Arctic Security Working Group

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Analysis and Commentary

The Arctic Is The First Stop In The United States Reset With Russia

by Mark E. Rosenvia National Interest
Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Throughout the primaries President elect Donald Trump asserted that he wanted to have a more constructive relationship with Russia. Trump correctly asserted that President Vladimir Putin was not someone that the United States could pretend didn’t exist because he both loves his country and is enormously popular with his own people.

Analysis and Commentary

Russia’s Arctic Dreams Have Chinese Characteristics

by Jeremy Maxie, Commander David Slaytonvia The National Bureau Of Asian Research
Wednesday, October 19, 2016

The most significant geophysical event on our planet since the end of the ice age is taking place today—the opening of the Arctic.

Arctic as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E

Arctic no rival to Suez, not this century, says shipping expert

by Lawson W. Brigham
Wednesday, October 7, 2015

As the ice retreats, Arctic shipping is expected to increase. But if your idea of “Arctic shipping” is cargo carriers navigating a shortcut between Europe and Asia, you may want to choose a different image.

In the News

Searching For Leads In The Opening Arctic

quoting Admiral Gary Rougheadvia Foreign Policy
Monday, September 14, 2015

Disappearing ice, Russia’s newest land grab, and a new great game at the top of the world. An FP special report.

Featured

Why US Must Keep A Close Eye On Russia's Plans For The Arctic

by Commander David Slayton, Katarzyna Zyskvia Fox News
Friday, August 28, 2015

“The North Pole is Ours!” read the headline of Rossiiskaya Gazeta -- the Russian government daily newspaper of record -- on May 20. In today’s circumstances of heightened tensions with the West, Vladimir Putin needs victories, which may also make the country less pragmatic and more concerned about identity politics and symbols.

Analysis and Commentary

Strengthen Arctic Cooperation Between The US And China

by Commander David Slaytonvia Alaska Dispatch News
Thursday, August 27, 2015

The China-U.S. relationship is a daily and recurring, sometimes dominant, news story. Select news has been positive and indicates close collaboration, such as the November 2014 joint announcement on climate and energy initiatives.

Featured

In The Race For Arctic Energy, The U.S. And Russia Are Polar Opposites

by Admiral Gary Rougheadvia The Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, August 25, 2015

The Obama administration dithers while Moscow—with China close behind—revs up offshore oil production.

In the News

Ensure Sovereignty, Access, Security In Arctic

by David Titleyvia Defense News
Monday, May 18, 2015

Last week, the US became chair of the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental forum for the eight Arctic nations and observer nations as distant from the Arctic as India and Singapore. Most Americans think of Alaska when they think about the Arctic but do not fully appreciate how important the Arctic is to our nation's future. For many decades, the Arctic was primarily a frozen haven for indigenous peoples, polar bears, seals and submarines. But as the Arctic warms at a rate twice that of the rest of the planet, it is becoming more and more accessible to human activity — and that will affect the world's geopolitics and its climate. A region where most assets had been frozen is rapidly become a dash for resources, access and influence.

In the News

Russia, U.S. Need To Cooperate In The Arctic

by Commander David Slayton, Lawson W. Brigham via Investors Business Daily
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Russia is in the news again. NATO ministers continue to discuss how to upgrade their response capabilities to contain Russia, an increasingly unpredictable neighbor. Pentagon officials advise Congress that Russia is a top military threat. Meanwhile, President Putin ramps up his military modernization. Could this finally be the end of strong Russia-U.S. cooperation in the one region where our interests have aligned since the end of the Cold War: the Arctic?

Analysis and Commentary

Russia And US Must Maintain Arctic Relations In An Interconnected World

by Commander David Slayton, Lawson W. Brigham via Alaska Dispatch News
Sunday, May 10, 2015

Russia is in the news, again. NATO ministers continue to discuss how to upgrade their response capabilities to contain Russia, an increasingly unpredictable neighbor, and Pentagon officials advise Congress that Russia is a primary military threat. Could this finally be the end of strong Russia-U.S. cooperation in the one region where our interests have aligned since the end of the Cold War: the Arctic?

Pages

Cooperation 66 Degrees North

Thursday, May 8, 2014 to Friday, May 9, 2014
Tromsø, Norway

Cooperation 66 Degrees North is a two-day Arctic maritime and security forum. It is partly funded by the Norwegian Barents Secretariat and designed to enhance communication, cooperation, and collaboration across political, economic, and security sectors throughout the circumpolar region and beyond. In particular, it focuses on fostering frank discourse about security, safety, and operational/legal challenges in the maritime and offshore sectors of the High North.

Event
Arctic Security Initiative meeting.

Arctic Security Initiative meeting

Monday, August 19, 2013

On August 15, the Arctic Security Initiative convened a Technology Working Group of policy and technical experts to discuss the continuing challenges of operating in the Arctic, one of a series focused on how best to help policy makers understand both the importance and the challenges of the US Arctic region.

News
Arctic as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E

The Opening Arctic - Challenges and Opportunities

Monday, June 10, 2013

The most significant physical event on our planet since the end of the Ice Age is taking place today: the opening of the Arctic. Activity in the high north will increase. Fish stocks will migrate, and pursuing fishing fleets will thus move farther north. Access to natural resources will expand. New maritime shipping routes can reduce shipping times and costs and accelerate ties among commercial centers. Indigenous populations will be affected profoundly and rapidly.

News
USS Honolulu submarine and polar bears on the sea ice of the Arctic Ocean, near

The Hoover Institution’s Arctic Security Initiative

Monday, May 6, 2013

In an ongoing effort to solve the problems of a changing Arctic, the Hoover Institution brought together military, diplomatic, and scientific experts to engage in a series of discussions to address the strategic and security implications of increased activity in the Arctic. This series of discussions and workshops with scholars and experts identified ways in which to shape a safe, secure, and prosperous Arctic.

News
Meeting of the Arctic Security Initiative.

Arctic Solutions

Friday, November 16, 2012

To identify solutions for dealing with the changing Arctic, the Hoover Institution and the Brookings Institution have brought together military, diplomatic, and scientific experts to engage in a series of discussions to address the strategic and security implications of increased activity in the Arctic. The series of discussions will identify opportunities for shaping a safe, secure, and prosperous Arctic.

News

The changing global climate and the diminishing Arctic ice cap have made the Arctic more accessible now and in the foreseeable future.

When combined with economic and political developments, the changing Arctic is the most significant physical global event since the end of the last Ice Age. An unresolved strategic territory, the increased activity suggests that the region could become the subject of intensive negotiations and possible friction and confrontation relating to resources, ocean access, and sovereignty. In light of those changes and challenges, the Hoover Institution Arctic Security Initiative has been put in place to address the strategic and security implications of increased activity and to identify opportunities for shaping a safe, secure, and prosperous Arctic.