Saturday, October 1, 2005

2005 No. 4

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Iran’s New President

by Abbas Milanivia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

How can we deal with the nuclear threat from Iran? By encouraging democracy in Iran. By Abbas Milani.

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The Gaza Pullout

by Robert Zelnickvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

The Israeli withdrawal from Gaza represented a dramatic new development. But the more things change, the more they stay the same. Robert Zelnick reports on the new—and old—realities of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Did Success Spoil the Tories?

by Gerald A. Dorfmanvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

After 18 years of uninterrupted power, life by 1997 must have seemed rosy for Britain’s Conservatives. Then they were booted from office. Is Labour walking down the same primrose path? By Gerald A. Dorfman.

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Back in the USSR

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

Crowded Internet cafes dot the new urban landscapes of St. Petersburg and Moscow, yet Russians still yearn for the terrible simplicity of the old days. Niall Ferguson explains.

Alexander Yakovlev, RIP

by David Sattervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

After helping to bring about the collapse of the Soviet Union, Alexander Yakovlev became the conscience of the new Russian state. Russia has lost its moral leader—when it needs him most. By David Satter.

The False Promise of Autocratic Stability

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

He rules Uzbekistan with an iron fist, and now he’s cozying up to Russia and China. Why it’s time for the United States to wash its hands of Islam Karimov. By Michael McFaul.

High Hopes—and High Anxiety

by John Raisianvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

Economic growth and prosperity in East Asia have proven stupendous, yet security in the region represents a perennial worry. How Washington should navigate the tricky geometry of the Asian Triangle. By John Raisian.

Chords of Memory

by Dennis L. Barkvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

The uncertain nature of the European-American relationship in these distinctly uncertain times. By Dennis l. Bark.

National Security: A Better Approach

by Kori Schake, Bruce Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

How can we reform our dysfunctional national security system? By letting the White House call the shots. By Bruce Berkowitz and Kori Schake.

The Rogues Are Losing

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

Why the rogues of the Middle East have a very short future. By Charles Hill.

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Development and Democracy

by Bruce Bueno de Mesquitavia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

Economic growth and democracy don’t always go hand in hand. Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and George W. Downs explain why.

Giving Peace a Chance

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

Can the new century prove an age of peace? Niall Ferguson considers the question by examining conflict in three of the last century’s hot spots: Bosnia, Guatemala, and Cambodia.

Dubya and the Roiled Right

by Clark S. Judgevia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

By failing to fight for a domestic agenda, the president has given his core supporters little reason to stand by him—and numerous reasons to drift. By Clark S. Judge.

Witness

by Shelby Steelevia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

Racism cannot explain the images of deep black poverty that emerged in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. If Katrina was a wake-up call for government, it was also a wake-up call for black America. By Shelby Steele.

Washington’s War on AIDS

via Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

The biggest weapon in the global war on AIDS? Money. President Bush has pledged $15 billion—the largest contribution from any nation in history to combat a single disease. By Jonathan Moore.

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The Twilight of Socialized Medicine?

by Jeffrey M. Jonesvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

Medicaid is gravely ill. The best place to look for a cure? The marketplace. By Jeffrey M. Jones.

Be Afraid

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

The avian flu is already responsible for more than 60 human deaths. If it mutates into a virus transmissible between humans—a real possibility—we could see a worldwide pandemic. How to fight the flu. By Henry I. Miller.

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Reforming Malpractice Liability

by Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

The medical liability system functions less like a rational compensation scheme and more like a lottery. How to take luck out of the equation. By Daniel P. Kessler.

The Nuclear Option

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

It’s time to go nuclear. Gary S. Becker explains.

Stalin the Terrible

by Robert Servicevia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

“Stalin the mass killer slept easily at night. Not for him the uneasiness of wearing the crown of state: he adored power.” Robert Service on the face of evil.

Fascism—an “Ism” of the Left, not the Right

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

A fascist White House? Get serious. By Arnold Beichman.

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When Goodness Won

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

The recently published KGB file of Andrei Sakharov shows the extent to which he was oppressed—and the magnitude of his heroism. By Robert Conquest.

In-Your-Sleep Moralizing

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

The United States may make an easy target for Amnesty International, the United Nations, and the Europeans. But it’s our military that protects Western civilization. By Victor Davis Hanson.

What Rosa Parks Meant

by Jeffrey C. Blissvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

Rosa Parks sparked a great movement. Jeff Bliss on the “power of one.”

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Revolutionary Eye: The Political Education of Wolfgang Janisch

by Bradley Bauervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

Looking at the world around him in the 1970s and ’80s, East German artist Wolfgang Janisch saw much to protest: the East German communist dictatorship, the nuclear arms race, and rampant environmental destruction. How a humble man with an ordinary life began making extraordinary art—and helped bring down the Berlin Wall. By Brad Bauer.