo Codevilla
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The Trajectory of North Pacific Tensions

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

Korea is the ever-sharpening focus of the growing tensions between China and Japan because moving Korea out of the security alliance led by the U.S. and Japan is the proximate objective of China’s grand design for the North Pacific.

Washington DC Skyline
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Washington’s Ruling Class Is Fooling Itself About The Islamic State

by Angelo M. Codevillavia The Federalist
Friday, September 19, 2014

The American people’s reaction to Muslim thugs of the “Islamic State” ritually knifing off the heads of people who look like you and me boils down to “let’s destroy these bastards”—which is common sense.

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