Friday, July 2, 2010

2010 No. 3

Paid for with IOUs

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

The cost of overhauling health care is going to go much, much higher than we’ve been led to suppose. By Thomas Sowell.

Debt Roulette

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

The Obama budget represents the biggest gamble in our entire fiscal history. By Michael J. Boskin.

You’re Hired! Eventually . . .

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

A rising economy is the only thing that will help the long-term jobless. By Gary S. Becker.

How to Feed a Recovery

by John B. Taylor, Jennifer Schonbergervia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

The economy is regaining strength, says Hoover fellow John B. Taylor, and government regulators should keep their distance, not interfere. By Jennifer Schonberger.

Postpartisan Preening

by Harvey C. Mansfieldvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

“Beyond politics,” the latest mantra in Washington, is at best astoundingly naive. By Harvey C. Mansfield.

Herbal Supplements, the New Snake Oil

by Henry I. Miller, David Longtinvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

They don’t have to prove they’re pure, effective, or even safe. Let’s fix that. By Henry I. Miller and David Longtin.

Fat Taxes, or Just Fat?

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Should we try to tax away obesity—and its supposed costs—by targeting sodas, fast food, and video games? No. By Gary S. Becker.

Leave the Cameras to Judge Judy

by Diana Schaubvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

The drama in the Supreme Court is too important—and complex—to treat like entertainment. By Diana Schaub.

A Vendetta Averted

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

In refusing to punish the authors of the so-called torture memos, the Justice Department did the right thing. Public servants deserve immunity. By Richard A. Epstein.

Only a START

by William J. Perry, George P. Shultzvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Now Washington and Moscow must use the latest disarmament treaty to keep pushing for a safer world. By William J. Perry and George P. Shultz.

Trials and Tribulations

by Benjamin Wittes, Jack Goldsmithvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Since Khalid Sheik Muhammad, the accused terrorist mastermind, is already in prison, why bother putting him on trial at all? By Benjamin Wittes and Jack Goldsmith.

Let the Charters Bloom

by Paul E. Petersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Why failing schools should be allowed to fail—and better schools to sprout in their place. By Paul E. Peterson.

The Case for Saturday School

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

When it comes to instruction time, longer is better. American schools, however, are going the other way. By Chester E. Finn Jr.

Advancing Democracy Abroad

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

It’s imperfect, sometimes difficult even to define. But democracy works, and people want it. From a new book by Hoover fellow Michael McFaul.

Honesty for Hire

by Kris Mitchener, Noel Maurervia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

A few countries have found a way to stop graft and foster political stability: hire foreigners to collect their revenue. By Kris James Mitchener and Noel Maurer.

Tehran Has Won Nothing

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

As the American mission in Iraq enters another year, the biggest loser (besides Saddam) is Iran. By Victor Davis Hanson.

The Enemy of the Good

by Fouad Ajamivia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

The recent Iraqi elections weren’t perfect, but they didn’t have to be. Democracy is emerging—and for now, that’s enough. By Fouad Ajami.

The Good Ayatollah

by Abbas Milanivia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

The Islamic Revolution first raised up, then cast down, Grand Ayatollah Hossein Ali Montazeri. Homage to an uncorrupted man. By Abbas Milani.

Doctor Mitchell’s Talking Cure

by Josef Joffevia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

U.S. envoys are orchestrating “proximity talks”—another proposal for Mideast peace that’s going nowhere fast. By Josef Joffe.

Veiled Threat?

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

France may have a case for banning the burqa. By Peter Berkowitz.

How to Defeat the Drug Lords at Last

by Lieutenant Colonel Don Chipmanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Colombia has made remarkable progress against narcotraffickers. So could Mexico. By Donald C. Chipman.

Let’s Call It an Indefinite Furlough

by Abraham D. Sofaervia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Lawmakers have all but bankrupted the Golden State. Californians need a way to fire every one of them. By Abraham D. Sofaer.

Robert Service’s Five Books

by Daisy Banksvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

The Hoover fellow talks about the works that informed his understanding of history. By Daisy Banks.

“Markets Are Hard to Appreciate”

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker is convinced that Americans don’t really want to go backwards on economic liberty. By Peter Robinson.

Fighting Clean

by Tunku Varadarajanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Kenneth Starr as peacemaker? The former special prosecutor offers Hoover fellow Tunku Varadarajan a bracing defense of political civility.

Martyred for Communism

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Nikolai Bukharin, a victim of Stalin’s show trials, believed that he and the Soviet revolution would one day be vindicated. But the future discarded them both. By Paul R. Gregory.

How Milton Friedman Saved Chile

by Bret Stephensvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Unjustly defamed as an ally of dictators, the late Hoover fellow helped foster the economic dynamism that Chile will use to rebuild. By Bret Stephens.

Arnold Beichman Marches On

by John Podhoretzvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

A tribute to the late Hoover fellow—journalist, anticommunist, enthusiast of life and the American experiment. By John Podhoretz.

The Russia Option

by Paul H. Taivia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Moscow once offered Chiang Kai-shek a chance to smash his enemies. Why did he refuse? By Paul H. Tai.

Quantum Leaps to Hiroshima

by Bertrand M. Patenaudevia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 2, 2010

Glimpses into the world of the celebrated thinkers who brought the atomic age to life. By Bertrand M. Patenaude.