Terry Anderson

John and Jean De Nault Senior Fellow
Biography: 

Terry Anderson is the John and Jean De Nault Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the executive director of PERC (the Property and Environment Research Center), a think tank in Bozeman, Montana, that focuses on market solutions to environmental problems. His research helped launch the idea of free-market environmentalism and has prompted public debate over the proper role of government in managing natural resources. He was the cochair of Hoover's Property Rights, Freedom, and Prosperity Task Force.

Anderson is the author or editor of thirty-seven books. Among these, Free Market Environmentalism, coauthored with Donald Leal, received the 1992 Sir Antony Fisher International Memorial Award. A revised edition was published in 2001.

His most recent publication is Tapping Water Markets (RFF Press, 2012). Other books include Greener Than Thou: Are You Really an Environmentalist? (Hoover Institution Press, 2008) and Property Rights: A Practical Guide to Freedom and Prosperity (Hoover Institution Press, 2003), both coauthored with Laura Huggins. His book, with Peter J. Hill, The Not So Wild, Wild West: Property Rights on the Frontier (Stanford University Press), was awarded the 2005 Sir Antony Fisher International Memorial Award. Anderson’s research, which has also focused on Native American economies, recently resulted in a coedited volume, Self-Determination: The Other Path for Native Americans (Stanford University Press, 2006). He has published widely in both professional journals and the popular press, including the Wall Street Journal, the Christian Science Monitor, and Fly Fisherman.

In March 2011, Anderson received the Liberalni Institute Annual Award in Prague in the Czech Republic for his "Contribution to the Proliferation of Liberal Thinking, and Making Ideas of Liberty, Private Property, Competition, and the Rule of Law Come True.” Previous recipients include Nobel laureates Milton Friedman, Gary Becker, and Vernon Smith.

Anderson received his BS degree from the University of Montana in 1968 and his PhD degree in economics from the University of Washington in 1972, after which he began his teaching career at Montana State University, where he won several teaching awards.

Anderson is an avid outdoorsman who enjoys fishing, hiking, skiing, horseback riding, and archery hunting, especially in Africa.

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

The Native American Coal War

by Terry Andersonvia Forbes
Wednesday, May 18, 2016

When the Indian Wars ended after Custer’s demise at the Battle of the Little Big Horn, Native Americans found themselves relegated to reservations. Thereafter followed their next war, one to stave off poverty and protect what little wealth they had left.

Featured

Earth Day 2016: Let's Ditch The Doom And Gloom And Celebrate Our Improving Environment

by Terry Andersonquoting Carson Brunovia Fox News
Friday, April 22, 2016

Predictions of environmental gloom and doom meet us at every turn. At the entry of the Chicago Field Museum, for example, is a digital clock reporting “the number of species that have gone extinct since 8:00 this morning”—31 by 1 p.m. on March 27, 2016. Discussions of climate change almost always include terms such as catastrophic, irreversible, and irreparable. 

Featured CommentaryFeatured

Ending The California Coastal Commission Lolly Scramble

by Terry Andersonvia Eureka
Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Coming from the “big sky country” of Montana where beautiful views are common around every bend in the road, I am still impressed by the green hills overlooking Point Reyes, the coastal cliffs plunging into the Pacific at Big Sur, and the vistas at San Simeon once enjoyed by Randolph Hearst.

Featured

How To Create A National Park Without Taxpayers Footing The Bill

by Terry Anderson, Shawn Reganvia Bangor Daily News
Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Should the federal government create a national park in the North Woods? It’s a question that divides many in Maine. Some fear the effects of more federal control in the state. Others say a new park will bring economic growth to a depressed region.

Featured

How Is A Wolverine Like A Spotted Owl?

by Terry Andersonvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Environmentalists using the Endangered Species Act for political purposes find a new mascot.

Featured

Federal Land Management Has Been Disastrous

by Terry Andersonvia The New York Times
Thursday, January 7, 2016

Ryan Bundy, one of the leaders of the small group occupying the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, said the group's goal is to "restore the rights to people so they can use the land and resources," especially for ranching, logging, mining and recreation.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

How Hunting Saves Animals

by Terry Andersonvia Defining Ideas
Thursday, October 29, 2015

The story of a ranch in Africa shows that killing animals can actually be a form of conservation. 

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Climate Change And Human Ingenuity

by Terry Andersonvia Defining Ideas
Thursday, September 10, 2015

Yes, temperatures are slowly rising—but we should let the marketplace, not regulators, solve this problem.  

Analysis and Commentary

How Trophy Hunting Can Save Lions

by Terry Anderson, Shawn Reganvia The Wall Street Journal
Thursday, August 6, 2015

The revenues support the agencies that safeguard wildlife from poachers.

Green Allies

by Terry Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, June 19, 2015

What would bring conservationists and conservatives together? Environmental solutions that really work.

Pages