Victor Davis Hanson

Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
Statesmanship Award from the Claremont Institute
(2006)
Biography: 

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; his focus is classics and military history.

Hanson was a National Endowment for the Humanities fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California (1992–93), a visiting professor of classics at Stanford University (1991–92), the annual Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Visiting Fellow in History at Hillsdale College (2004–), the Visiting Shifron Professor of Military History at the US Naval Academy (2002–3),and the William Simon Visiting Professor of Public Policy at Pepperdine University (2010).

In 1991 he was awarded an American Philological Association Excellence in Teaching Award. He received the Eric Breindel Award for Excellence in Opinion Journalism (2002), presented the Manhattan's Institute's Wriston Lecture (2004), and was awarded the National Humanities Medal (2007) and the Bradley Prize (2008).

Hanson is the author of some 250 articles, book reviews, and newspaper editorials on Greek, agrarian, and military history and essays on contemporary culture. He has written or edited twenty-three books, including The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost - from Ancient Greece to Iraq (Bloomsbury 2013); The End of Sparta (Bloomsbury, 2011); The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern (Bloomsbury, 2010); Makers of Ancient Strategy: From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome (ed.) (Princeton, 2010); The Other Greeks (California, 1998); The Soul of Battle (Free Press, 1999); Carnage and Culture (Doubleday, 2001); Ripples of Battle (Doubleday, 2003); A War Like No Other (Random House, 2005); The Western Way of War (Alfred Knopf, 1989; 2nd paperback ed., University of California Press, 2000); The Wars of the Ancient Greeks (Cassell, 1999; paperback ed., 2001); and Mexifornia: A State of Becoming (Encounter, 2003), as well as two books on family farming, Fields without Dreams (Free Press, 1995) and The Land Was Everything (Free Press, 1998). Currently, he is a syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services and a weekly columnist for the National Review Online and PJ Media.

Hanson received a BA in classics at the University of California, Santa Cruz (1975), was a fellow at the American School of Classical Studies, Athens (1977–78), and received his PhD in classics from Stanford University (1980).

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Featured Commentary

The Obama Administration’s Chicago Politics

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, July 28, 2015

“If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun.” Barack Obama is the first American president from Chicago. That fact will be the trailblazing Obama’s most lasting legacy.

Blogs

Donald Trump And The Fed-Up Crowd

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Works and Days
Sunday, July 26, 2015

Watching Trump’s rise, America’s middle class “fed-up crowd” is enjoying the comeuppance of an elite that never pays for the ramifications of its own ideology.

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Obama’s Dangerous Rhetoric

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Defining Ideas
Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Our enemies do not believe the president’s hot air, which will only make the world a more dangerous place. 

Featured Commentary

The Way Of All Appeasement

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Wednesday, July 22, 2015

The now-concluded Iran nuclear negotiations predictably reflect ancient truths of appeasement. While members of the Obama administration are high-fiving each other over a deal with the Iranian theocracy, they should remember unchanging laws that will surely haunt the U.S. later on.

Barack Obama
Featured Commentary

Obama And Trump: Two Of A Kind

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, July 21, 2015

President Obama is said to feel liberated, in the sense that he can finally say what, and do as, he pleases — without much worry any more over political ramifications, including presidential and congressional elections.

Blogs

San Francisco: One Sick Sanctuary City

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Works and Days
Sunday, July 19, 2015

As is true daily in other sanctuary cities, San Francisco rolled the dice with someone else’s safety, resulting in the murder of Kate Steinle.

Victor Davis Hanson
Featured Commentary

Contrary To Progressive Belief, Human Nature Can't Be Changed

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Human nature is unchanging, predictable -- and can be dangerous if ignored. Five-time deportee and seven-time felon Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, an unauthorized immigrant, recently was arrested in San Francisco for the murder of an innocent passerby, Kate Steinle.

Featured Commentary

The Four Horsemen Of A Looming Apocalypse

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, July 14, 2015

The U.S. and its allies are faced with four major threats, and they are as diverse and yet as akin as the proverbial apocalyptic horsemen.

Blogs

Want Him To Enforce Laws That Would Have Kept Kate Steinle Alive? Governor Jerry Brown Thinks You’re ‘Troglodyte’

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Works and Days
Monday, July 13, 2015

Let's examine the issues rationally, and see who actually understood the Age of Reason.

Featured Commentary

Disregard For The Law Is America's Greatest Threat

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Barbarians at the gate usually don't bring down once-successful civilizations. Nor does climate change. Even mass epidemics like the plague that decimated sixth-century Byzantium do not necessarily destroy a culture.

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