Ruth Wedgwood

Ruth Wedgwood

Biography: 

Ruth Wedgwood is the Burling Professor of International Law at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. Earlier in her career, as a federal prosecutor in New York, she prosecuted a Soviet-bloc nuclear spy and weapons dealers’ shipping to Iraq and Iran. She also devised the innovative trial procedures first used in the Kampiles espionage case and later incorporated in the Classified Information Procedures Act. She has served on the Defense Policy Board, the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on International Law, and the CIA Historical Review Panel. She currently serves as the U.S. member of the United Nations Human Rights Committee in Geneva, reviewing the human rights record of countries such as Russia, Belarus, Libya, and Algeria. She was educated at Harvard, the London School of Economics, and Yale Law School and clerked on the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Recent Commentary

Complexities of CybersecurityFeatured Commentary

UN-THINKABLE: The United Nations Is Not The Place To Regulate The Internet

by Ruth Wedgwoodvia The Briefing
Monday, March 2, 2015

The United Nations is always looking for useful work — seeking to please 193 member states and find a way to collect their dues. But regulating the Internet is one case where Turtle Bay should keep its hands off the wheel.

Gavel

Shooting in the Air

by Ruth Wedgwoodvia American Interest
Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Russia’s operatives could be taken to the International Criminal Court for their role in the downing of flight MH17 over Ukraine. Even ICC skeptics in America ought to be open to this approach.
 

The Digital Age

Secrecy and Accountability in International Justice

by Ruth Wedgwoodvia The Briefing
Wednesday, January 29, 2014

In recent years, consumed by the war against al Qaeda, we have addressed secrecy and accountability in a homegrown way — concerned with information the American executive branch has kept to itself, what was shared with the Congress (though a transcript is often not made at the

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured Commentary

The Briefing: Secrecy and Accountability in International Justice

by Ruth Wedgwoodvia The Briefing
Thursday, January 23, 2014
In recent years, consumed by the war against al Qaeda, we have addressed secrecy and accountability in a homegrown way — concerned with information the American executive branch has kept to itself, what was shared with the Congress (though a transcript is often not made at the instance of both parties), and who should take the blame for things that go wrong.
Featured Commentary

The Briefing: President Obama’s Wartime Address

by Ruth Wedgwoodvia Advancing a Free Society
Wednesday, June 19, 2013
Guantanamo

President Obama’s Wartime Address

by Ruth Wedgwoodvia The Briefing
Monday, June 10, 2013

Rarely has an American president displayed the capacity to carve memorable phrases out of the oak wood of the English language.  Abraham Lincoln was one exception, reared on Shakespeare and the King James Bible, stump-trained through his peregrinating debates with Stephen A.

Featured Commentary

The Briefing: Gaza, the ICC and the Difficulties of American Cohabitation

by Ruth Wedgwoodvia Advancing a Free Society
Monday, February 4, 2013
Second Term Challenges

Gaza, the ICC and the Difficulties of American Cohabitation

by Ruth Wedgwoodvia The Briefing
Monday, February 4, 2013

One of the key principles of criminal law is that its substance and reach should be public and transparent.   But that’s not always the case with international criminal law—at least, not when the law is made on the hoof in a diplomatic rush.

Ban Ki-Moon’s Moment of Truth

by Ruth Wedgwoodvia National Review Online
Friday, August 10, 2012

There seems to be a moment in the life of every U.N. secretary general when he jumps without a parachute from the 38th floor.
 

Featured Commentary

Will U.N. Chief Ban Ki-Moon Do the Right Thing and Protect Iranian Dissidents?

by Ruth Wedgwood, Michael B. Mukaseyvia FoxNews.com
Thursday, September 22, 2011

The question is whether [Ban Ki-moon] has the fortitude and simple decency to act boldly and to save the lives of these unarmed men, women and children of Ashraf...

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