John B. Taylor

George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics
Awards and Honors:
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Econometric Society (elected fellow)
Economics Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award

John B. Taylor is the George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics at the Hoover Institution and the Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics at Stanford University. He chairs the Hoover Working Group on Economic Policy and is director of Stanford’s Introductory Economics Center.

Taylor's fields of expertise are monetary policy, fiscal policy, and international economics. His book Getting Off Track was one of the first on the financial crisis; his latest book, First Principles, for which he received the 2012 Hayek Prize, develops an economic plan to restore America’s prosperity.

Taylor served as senior economist on President Ford's and President Carter’s Council of Economic Advisers, as a member of President George H. W. Bush's Council of Economic Advisers, and as a senior economic adviser to Bob Dole’s presidential campaign, to George W. Bush’s presidential campaign in 2000, and to John McCain’s presidential campaign. He was a member of the Congressional Budget Office's Panel of Economic Advisers from 1995 to 2001. From 2001 to 2005, Taylor served as undersecretary of the Treasury for international affairs where he was responsible for currency markets, international development, for oversight of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and for coordinating policy with the G-7 and G-20.

Taylor received the Bradley Prize from the Bradley Foundation and the Adam Smith Award as well as the Adolph G. Abramson Award from the National Association for Business Economics. He was awarded the Alexander Hamilton Award for his overall leadership at the US Treasury, the Treasury Distinguished Service Award for designing and implementing the currency reforms in Iraq, and the Medal of the Republic of Uruguay for his work in resolving the 2002 financial crisis. At Stanford he was awarded the George P. Shultz Distinguished Public Service Award, as well as the Hoagland Prize and the Rhodes Prize for excellence in undergraduate teaching. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society; he formerly served as vice president of the American Economic Association.

Taylor received the 2016 Adam Smith Award from the Association of Private Enterprise Education and the 2015 Truman Medal for Economic Policy for extraordinary contribution to the formation and conduct of economic policy.

Taylor formerly held positions as professor of economics at Princeton University and Columbia University. Taylor received a BA in economics summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1968 and a PhD in economics from Stanford University in 1973.

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Recent Commentary


Take Off The Muzzle And The Economy Will Roar

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Sunday, October 16, 2016

In his Saturday Wall Street Journal essay “Why the Economy Doesn’t Roar Anymore”—illustrated with a big lion with its mouth shut—Marc Levinson offers the answer that the “U.S. economy isn’t behaving badly. It is just being ordinary.” But there is nothing ordinary (or secular) about the current stagnation of barely 2 percent growth.


Should The Previous Framework For Monetary Policy Be Fundamentally Reconsidered?

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Sunday, October 2, 2016

"Did the crisis reveal that the previous consensus framework for monetary policy was inadequate and should be fundamentally reconsidered?” “Did economic relationships fundamentally change after the crisis and if so how?” These important questions set the theme for an excellent conference at the De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB) in Amsterdam this past week.


The Statistical Analysis Of Policy Rules

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Saturday, September 24, 2016

My teacher, colleague, and good friend Ted Anderson died this week at the age of 98. Ted was my Ph.D. thesis adviser at Stanford in the early 1970s, and later a colleague when I returned to teach at Stanford in the 1980s.

Analysis and Commentary

Monetarist Tools Have Failed To Lift Economies

by John B. Taylor, John Eatwellvia Financial Times
Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Sir, You report that Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of England, told MPs that the BoE is prepared to cut interest rates further from their historic low of 0.25 per cent.

Analysis and Commentary

Central Banks Going Beyond Their Range

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Economist John Eatwell of Cambridge and I published a joint letter in the Financial Times today. We argue that monetary policy is off track and that other policies are sorely needed. I said the same in a CNBC interview from Miami this morning. 


Kocherlakota On The Fed And The Taylor Rule

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Saturday, September 17, 2016

The use of policy rules to analyze monetary policy has been a growing area of research for several decades, and the pace has picked up recently. Last month Janet Yellen presented a policy framework for the future centered around a Taylor rule, noting that the Fed has deviated from such a rule in recent years. 

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Novel Research On Elections, Policymaking, Economic Uncertainty

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Wednesday, September 14, 2016

The Becker Friedman Institute of the University of Chicago and the Hoover Institution of Stanford University teamed up yesterday to put on a Conference on Elections, Policymaking, and Economic Uncertainty. The conference was held at the Hoover Institution Offices in Washington D.C. Steve Davis, Lars Hansen and I organized it. 


Think Again And Again About The Natural Rate Of Interest

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Monday, September 12, 2016

In a recent Wall Street Journal piece, “Think You Know the Natural Rate of Interest? Think Again,” James Mackintosh warns about the high level of uncertainty in recent estimates of the equilibrium interest rate—commonly called r* or the natural rate—that are being factored into monetary policy decisions by the Fed.


Jackson Hole XXXV

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Everyone keeps asking about this year’s Jackson Hole monetary conference and how it compared with the first. Well, I wrote about the first on my way to this conference, and I have to say the thirty fifth lived up to its billing as “monetary policy frameworks for the future.”

Analysis and Commentary

A Less Weird Time At Jackson Hole?

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Wednesday, August 24, 2016

I’m on my way to join the world’s central bankers at Jackson Hole for the 35th annual monetary-policy conference in the Grand Teton Mountains. I attended the first monetary-policy conference there in 1982, and I may be the only person to attend both the 1st and the 35th.