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Analysis and Commentary

E-Residency In Estonia, Part II: Wherein I Visit The Estonian Embassy, Collect My Digital Identity Card, And Interview Kristjan Kuurme

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Thursday, February 11, 2016

I know that many Lawfare readers have been waiting with baited breath—the suspense unbearable—to find out what happens next in my quest for Estonian digital residency. (See here, here, here, and here for prior episodes in this drama.) Well, your suffering is at an end. Today, at 2 pm, I rang the doorbell of the Estonian Embassy in Washington and met with Kristjan Kuurme, Third Secretary—Political Affairs, who issued me my card.

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Return of U.S. Forces to Europe: Back to the Future

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Military History in the News
Thursday, February 11, 2016

The Russian bear is waking up from hibernation and looking for neighbors to eat. Vladimir Putin’s seizure of Crimea and his support for insurgents in eastern Ukraine have other Eastern European countries—primarily the Baltic States and Poland—worried. Putin would like to see the North Atlantic Treaty Organization humiliated for the cardinal sin in his eyes of poaching countries in the Russian sphere of influence after the collapse of the Commonwealth of Independent States in 1991.

Interviews

Michael McFaul On AmbasciataUSA Live Stream

interview with Michael McFaulvia YouTube
Thursday, February 11, 2016

Hoover Institution fellow Michael McFaul discusses the US-Russia relationship.

middle east
Featured

The Impending "Humanitarian Catastrophe" In Aleppo

by Jack Goldsmithvia Lawfare
Wednesday, February 10, 2016

As the Russian-backed Aleppo offensive proceeds, State Department official Brett McGurk testified today that Aleppo is on the verge of “a humanitarian catastrophe.” In the face of that catastrophe, allied complaints about U.S. disengagement and cries at home for U.S. intervention grow louder. 

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Analysis and Commentary

David Cameron’s Gamble Is Paying Off

by Josef Joffevia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, February 9, 2016

The prime minister knows the European Union can’t afford to lose Britain.

World Puzzle
In the News

Drell Lecture: Dr. William J. Perry On "A National Security Walk Around The World"

featuring William J. Perry, Sidney D. Drellvia Stanford News
Wednesday, February 10, 2016

The Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) is honored to offer the 2016 Drell Lecture with Dr. William J. Perry, 19th U.S. Secretary of Defense, who will take attendees on "A National Security Walk Around the World."

Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen.
In the News

Fed Chair Yellen To Testify On Hill Amid Growing Doubts Over Interest Rate Hikes

quoting Kevin Warshvia The Washington Post
Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen will appear before Congress on Wednesday for the first time since raising interest rates, and investors will be scrutinizing her remarks for signs of whether the central bank will continue pulling back its support for the nation’s economic recovery.

Analysis and Commentary

New York Times Editorial: Sweden Should "Walk Away" From Rape Case

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Monday, February 8, 2016

There's a headline I never expected to write. Among my many criticisms of the New York Times editorial page, after all, I would never until today have accused it of being soft on sexual violence.

Interviews

Kori Schake: Why Is The United States More Afraid Of The Islamic State Than Russia?

interview with Kori Schakevia Foreign Policy
Monday, February 8, 2016

Hoover Institution fellow Kori Schake discusses the threat of Russia’s growing influence and whether Western powers — namely, the Obama administration — are doing enough to quash potential problems ahead, opting instead to focus on threats like the Islamic State.

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The Predictable Failure Of The Syrian Peace Talks

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Military History in the News
Monday, February 8, 2016

The failure, ahem, suspension this week of United Nations sponsored talks in Geneva aimed at stopping the carnage in Syria was all too predictable. The talks were initially delayed by the inability of Syrian opposition groups to agree on who should get a seat at the table. Then after just five days of negotiations, the negotiators realized what should have been apparent from the start—an end to the Syrian civil war is highly unlikely absent conditions on the battlefield conducive to a negotiated settlement. What are those conditions?

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