K-12 Education Task Force

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Jeb Bush Visits Washington To Talk About Education And Economic Opportunity

quoting Chester E. Finn Jr.via The State
Thursday, November 20, 2014

WASHINGTON — Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush in a speech on Thursday argued that it’s getting harder to make a living and rise above poverty in America, and that a fundamental reason is that too many students don’t have access to a good education.

Blogs

A Five-Point Plan To Resuscitate Catholic Schools

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, November 19, 2014

On November 11th, the Fordham Institute’s Chester E. Finn, Jr. addressed a private meeting of reform-minded Catholic education leaders and philanthropists. What follows is adapted from his remarks on that occasion.

Blogs

Do Teachers Support the Vergara Decision?

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Tuesday, November 18, 2014

In June, a California court ruled, in Vergara v. State of California, that the state’s tenure and seniority laws are unconstitutional. Minority students have filed a similar case in New York, with more to come elsewhere.

Featured Commentary

It May Be Harder To Become A Transformational Leader Than To Get Into Harvard

by John E. Chubbvia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Friday, November 14, 2014

Traditional principal preparation programs are notoriously non-selective. The new breed of program takes selectivity to the opposite extreme. Some have ratios of acceptances to inquiries or applications that rival competitive colleges—below 10 percent.

Other Media

Closing The Racial Achievement Gap Could Expand America's Economy By Trillions

quoting Eric Hanushekvia Huffington Post
Wednesday, November 12, 2014

The gap in educational achievement between white students and students of color could be costing the nation trillions of dollars, according to a new report.

Other Media

Getting More Poor Kids into College Won’t Fix Income Inequality

quoting Caroline M. Hoxbyvia Washington Post
Thursday, October 23, 2014

If you want to address income inequality, fix higher education. That seems to be the current thinking in Washington, where President Obama has urged college administrators to better serve low-income students.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured Commentary

The State of Education Reform

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Defining Ideas
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Though amazing progress has been over the past three decades, we need to do more. 

Other Media

Teaching Reform

mentioning Terry M. Moevia National Review Online
Friday, October 10, 2014

Those who fear that the big problem with America’s schools is the teachers who work in them would be heartened by spending a little time at an Educators 4 Excellence (E4E) conclave. Sydney Morris and Evan Stone launched Educators 4 Excellence in 2010 to push unions and schools to get serious about recognizing excellence and addressing mediocrity.

Featured Commentary

Time for a Reboot

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via National Review Online
Monday, October 6, 2014

Americans are ambivalent about testing, standards, and accountability in their children’s schools. This is clear from survey results that swing wildly depending on how, exactly, the question is phrased — and on whether the practice in question might inconvenience one’s own kid, as apart from “fixing those awful schools across town.”

Other Media

The University of Chicago Tries to Catch Up on Economic Diversity

mentioning Caroline M. Hoxbyvia New York Times
Wednesday, October 1, 2014

The University of Chicago announced a significant new program Wednesday to recruit more low-income students and to help them while on campus. The university said it would replace loans for needy students with grants and eliminate the application fee for lower-income students, among other measures.

Pages

Global Education

Peterson discusses US education in global perspective

Thursday, May 15, 2014

On Tuesday, May 13, Hoover senior fellow Paul Peterson discussed his study, conducted with fellow researchers Eric Hanushek (also a Hoover senior fellow) and Ludger Woessmann, which compares US children to other students in developed countries. The event, held at Harvard University, was recorded live and can be watched here. The study culminated in a book entitled Endangering Prosperity: A Global View of the American School. The Hoover sponsored publication EducationNext also ran several articles using the data from the study, one of which can be found here.

News
What Lies Ahead for America's Children and Their Schools

What Lies Ahead for America’s Children and Their Schools Examines Prospects for Education Reform in the United States

Tuesday, March 4, 2014
Stanford

The Hoover Institution Press released What Lies Ahead for America’s Children and Their Schools,  an assessment by the Hoover Institution’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education.  This profound work examines both the potential gains and the pitfalls that lie ahead for primary- and secondary-school education in the United States. 

Press Releases
Hoover's Koret Task Force on K-12 Education timeline, 1998-2014.

Koret Task Force on K-12 Education Reaches Milestone

Friday, February 21, 2014

The year 2014 marks the sixteenth year of work by Hoover’s Koret Task Force on K-12 Education. The eleven-member task force first met in 1999 and established as its mission to present pertinent facts about K–12 education, contribute to the debate with constructive commentary, and generate new ideas for education reform.

News
Sal Khan speaks at the Hoover Institution

Founder of Khan Academy Speaks at Hoover Institution

Monday, February 3, 2014

It began with concern over his faraway cousin’s problems with middle school math. Today, the initiative that Sal Khan started in August 2004 to help his cousin has grown into the Khan Academy, which reaches ten million users a month in nearly every country in the world.

Khan, the founder and executive director of the Khan Academy, gave the keynote address at the Hoover Institution’s symposium on Blended Learning in K–12 Education on January 16, 2014. Blended learning is the integration of classroom teaching with online lectures, exercises, and tutorials (such as those offered by the Khan Academy) that can viewed either at home or in the classroom at the student’s own pace.

News
Hoover senior fellow Caroline Hoxby

Hoxby named recipient of Smithsonian’s American Ingenuity Award

Monday, November 25, 2013

Hoover senior fellow Caroline M. Hoxby has been named one of the nine recipients of the Smithsonian’s annual American Ingenuity Awards for her research in encouraging low-income students to apply to and attend elite universities. Read the article summarizing her work or see the other award winners.

News
Hoover senior fellow Caroline M. Hoxby.

Hoxby featured on NBC News’s Master Class

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

On October 10, 2013, Caroline Hoxby was featured on NBC News's Master Class in a lecture entitled “Opportunity, Meritocracy, and Access to Higher Education.”

News
Endangering Prosperity: A Global View of the American School

In a new video and book, Hoover senior fellows Hanushek and Peterson explain how American schools are failing American citizens

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Dashton is enthusiastic about the number thirty-two. Find out why.

News
Walkway heading towards the School of Education and Hoover senior fellow and mem

Hoxby on expanding opportunities for low-income students

Monday, August 19, 2013

Caroline Hoxby, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, has dedicated years of research to finding out why low-income students aren’t applying to colleges that are their academic match. A recent study shows that awareness is the key. Students who received materials from Hoxby’s Expanding College Opportunities Project informing them about the available financial support and the likelihood of attaining a higher-paying job if they attended a selective college were 46 percent more likely to go to a top school than equally strong students who did not receive one.

News
Walkway heading towards the School of Education and Hoover senior fellow and mem

Hoxby’s Expanding College Opportunities project increases college prospects for high-achieving, low-income students

Monday, April 1, 2013

On Monday, April 1, 2013, Hoover fellow Caroline Hoxby and the University of Virginia’s Sarah Turner released their findings from the Expanding College Opportunities (ECO) project. ECO is a low-cost project aimed at addressing information gaps that prevent high-achieving, low-income students from applying to the nation’s best colleges.

News
Walkway heading towards the School of Education and Hoover senior fellow and mem

Hoxby study on low-income students featured in New York Times

Monday, March 18, 2013

According to a study released by Hoover fellow and Stanford professor of economics Caroline M. Hoxby and Harvard’s Christopher Avery, high-achieving, low-income students typically do not apply to the nation’s best colleges. In the study, featured in a March 16, 2013, New York Times story by David Leonhardt, Hoxby and Avery analyzed every high school student who took the SAT in a recent year.

News

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The K–12 Education Task Force focuses on education policy as it relates to government provision and oversight versus private solutions (both within and outside the public school system) that stress choice, accountability, and transparency; that include systematic reform options such as vouchers, charter schools, and testing; and that weigh equity concerns against outcome objectives.

Its collaborative efforts spawned a quarterly journal titled Education Next, one of the premier publications on public education research policy in the nation.

Chester E. Finn, Jr. serves as chair of the Task Force on K–12 education.