John B. Taylor

George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics
Awards and Honors:
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Econometric Society (elected fellow)
Economics Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award
(2015)
Biography: 

John B. Taylor is the George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics at the Hoover Institution and the Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics at Stanford University. He chairs the Hoover Working Group on Economic Policy and is director of Stanford’s Introductory Economics Center.

Taylor's fields of expertise are monetary policy, fiscal policy, and international economics. His book Getting Off Track was one of the first on the financial crisis; his latest book, First Principles, for which he received the 2012 Hayek Prize, develops an economic plan to restore America’s prosperity.

Taylor served as senior economist on President Ford's and President Carter’s Council of Economic Advisers, as a member of President George H. W. Bush's Council of Economic Advisers, and as a senior economic adviser to Bob Dole’s presidential campaign, to George W. Bush’s presidential campaign in 2000, and to John McCain’s presidential campaign. He was a member of the Congressional Budget Office's Panel of Economic Advisers from 1995 to 2001. From 2001 to 2005, Taylor served as undersecretary of the Treasury for international affairs where he was responsible for currency markets, international development, for oversight of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and for coordinating policy with the G-7 and G-20.

Taylor received the Bradley Prize from the Bradley Foundation and the Adam Smith Award as well as the Adolph G. Abramson Award from the National Association for Business Economics. He was awarded the Alexander Hamilton Award for his overall leadership at the US Treasury, the Treasury Distinguished Service Award for designing and implementing the currency reforms in Iraq, and the Medal of the Republic of Uruguay for his work in resolving the 2002 financial crisis. At Stanford he was awarded the George P. Shultz Distinguished Public Service Award, as well as the Hoagland Prize and the Rhodes Prize for excellence in undergraduate teaching. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society; he formerly served as vice president of the American Economic Association.

Taylor received the 2016 Adam Smith Award from the Association of Private Enterprise Education and the 2015 Truman Medal for Economic Policy for extraordinary contribution to the formation and conduct of economic policy.

Taylor formerly held positions as professor of economics at Princeton University and Columbia University. Taylor received a BA in economics summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1968 and a PhD in economics from Stanford University in 1973.

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Recent Commentary

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Time to Get Growing

by John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, John B. Taylor, Kevin Warshvia Hoover Digest
Monday, October 23, 2017

Weak economic performance is not inevitable. 

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John Taylor Presentation And Q&A At Boston Fed

by John B. Taylorvia Cetus News
Monday, October 16, 2017

Stanford University economist John Taylor, a candidate to become the next chairman of the Federal Reserve, laid out his case for monetary policy rules at a Boston Fed conference.

Analysis and Commentary

New Results On International Monetary Policy Presented At The Swiss National Bank

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Friday, September 22, 2017

This week I gave the Swiss National Bank’s Annual Karl Brunner Lecture in Zurich, and I thank Thomas Jordan who introduced me and the hundreds of central bankers, bankers, and academics who filled the big auditorium. Karl was a brilliant, innovative economist who thought seriously about both policy ideas and institutions. For the lecture, I focused on ideas and institutions for international monetary policy.

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Still Learning From Milton Friedman: Version 3.0

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Monday, July 31, 2017

We can still learn much from Milton Friedman, as we celebrate his 105th birthday today. Here I consider what we can learn from his participation in the monetary policy debates in the 1960s and 1970s. I draw from a 2002 paper that I presented to lead off his 90th birthday celebration in Chicago in 2002 and from two 2012 pieces: a paper I presented at the centennial of his birth in 2012 and an article written on his 100th birthday in 2012.The lessons are very relevant to the debates raging during the last 15 years and continuing today.

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On The Prospects For Higher Economic Growth

by John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, John B. Taylor, Kevin Warshvia Analysis
Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Hoover and AEI economists release white paper on comprehensive economic policy reforms to achieve 3 percent growth.

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Debate Over The Very Principles Of Economics

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Monday, July 17, 2017

Today is the launch of the online version of my Economics 1 course (and namesake of this Blog and my Twitter handle) on the Principles of Economics for summer 2017. This year is also the tenth anniversary of the start of the Global Financial Crisis and the Great Recession which began in 2007.

Analysis and Commentary

Economics 1 Online. No Charge.

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Saturday, July 15, 2017

This summer I will be offering my Stanford course Principles of Economics online for free. You can find out more and register for the course, Economics 1, on Stanford’s open on-line platform Lagunita. The course starts at 8 am PT Monday July 17, when I will post the first week’s videos and reading material, and it goes through 11:59 pm PT September 18. It is possible to register and join the course at any time throughout this period.

Analysis and Commentary

A Whole New Section On Policy Rules In Fed’s Report

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Tuesday, July 11, 2017

The Federal Reserve Board’s semi-annual Monetary Policy Report issued by Chair Janet Yellen last Friday contains a whole new section called “Monetary Policy Rules and Their Role in the Federal Reserve’s Policy Process.” The section contains new information and is well worth reading..

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Seeing Through The Fog Of Federal Budget Forecasting

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Every summer since 2010 I’ve charted the latest Congressional Budget Office (CBO) long-term projection of the federal debt, noting the similarity with the Fourth of July fireworks. But during these years, the CBO has changed its procedures several times, fogging up comparisons over time and lessons from experience.

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Macro Model Comparison Research Takes Off

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Thursday, June 29, 2017

Last week a new Macroeconomic Modelling and Model Comparison Network (MMCN) was launched with a research conference at Goethe University Frankfurt. Economists from the IMF, the Fed, the ECB, and other central banks presented and compared policy models along with academics from Chicago, Penn, Amsterdam and elsewhere. Such collaboration and exchange will define the new network. Judging from the first conference, it got off to a good start.

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