Wednesday, September 29, 2010

2010 No. 4

Why It’s Safer to Drill in the Backyard

by Terry Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Crying “NIMBY” guarantees that the worst oil spills happen in the
worst place.

The Other Toxic Gunk

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The oil cleanup was just a start. The whole liability, environmental, and
property-rights mess needs to be cleaned up, too.

Lessons from the Great Deviation

by John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

How the Great Deviation killed the Great Moderation and gave birth
to the Great Recession.

Those Infamous Speculators

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Why they’re not always the bad guys.

We Are Not All Keynesians Now

by Russell Robertsvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

To Hayek, economic freedom was the bulwark of political freedom.
His insights hold up.

Junk the Corporate Tax

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

There’s no better way to end tax distortions, boost growth and
competitiveness, and ultimately raise wages.

Healthy Skepticism

by David Brady, Daniel P. Kessler, Douglas Riversvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

A portent for November: very few of the Americans who disliked
comprehensive health care reform a few months ago like it any better
now.

No More “Party of No”

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

How conservatives can reclaim their heritage of prudent reform.

“Why Wouldn’t People Like ’Em?”

by Tunku Varadarajanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Two successful Indo-American politicians seem to have risen by
defying identity politics, not pandering to them.

Frontier Wisdom

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Ronald Reagan believed in remaining open to immigration. He also
believed in securing our borders.

The Nightmare Comes True

by Stewart Bakervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Homemade, custom-built bioweapons are no longer science
fiction. Tomorrow’s terrorists will have them. From a new book by
Stewart Baker.

The Military and the Academy

by Lieutenant Colonel Dave Almandvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Civilian experts need to play their part in preparing for the day when
a war ends and peace begins.

Cash as an Instrument of War

by Lieutenant Colonel Sam Grablevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Money can buy intelligence, security, even loyalty. Commanders
should use it.

The Language of Diplomacy

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Beijing is paying for Chinese-language schools all around the world,
including scores in the United States. Should we be concerned?

Progressively Worse

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The progressive tradition, with its expanding taxes and shrinking
individual rights, produces anything but genuine progress.

The Arab Democracy Deficit

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Between autocracy and the “oil curse,” Arab nations still see no need
to serve their citizens. This may yet change.

Grand Strategies

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The road to statecraft runs through literature.

Islam’s Nowhere Men

by Fouad Ajamivia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Jihadists are conflicted citizens of the very world they wish to
destroy.

A Torn Country

by Zeyno Baranvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

History and politics are disturbing Turkey’s careful balance between
West and East, secular and Islamic. From a new book by Zeyno Baran.

Freedom or Terror

by Russell A. Bermanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Will Europe defend its hard-earned freedoms against radical Islam?
Will it even try? From a new book by Russell A. Berman.

Lifting the “Resource Curse”

by Stephen Haber, Victor Menaldovia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Mineral wealth can build a nation or subvert it. Afghanistan might
become a success story yet.

Velvet Revolution, Interrupted

by Fouad Ajamivia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The Iranian petrocracy has kept its grip on power, and President
Obama bears much of the responsibility.

Neither Crushed nor Co-opted

by Abbas Milanivia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The streets of Tehran may be quiet, but reformers continue to struggle
for a pluralist, democratic future.

Good Manners and Anti-Semitism

by Shelby Steelevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

As troubles in the Middle East proliferate, many in the West have
reverted to a very old, very bad habit: scapegoating the Jews.

The Simplest Peace Plan: Victory

by Daniel Pipesvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Defeating its enemies and securing its right to exist are Israel’s only
road map to peace.

A Shock to the Eurozone

by Michael Spencevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

When they joined the common currency, the nations of Europe all
promised to behave themselves, practicing fiscal discipline. Bankers
even believed them.

“Hubris” Is Greek

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The Greece debacle is not just financial. It also jeopardizes the EU’s
grandest plans for itself.

An Economist’s Economist

by Robert E. Hall, Douglas Clementvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Hoover fellow Robert E. Hall talks about job creation, flat taxes, and
the art (and science) of declaring a recession.

Into the Valley of Death

by Peter M. Robinson, Sebastian Jungervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Best-selling author Sebastian Junger goes to War. An interview with
Peter Robinson.

Why I Love the WNBA

by Condoleezza Ricevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Great female athletes deserve their chance to shine even after
college.

America at the Bat

by Diana Schaubvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, September 28, 2010

On meritocracy and the national pastime.

Solving the Afghanistan Puzzle

by Katya Drozdovavia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

A new research project follows the paper trail of Soviet involvement in
Afghanistan—and suggests a great deal about our own involvement
there today.

On the Cover

via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

“With a full heart, I bear in mind the beautiful exhibition which alas I was to see no more, and I tend to you all the friendship.” So lamented the chief German representative to the 1914 Baltic Exposition in a telegram he sent to the fair’s closing ceremonies.