Victor Davis Hanson

Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
Statesmanship Award from the Claremont Institute
(2006)
Biography: 

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; his focus is classics and military history.

Hanson was a National Endowment for the Humanities fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California (1992–93), a visiting professor of classics at Stanford University (1991–92), the annual Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Visiting Fellow in History at Hillsdale College (2004–), the Visiting Shifron Professor of Military History at the US Naval Academy (2002–3),and the William Simon Visiting Professor of Public Policy at Pepperdine University (2010).

In 1991 he was awarded an American Philological Association Excellence in Teaching Award. He received the Eric Breindel Award for Excellence in Opinion Journalism (2002), presented the Manhattan's Institute's Wriston Lecture (2004), and was awarded the National Humanities Medal (2007) and the Bradley Prize (2008).

Hanson is the author of hundreds of articles, book reviews, and newspaper editorials on Greek, agrarian, and military history and essays on contemporary culture. He has written or edited twenty-three books, including The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost - from Ancient Greece to Iraq (Bloomsbury 2013); The End of Sparta (Bloomsbury, 2011); The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern (Bloomsbury, 2010); Makers of Ancient Strategy: From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome (ed.) (Princeton, 2010); The Other Greeks (California, 1998); The Soul of Battle (Free Press, 1999); Carnage and Culture (Doubleday, 2001); Ripples of Battle (Doubleday, 2003); A War Like No Other (Random House, 2005); The Western Way of War (Alfred Knopf, 1989; 2nd paperback ed., University of California Press, 2000); The Wars of the Ancient Greeks (Cassell, 1999; paperback ed., 2001); and Mexifornia: A State of Becoming (Encounter, 2003), as well as two books on family farming, Fields without Dreams (Free Press, 1995) and The Land Was Everything (Free Press, 1998). His forthcoming book entitled, The Second World Wars, will be out in Fall 2017 (Basic Books). Currently, he is a syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services and a weekly columnist for the National Review Online.

Hanson received a BA in classics at the University of California, Santa Cruz (1975), was a fellow at the American School of Classical Studies, Athens (1977–78), and received his PhD in classics from Stanford University (1980).

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The End Of Identity Politics

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Defining Ideas (Hoover Institution)
Friday, February 17, 2017

Trump signals the eclipse of the diversity industry and a yearning for a more unified America.

Featured

The Three-Headed Hydra Of The Middle East

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Trump has inherited a matrix of problems that primarily stem from Iran, Russia, and ISIS.

Featured

The Oroville Dam Disaster Is Yet Another Example Of California's Decline

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Los Angeles Times
Tuesday, February 14, 2017

A year ago, politicians and experts were predicting a near-permanent statewide drought, a “new normal” desert climate. The most vivid example of how wrong they were is that California’s majestic Oroville Dam is currently in danger of spillway failure in a season of record snow and rainfall. 

Analysis and Commentary

Tear Down This Dam?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia The Hill
Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Oroville dam, the tallest in the nation, is currently in danger of structural failure.

Featured

The Uses Of Populism

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, February 14, 2017

The economy, academia, immigration, and the environment could benefit from Trump’s unorthodox approach. 

The Deplorables Shout Back

by Victor Davis Hanson
Monday, February 13, 2017

Struggling rural America proved disenchanted with the country’s trajectory into something like a continental version of Belgium or the Netherlands: borderless, with a global rather than national sense of self; identity politics in lieu of unity and assimilation; a statist and ossified economy with a few winners moralizing to lots of losers—perhaps as a way of alleviating transitory guilt over their own privilege.

Analysis and Commentary

The Deplorables Shout Back

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Monday, February 13, 2017

Struggling rural America proved disenchanted with the country’s trajectory into something like a continental version of Belgium or the Netherlands: borderless, with a global rather than national sense of self; identity politics in lieu of unity and assimilation; a statist and ossified economy with a few winners moralizing to lots of losers—perhaps as a way of alleviating transitory guilt over their own privilege.

Featured

California Goes Confederate

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review Online
Thursday, February 9, 2017

Over sixty percent of California voters went for Hillary Clinton -- a margin of more than 4 million votes over Donald Trump.

Featured

Make Haste — Deliberately

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, February 7, 2017

If Trump shows that his actions are a reaction to past extremes, his changes will win public support.

Why Is Returning To Normalcy Revolutionary?

by Victor Davis Hanson
Sunday, February 5, 2017

By 2008, America was politically split nearly 50/50 as it had been in 2004 and 2000. The Democrats took a gamble and nominated Barack Obama, who became the first young, Northern, liberal president since John F. Kennedy narrowly won in 1960.

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