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Comparing PDK and Education Next Polls

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Thursday, August 21, 2014

Just released this week are two major education polls, one by Education Next (EdNext), a journal of opinion and research, and the other by Phi Delta Kappan (PDK), a journal that serves the alumnae of schools of education. Both survey nationally representative samples of the U. S. adult population. EdNext polls about 5,000 respondents, including a nationally representative sample of teachers, by means of an online survey administered by Knowledge Networks. PDK poses questions to about 1,000 respondents in a poll administered by Gallup.

Blogs

Comparing PDK and Education Next Polls

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Just released this week are two major education polls, one by Education Next (Ednext), a journal of opinion and research, and the other by Phi Delta Kappan (PDK), a journal that serves the alumnae of schools of education. Both survey nationally representative samples of the U. S. adult population. Ednext polls about 5,000 respondents, including a nationally representative sample of teachers, by means of an online survey administered by Knowledge Networks. PDK poses questions to about 1,000 respondents in a poll administered by Gallup.

Other Media

A Bad Week For Common Core

quoting Paul E. Petersonvia Politico
Wednesday, August 20, 2014

This has not been a great week for the Common Core. Two new national polls, released Wednesday and Tuesday, found the public souring on the academic standards, which are meant to elevate math, reading and writing instruction across the nation. One of the polls, conducted by the journal Education Next, also found a steep plunge in support for the standards among public school teachers.

Other Media

Poll: Common Core Support Among Teachers Plummets, With Fewer Than Half Supporting It

quoting Paul E. Petersonvia The Washington Post
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Anybody watching the escalating battle across the country over the Common Core State Standards and aligned standardized testing will hardly be surprised by a new national poll which reveals a significant loss of support over the last year — especially among teachers, whose approval rating dropped from 76 percent  in 2013 to only  46 percent in 2014. Overall support for the Core dropped from 65 percent last year to 53 percent in 2014, with most of the defection among Republicans.

Other Media

Conservative Study Finds Falling Support for 'Common Core'

featuring Paul E. Petersonvia The Hill
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Public support for Common Core, the Obama administration’s program for setting education standards, has dwindled over the last year, according to a new study from a conservative group. The survey from Education Next, a journal published by the conservative Hoover Institution, found that 53 percent of people still favor Common Core, but the program’s support has declined sharply from 65 percent in 2013.

Blogs

Political Polarization Needlessly Divides the Public on Common Core and NCLB

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Political polarization is making it increasingly difficult to sustain support for policy undertakings that a majority of the public supports. Narrow interest groups and small minorities are twisting public opinion through slogans and rhetoric to which sensation-mongering elements in the media are giving excessive attention. Such is my conclusion after reviewing eight years of Education Next (Ednext) polling on No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Featured Commentary

The Public Turns Against Teacher Tenure

by Paul E. Petersonvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

It's back-to-school season, but teacher tenure has been a hot topic since summer began. In June a California court ruled that the state's tenure and seniority laws are unconstitutional in Vergara v. State of California. Minority students have filed a similar case in New York, with more to come elsewhere.

Featured Commentary

Leo Strauss' Political Philosophy: Reviled But Redeemed

by Peter Berkowitzvia Real Clear Politics
Saturday, August 16, 2014

“Always assume that there is one silent student in your class who is by far superior to you in head and in heart.” This is the counsel Leo Strauss, among the most consequential teachers and scholars of political philosophy in the 20th century, offered an advanced graduate student who had asked for a general rule about teaching.

Education and testing
Other Media

New York State Students Post Slight Gains on Tests

quoting Michael J. Petrillivia The New York Times
Friday, August 15, 2014

The percentage of New York State elementary- and middle-school students passing statewide math exams inched up in 2014 while reading scores remained flat, a mixed performance in the second year of a new, more difficult testing program, according to results released on Thursday.

Blogs

The Hidden Half: School Employees Who Don’t Teach

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Education Next
Friday, August 15, 2014

Why do American public schools spend more of their operating budgets on non-teachers than almost every other country in the world, including nations that are as prosperous and humane as ours? We can’t be certain.

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K-12 Education Task Force

 
The K–12 Education Task Force focuses on education policy as it relates to government provision and oversight versus private solutions (both within and outside the public school system) that stress choice, accountability, and transparency.

CREDO at Stanford University