Angelo M. Codevilla

Biography: 

Angelo M. Codevilla, a native of Italy, is a professor emeritus of international relations at Boston University. He was a US naval officer and Foreign Service officer and served on the Senate Intelligence Committee as well as on presidential transition teams. For a decade he was a senior research fellow at the Hoover Institution. He is the author of fourteen books, including War Ends and Means, The Character of Nations, Advice to War Presidents, and most recently, To Make and Keep Peace Among Ourselves and with All Nations. He is a student of the classics as well as of European literature; he is also a commercial grape grower. Video: Angelo Codevilla on the importance of history in current policy decisions.

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Poster Collection, US 7445 Hoover Institution Archives.
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

When The Cards Are Stacked Against You

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Tuesday, November 24, 2015

On November 5, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln replaced General George McClellan with the bellicose General Ambrose Burnside as the head of the Army of the Potomac.

Poster Collection, IT 295, Hoover Institution Archives.
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

A Lesson From An Empire In Decline On How Not To Manage Alien Populations

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Thursday, November 19, 2015

In November of AD 386, the Roman Army of the lower Danube tricked a horde of Ostrogoths into an attempt to cross the frozen river with some 3,000 canoes.

International SecurityAnalysis and Commentary

A Brutal Example From Roman History On How To Defeat ISIS

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Wednesday, November 11, 2015

At the end of the fighting season of 211 B.C., quite possibly in November, Rome had defeated Hannibal’s fundamental political strategy, although no Roman army had yet defeated Hannibal in the open field.

Poster Collection, US 4103, Hoover Institution Archives.
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U.S. And Russian Airpower In The Desert

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Wednesday, November 4, 2015

On November 1, 1911, Italian Second Lieutenant Guilio Gavotti, flying an Etrich Taube water-cooled monoplane took a 1.5 kilo bomb from his lap and dropped it onto the Ottoman-held Ain Zara oasis south of Tripoli.

Background EssayAnalysis and Commentary

The Flaws Of Arms Control

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Tuesday, August 25, 2015

The U.S.-Iran “agreement” of 2015—its genesis, the negotiations that led to it, and its likely consequences—is comprehensible only in terms of a set of ideas peculiar to the post-WWI era, which distinguishes it from previous historical examples.

Analysis and Commentary

Megyn Kelly Shows How Low Our Political Discourse Has Sunk

by Angelo M. Codevillavia The Federalist
Thursday, August 13, 2015
We should return to the debate formats of Lincoln's day.
Related Commentary

Conflicting Identities In the U.S. Armed Forces

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Monday, July 27, 2015

My time on Navy active duty being long past, my insights into how the social changes imposed on the armed forces impact their capacity for combat flow from my acquaintance with former students who are now serving

Related Commentary

Countering Russian Ambitions

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Any thought of countering Russian ambitions in Europe must be premised on the fact that Western Europeans’ interest in doing this is verbal at best. Absent Western Europe’s active cooperation, U.S. attempts to strengthen the front line states of the former Warsaw Pact and of the former Soviet Union would face formidable hurdles and perhaps invite Russia to test our seriousness.

Featured CommentaryAnalysis and Commentary

To Restrain Russia, Drop The Ambiguity

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Lack of means is no part of the reason why U.S. policy is failing to restrain Russia. Rather, that reason lies in the U.S. government’s simultaneous pursuit of self-contradictory objectives, what Henry Kissinger extolled as “creative ambiguity.” This has opened a fateful gap between words and deeds. Clear, univocal policy that unites words and deeds, ends and means, has ever been the prerequisite of seriousness.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Why Some Anti-Terrorist Rescues Succeed While Others Fail

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Governments of Europe, the United States, and now Japan—disposing as they do of enormous resources of all kinds and pressured as they are by their own populations—having failed to rescue their citizens held by the Islamic State that disposes of few resources of any kind, raises the question of what it is that that shields the latter and debilitates the former.

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