Victor Davis Hanson

Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
Statesmanship Award from the Claremont Institute
(2006)
Biography: 

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; his focus is classics and military history.

Hanson was a National Endowment for the Humanities fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California (1992–93), a visiting professor of classics at Stanford University (1991–92), the annual Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Visiting Fellow in History at Hillsdale College (2004–), the Visiting Shifron Professor of Military History at the US Naval Academy (2002–3),and the William Simon Visiting Professor of Public Policy at Pepperdine University (2010).

In 1991 he was awarded an American Philological Association Excellence in Teaching Award. He received the Eric Breindel Award for Excellence in Opinion Journalism (2002), presented the Manhattan's Institute's Wriston Lecture (2004), and was awarded the National Humanities Medal (2007) and the Bradley Prize (2008).

Hanson is the author of hundreds of articles, book reviews, and newspaper editorials on Greek, agrarian, and military history and essays on contemporary culture. He has written or edited twenty-three books, including The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost - from Ancient Greece to Iraq (Bloomsbury 2013); The End of Sparta (Bloomsbury, 2011); The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern (Bloomsbury, 2010); Makers of Ancient Strategy: From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome (ed.) (Princeton, 2010); The Other Greeks (California, 1998); The Soul of Battle (Free Press, 1999); Carnage and Culture (Doubleday, 2001); Ripples of Battle (Doubleday, 2003); A War Like No Other (Random House, 2005); The Western Way of War (Alfred Knopf, 1989; 2nd paperback ed., University of California Press, 2000); The Wars of the Ancient Greeks (Cassell, 1999; paperback ed., 2001); and Mexifornia: A State of Becoming (Encounter, 2003), as well as two books on family farming, Fields without Dreams (Free Press, 1995) and The Land Was Everything (Free Press, 1998). His forthcoming book entitled, The Second World Wars, will be out in Fall 2017 (Basic Books). Currently, he is a syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services and a weekly columnist for the National Review Online.

Hanson received a BA in classics at the University of California, Santa Cruz (1975), was a fellow at the American School of Classical Studies, Athens (1977–78), and received his PhD in classics from Stanford University (1980).

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Recent Commentary

Featured

The Strange Case Of Confederate Cool

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Leftists love Johnnie Reb in movies and songs. But statues? Not so much.

Featured

What If South Korea Acted Like North Korea?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, September 14, 2017

If it threatened to destroy its neighbor — China — the neighbor would act.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Diversity Can Spell Trouble

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Defining Ideas
Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Americans need to revive the idea of e pluribus unum.

Featured

Throwing Away The Russian Card

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, September 12, 2017

China has put the U.S. into an existential dilemma. Its surrogate North Korea — whose nuclear arsenal is certainly in large part a product of Chinese technology and commercial ties — by any standard of international standing is a failed, fourth-world state.

Featured

Beware Of Narratives And Misinformation

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, September 7, 2017

Narratives surrounding the DNC hack & Antifa reveal media bias and government bureaucracy at their worst.
 

Analysis and Commentary

A Little DACA Honesty

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Wednesday, September 6, 2017

It is surreal to look at more than a dozen clips of Barack Obama in non-campaign mode prior to 2012 assuring the country (“I am not king”) that he simply could not usurp the power of the Congress and by fiat illegally issue blanket amnesties in precisely the fashion he would in 2012 — presumably on the assumption that new polls worded along the lines of “would you deport small children brought by their parents to the country as infants” showed a majority of Americans would not.

Featured

Virtual Virtue

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Tuesday, September 5, 2017

It is not healthy for a society to live two lives that are antithetical, as America has been doing in recent decades.

Featured

Two Resistances

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, September 5, 2017

The quiet resistance — the one without black masks and clubs — is the more revolutionary force, and it transcends race, class, and gender.

Featured

Linguistic McCarthyism

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review Online
Thursday, August 31, 2017

‘The Bard,” William Shakespeare, had a healthy distrust of the sort of mob hysteria typified by our current epidemics of statue-busting and name-changing. In Shakespeare’s tragedy Julius Caesar — a story adopted from Plutarch’s Parallel Lives — a frenzied Roman mob, in furor over the assassination of Julius Caesar, encounters on the street a poet named Cinna. The innocent poet was not the conspiratorial assassin Cinna, but unfortunately shared a name with the killer.

Featured

Trump Haters, Supporters, Neither, And Both

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Partisan conflict is not new, nor is GOP internal dissent. What’s new is in-fighting among the elites.

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