Henry I. Miller

Robert Wesson Fellow in Scientific Philosophy and Public Policy
Biography: 

Henry I. Miller, MS, MD, is the Robert Wesson Fellow in Scientific Philosophy and Public Policy at the Hoover Institution. His research focuses on public policy toward science and technology, encompassing a number of areas, including pharmaceutical development, genetic engineering in agriculture, models for regulatory reform, and the emergence of new viral diseases.

Miller served for fifteen years at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in a number of posts. He was the medical reviewer for the first genetically engineered drugs to be evaluated by the FDA and thus instrumental in the rapid licensing of human insulin and human growth hormone. Thereafter, he was a special assistant to the FDA commissioner and the founding director of the FDA's Office of Biotechnology. During his government service, Miller participated frequently on various expert and policy panels as a representative of the FDA or the US government. As a government official, Miller received numerous awards and citations.

Since coming to the Hoover Institution, Miller has become well known not only for his contributions to scholarly journals but also for his articles and books that make science, medicine, and technology accessible. His work has been widely published in many languages. Monographs include Policy Controversy in Biotechnology: An Insider's View; To America's Health: A Model for Reform of the Food and Drug Administration; and The Frankenfood Myth: How Protest and Politics Threaten the Biotech Revolution. Barron's selected The Frankenfood Myth as one of the 25 Best Books of 2004. In addition, Miller has published extensively in a wide spectrum of scholarly journals and popular publications worldwide, including The Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, Science, the Nature family of journals, Chronicle of Higher Education, Forbes, National Review, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, the Guardian, Defining Ideas, and the Financial Times. He is a regulator contributor to Forbes.com and frequently appears on the nationally syndicated radio programs of John Batchelor and Lars Larson.

Miller was selected by the editors of Nature Biotechnology as one of the people who had made the "most significant contributions" to biotechnology during the previous decade. He serves on numerous editorial boards.

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Recent Commentary

The Triumph of “Basic Science”

by Henry I. Millervia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, August 30, 2016

We should support good research even it doesn’t immediately offer clear benefits to society 

Analysis and Commentary

The Buzz: Six Reasons Not To Worry About The Bees

by Henry I. Millervia Forbes
Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Bees are in the news, but for all the wrong reasons—mainly, dire tales of disappearing bees threatening a third of our food supply. 

Analysis and Commentary

Congress Must Do More To Combat Unaccountable Bureaucrats’ Funding Of Junk Science

by Henry I. Miller, Jeff Stiervia National Review
Monday, August 22, 2016

Dubious, agenda-driven studies on hot-button issues are draining funds from vital public-health research.

Analysis and Commentary

The Obama Administration Lacks Transparency, Resists Oversight

by Henry I. Miller, Jeff Stiervia The Hill
Thursday, August 11, 2016

Congressional oversight of Executive Branch agencies is a fundamental element of the checks and balances that prevent abuses of power in any one branch of government. The Obama Administration has resisted that oversight repeatedly for a range of reasons, all nefarious. 

Featured

The Phony Case Against Glyphosate

by Julie Kelly, Henry I. Millervia National Review
Thursday, August 11, 2016

Green zealots pressure the EPA to ban valuable weapons against hunger and disease. 

Featured

Feds' Response To Zika Is More Politics Than Public Health

by Henry I. Millervia Forbes
Wednesday, August 10, 2016

In the most aggressive “surge” of his presidency, President Obama recently ordered his troops to conduct a major offensive. No, it was not more boots on the ground or air sorties in Syria or Iraq; it was a series of shrill attacks by a platoon of senior administration officials on Congress for failing to appropriate all the new money requested by the president for Zika virus-related activities.

Featured

There’s No Panacea For The Zika Epidemic

by Henry I. Millervia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Since a vaccine is probably years away, the priority is to kill the mosquitoes that transmit the virus.

Analysis and Commentary

Regulators’ Infectious Zika Incompetence

by Henry I. Miller, John Cohrssenvia National Review
Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Interdepartmental buck-passing, big-government sloth, and anti-science ideology are allowing a needless spread of the disease.

Economist Adam Smith Knew A Creep When He Saw One

by Henry I. Miller
Wednesday, July 27, 2016

It is remarkable to see broad and bipartisan majorities in both the House and Senate come together to pass this GMO disclosure legislation.

Analysis and Commentary

What’s In A Name? Plenty, If It’s A ‘GMO.’

by Henry I. Millervia National Review
Wednesday, July 20, 2016

'Genetically modified organism’ is a meaningless category.

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