Tuesday, July 1, 2003

2003 No. 3

Staying the Course

by Kenneth R. Timmermanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Removing Saddam Hussein from power might turn out to have been a cakewalk compared to the challenge ahead—making Iraq democratic. By Kenneth R. Timmerman.

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Democracy? In Iraq?

by Chappell Lawson, Strom C. Thackervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

The short-term prospects for democracy in Iraq are mixed at best. Yet there are things we can do to improve the odds. By Hoover national fellows Chappell Lawson and Strom C. Thacker.

Rumsfeld's War

How Iraq Was Won

by Bruce Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

The armchair generals were wrong and Donald Rumsfeld was right. Bruce Berkowitz on the new face of warfare.

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The Press Goes to War

by Jeffrey C. Blissvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Embedding reporters in military units reduced the “cynicism, general distrust, and enmity” that had marked relations between the Pentagon and the press for three decades. Hoover associate director Jeffrey C. Bliss on the first new approach to relations between the military and the media since Vietnam.SIDEBAR: Journalists and War

What We Learned

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

A military historian discusses the lessons we learned—or need to learn—from the conflict in Iraq. By Victor Davis Hanson.

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“America, Non!”

by Russell A. Bermanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

The epicenter of anti-Americanism? Not the Islamic world, but Europe. By Russell A. Berman.

The Real New Europe

by Timothy Garton Ashvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Political tensions between Europe and the United States notwithstanding, the “New Europe” is more American than ever. By Timothy Garton Ash.

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Patching Things Up

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Anti-Americanism is surging around the world. Hoover fellow Larry Diamond explains how to win back hearts and minds.

Liberty First

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Why the stakes for George Bush’s “liberty doctrine” couldn’t be higher. By Michael McFaul.

Time to Leave South Korea

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Why it makes sense for U.S. forces to leave Korea’s demilitarized zone. By Thomas Henriksen.

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Showdown

by Alice L. Millervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

North Korea’s determination to develop nuclear weapons is the greatest threat the United States now faces. Hoover fellow Alice Lyman Miller explains how—and why—the Bush administration must respond.

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Why El Jefe Cracked Down

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Fidel Castro may look like a blundering madman, but instead he’s calculating and entirely rational. Hoover fellow William Ratliff on a tyrant who “knows exactly what he is doing.”

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Learning at Home

by Richard Sousa, Hanna Skanderavia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Home education is the fastest growing alternative to public schooling—and a good one at that. By Hoover fellows Hanna Skandera and Richard Sousa.

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Our Schools Are Still at Risk

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

The nation’s leading proponents of education reform met recently at a Hoover Institution conference in Washington to address two critical questions: How bad are our schools—and how can we fix them? A report by Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell.

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Beware the Language Police!

by Diane Ravitchvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

How the language police have gained control of our students’ textbooks. By Diane Ravitch.

Lessons Learned in the Sunshine State

by Jeb Bushvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Schools in the Sunshine State are getting better. Why? Because the state has begun holding them accountable. Jeb Bush, the governor of Florida, explains.

Diagnosis: Critical

by Scott W. Atlasvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

How can we fix the nation’s health care system? By giving it a dose of the free market. By Scott W. Atlas.

“Safety Net” Semantics

by Jeffrey M. Jonesvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

As President Clinton put it, the reform of 1996 marked “the end of welfare as we know it.” What has taken its place? Hoover public affairs fellow Jeffrey Jones on coming to grips with a new kind of welfare.

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The Rise of the Russian Criminal State

by David Sattervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

During the decade following the fall of communism, Russia became mired in poverty and crime. Hoover fellow David Satter explains what went wrong.

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Loudmouth

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Remembering Nikita Khrushchev, the crude, poorly educated peasant who laid the groundwork for the eventual collapse of the Soviet Union. By Robert Conquest.

General Patrick Hurley.

Hurley’s Dream

by Abbas Milanivia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

How FDR almost brought democracy to Iran. By Abbas Milani.

Arnold Beichman, June 2003

Beichman at 90

by Kathryn Jean Lopezvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

A Cold War warrior talks about his first nine decades. Interview by Kathryn Jean Lopez.

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The Happy Cold Warrior

by David Brooksvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Arnold Beichman at 90. A celebration by Hoover media fellow David Brooks.

The illiterate man is like a blind man.

The Illiterate Man Is Like a Blind Man

by Heather Farkas, Mathew Morrisvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Soviet posters from the literacy campaign of the 1920s. By Heather Farkas and Matthew Morris.