Terry Anderson

John and Jean De Nault Senior Fellow
Biography: 

Terry Anderson is the John and Jean De Nault Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the executive director of PERC (the Property and Environment Research Center), a think tank in Bozeman, Montana, that focuses on market solutions to environmental problems. His research helped launch the idea of free-market environmentalism and has prompted public debate over the proper role of government in managing natural resources. He was the cochair of Hoover's Property Rights, Freedom, and Prosperity Task Force.

Anderson is the author or editor of thirty-seven books. Among these, Free Market Environmentalism, coauthored with Donald Leal, received the 1992 Sir Antony Fisher International Memorial Award. A revised edition was published in 2001.

His most recent publication is Tapping Water Markets (RFF Press, 2012). Other books include Greener Than Thou: Are You Really an Environmentalist? (Hoover Institution Press, 2008) and Property Rights: A Practical Guide to Freedom and Prosperity (Hoover Institution Press, 2003), both coauthored with Laura Huggins. His book, with Peter J. Hill, The Not So Wild, Wild West: Property Rights on the Frontier (Stanford University Press), was awarded the 2005 Sir Antony Fisher International Memorial Award. Anderson’s research, which has also focused on Native American economies, recently resulted in a coedited volume, Self-Determination: The Other Path for Native Americans (Stanford University Press, 2006). He has published widely in both professional journals and the popular press, including the Wall Street Journal, the Christian Science Monitor, and Fly Fisherman.

In March 2011, Anderson received the Liberalni Institute Annual Award in Prague in the Czech Republic for his "Contribution to the Proliferation of Liberal Thinking, and Making Ideas of Liberty, Private Property, Competition, and the Rule of Law Come True.” Previous recipients include Nobel laureates Milton Friedman, Gary Becker, and Vernon Smith.

Anderson received his BS degree from the University of Montana in 1968 and his PhD degree in economics from the University of Washington in 1972, after which he began his teaching career at Montana State University, where he won several teaching awards.

Anderson is an avid outdoorsman who enjoys fishing, hiking, skiing, horseback riding, and archery hunting, especially in Africa.

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Recent Commentary

Featured

A Litmus Test For Trump's Public Land Policies

by Terry Andersonvia Forbes
Tuesday, January 10, 2017

After lecturing Trump on the abuse of executive power, President Obama exercised his executive power to set aside over 1.5 million acres as the Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah and Gold Butte National Monument near Las Vegas. These two monuments bring Obama’s total to 30, more than any other president.

Featured

Property Rights, Access And Neighborliness

by Terry Andersonvia Helena Independent Record
Tuesday, December 13, 2016

The U.S. Forest Service recently decided to reroute a road in the Bridger Mountains near Bozeman rather than engage in a costly court battle with a landowner to obtain a prescriptive easement across his property. For many access advocates, that rational agreement represents a slippery slope.

Analysis and Commentary

No Wonder The Standing Rock Sioux Opposed The Pipeline

by Terry Anderson, Shawn Reganvia National Review
Monday, December 12, 2016
Because of stifling federal regulations, they had no chance to benefit from it.
Featured

Presidential Medal Of Freedom Should Come With Freedom For American Indians

by Terry Andersonvia Forbes
Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Today, November 22, Blackfeet tribal leader Elouise Cobell will be among 21 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The White House announcement cites Cobell’s efforts to found the Native American Bank and her inspiration to Native American women as the reasons for the award, but her most notable legacy is the case of Cobell v. Salazar.

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The Wealth Of (Indian) Nations

by Terry Andersonvia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Many reservations are mired in poverty even though they sit on vast stores of natural resources.

Featured

Indian Energy Wars

by Terry Andersonvia Forbes
Thursday, October 6, 2016

Protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) are the latest Indian Wars. They pit Indian Nations against energy developers, tribes against tribes, and, tribes against the federal government, the last being the most formidable foe of all.

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Make Our National Parks Self-Sufficient

by Terry Andersonvia Defining Ideas
Thursday, September 1, 2016

Early on, the parks were managed autonomously and entrepreneurially—which is precisely what they need today to thrive. 

During his tenure as Secretary of Commerce from 1921 to 1928, Hoover debated with colleagues in the Department of the Interior over whether or not airports and scenic airplane rides should be allowed in national parks. By the late 1920s airports were bein
Featured

Happy 100th Birthday, National Parks

by Terry Andersonvia Wall Street Journal
Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Yellowstone could cover its operating budget with a daily fee of $11. Glacier could do so for $7.19.

Analysis and Commentary

The Native American Coal War

by Terry Andersonvia Forbes
Wednesday, May 18, 2016

When the Indian Wars ended after Custer’s demise at the Battle of the Little Big Horn, Native Americans found themselves relegated to reservations. Thereafter followed their next war, one to stave off poverty and protect what little wealth they had left.

Featured

Earth Day 2016: Let's Ditch The Doom And Gloom And Celebrate Our Improving Environment

by Terry Andersonquoting Carson Brunovia Fox News
Friday, April 22, 2016

Predictions of environmental gloom and doom meet us at every turn. At the entry of the Chicago Field Museum, for example, is a digital clock reporting “the number of species that have gone extinct since 8:00 this morning”—31 by 1 p.m. on March 27, 2016. Discussions of climate change almost always include terms such as catastrophic, irreversible, and irreparable. 

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