North America

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Authors

Use comma-separated ID numbers for each author
The Libertarian: Audio
Blank Section (Placeholder)

The Libertarian: “A Libertarian Moment in American Politics?”

by Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Is classical liberalism coming back into style?

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured Commentary

Setting Krugman Straight

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

The Times columnist's depiction of libertarian principles is a crude caricature.

Podcast: The Libertarian: “A Libertarian Moment in American Politics?”
Other Media

Poll: Common Core Support Among Teachers Plummets, With Fewer Than Half Supporting It

quoting Paul E. Petersonvia The Washington Post
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Anybody watching the escalating battle across the country over the Common Core State Standards and aligned standardized testing will hardly be surprised by a new national poll which reveals a significant loss of support over the last year — especially among teachers, whose approval rating dropped from 76 percent  in 2013 to only  46 percent in 2014. Overall support for the Core dropped from 65 percent last year to 53 percent in 2014, with most of the defection among Republicans.

Other Media

Conservative Study Finds Falling Support for 'Common Core'

featuring Paul E. Petersonvia The Hill
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Public support for Common Core, the Obama administration’s program for setting education standards, has dwindled over the last year, according to a new study from a conservative group. The survey from Education Next, a journal published by the conservative Hoover Institution, found that 53 percent of people still favor Common Core, but the program’s support has declined sharply from 65 percent in 2013.

Blogs

Political Polarization Needlessly Divides the Public on Common Core and NCLB

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Political polarization is making it increasingly difficult to sustain support for policy undertakings that a majority of the public supports. Narrow interest groups and small minorities are twisting public opinion through slogans and rhetoric to which sensation-mongering elements in the media are giving excessive attention. Such is my conclusion after reviewing eight years of Education Next (Ednext) polling on No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Featured Commentary

The Public Turns Against Teacher Tenure

by Paul E. Petersonvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

It's back-to-school season, but teacher tenure has been a hot topic since summer began. In June a California court ruled that the state's tenure and seniority laws are unconstitutional in Vergara v. State of California. Minority students have filed a similar case in New York, with more to come elsewhere.

Featured Commentary

Never An Excuse for Shooting Unarmed Suspects, Former Police Chief Says

by Joseph D. McNamaravia Reuters
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

I was the police chief in Kansas City, Missouri, when an unarmed African-American teenager was shot by a cop for a non-violent issue. The result was a peaceful and constructive public dialogue — the opposite of what is happening now in Ferguson, Missouri, in the aftermath of the shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old.

Featured Commentary

Terry Anderson on the Environment and Property Rights

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, August 18, 2014

Terry Anderson, Distinguished Fellow at the Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, talks to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about free-market environmentalism, the dynamics of the Yellowstone ecosystem, and how property rights can protect natural resources.

Blogs

Granite Brown?

by Bill Whalenvia A Day At The Races
Monday, August 18, 2014

Regardless of whether he wins or loses this fall’s Senate contest in New Hampshire, Republican Scott Brown is looking at history.

Featured Commentary

Is Segregation The Problem in Ferguson?

by Jonathan Roddenvia The Washington Post
Monday, August 18, 2014

Over the last few days, punditry about Ferguson, Mo., has converged on a common, well-rehearsed narrative about segregation in St. Louis that goes back to the 19th century: whites will do whatever it takes to prevent blacks from moving into their neighborhoods, including redlining, restrictive covenants, large-lot zoning, intimidation and violence. When these ultimately fail, whites build new interstates and move en masse to the next ring of undeveloped farmland, leaving behind destitute neighborhoods with no investment or opportunity.

Pages