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Brandon L. Wright

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Analysis and Commentary

What Philanthropy Has Done Right — And Done Wrong — On Charter Schools

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Bruno V. Manno, Brandon L. Wright via The Chronicle of Philanthropy
Monday, June 12, 2017

September 2017 will mark the 25th anniversary of the opening of America’s first charter school, City Academy High School in St. Paul, Minn. In the quarter-century since its founding, charters have become the fastest-growing school-choice option in the United States, with almost 7,000 of them enrolling more than 6 percent of public-school-age pupils. (In 17 districts, the figure is more than 30 percent.) Charters account for the entire growth of K-12 public-school enrollment since 2006.

Analysis and Commentary

New Jersey’s Plan To Fix Its Failing Schools Falls Flat

by Brandon L. Wright , Michael J. Petrillivia Trentonian
Tuesday, June 6, 2017

New Jersey’s plan to fix its lowest performing schools is about as creative and inspiring as a rest stop on the Turnpike. We don’t mean that as a compliment.

Analysis and Commentary

Three Ways Charters Reform And Improve Our Schools

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Bruno V. Manno, Brandon L. Wright via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Friday, May 26, 2017

City Academy High School in St. Paul, Minnesota, will celebrate a milestone in September: twenty-five years as the nation's first charter school. During that quarter century, charter school growth has been remarkable. Today, forty-four states and Washington, D.C. contain some seven thousand of these independently operated public schools, serving nearly 3 million students. Remarkably, charters account for the entire growth in U.S. K–12 public school enrollments since 2006.

Featured

The Purpose Of Charter Schools

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Bruno V. Manno, Brandon L. Wright via US News
Monday, May 8, 2017

3 ways charters reform and improve district-level schools.

Analysis and Commentary

Illinois’ School Accountability Plan Needs Work

by Michael J. Petrilli, Brandon L. Wright via The State Journal-Register
Thursday, April 27, 2017

Illinois’ plan to hold schools accountable for student outcomes does some things right, and is a significant improvement on the state’s previous framework, but it doesn’t do enough to meet the educational needs of high achievers — especially those growing up in poverty.

Analysis and Commentary

How To Improve D.C.’s Flawed School Accountability Plan

by Michael J. Petrilli, Brandon L. Wright via The Washington Post
Thursday, April 6, 2017

D.C.’s recently approved plan to hold schools accountable for strong student outcomes fails to meet the educational needs of high achievers — especially those growing up in poverty.

Analysis and Commentary

How To Improve New Jersey’s Flawed School Accountability Plan

by Michael J. Petrilli, Brandon L. Wright via Trentonian
Monday, April 3, 2017

New Jersey’s proposed plan to hold schools accountable for strong student outcomes fails to meet the educational needs of high achievers—especially those growing up in poverty.

Analysis and Commentary

How To Improve Delaware’s School Accountability Plan

by Michael J. Petrilli, Brandon L. Wright via Delaware Online
Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Delaware’s proposed plan to hold schools accountable for student outcomes does a lot of things right, but it doesn’t do all it could to meet the educational needs of high achievers, especially those growing up in poverty.

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The Schools We Deserve

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Bruno V. Manno, Brandon L. Wright via Hoover Digest
Friday, January 27, 2017

Old-style local control of public schools is fading—except, that is, in charter schools. 

Analysis and Commentary

Don't Leave High-Achieving Poor, Minority Students Behind

by Michael J. Petrilli, Brandon L. Wright via The Northwest Indiana Times
Friday, January 6, 2017

Indiana needs to improve its accountability system for K–12 education. A relic of the No Child Left Behind era, it has a critical flaw, encouraging schools to narrowly focus on the progress of their lowest-performing students.

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