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Explore our past and future exhibits, the Hoover Tower, and the Stanford campus
Other Media

Eva Perón, Icon And Spirit, Is Reimagined On The Stanford Stage

mentioning Hoover Institutionvia Stanford University
Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Stanford junior Sammi Cannold is a great admirer of fem-icon Eva Perón, Argentina's first lady from 1946 until her death in 1952. It all started with Evita. After seeing the 2012 Broadway revival in New York several times during her senior year of high school (it was at the top of her gift wish list throughout the year), she spent time in the New York Public Library Archives watching the original production, regional productions and the movie version. Three years later Cannold made a pilgrimage to Perón's hometown of Junín, Argentina, and her gravesite in Buenos Aires, and started collecting all things Eva.

Law and Justice
Other Media

For Loretta Lynch, A Stunning Debut On The World Stage

quoting Tunku Varadarajanvia Politico
Wednesday, May 27, 2015

For almost six months, Loretta Lynch was known mostly as the woman who couldn’t get an up-or-down vote on her nomination as attorney general. But after only a month in office she could hardly have crafted a more attention-grabbing debut than the dramatic announcement she made Wednesday of an American-led takedown of corruption in FIFA, the governing body of international soccer. Lynch, wrote the German newspaper Bild, was “shocking FIFA like an earthquake.”

Other Media

Poland Outperforms UK In Education And Health, Report Finds

quoting Michael Spencevia The Guardian
Thursday, May 28, 2015

In his foreword to the report, Nobel prize-winning economist A. Michael Spence said: “To pursue wellbeing effectively, countries need to achieve economic growth that is both socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable. The importance of a decisive, broad-based effort in this regard cannot be overemphasised. It is very good and encouraging to see the kind of contribution that this report, developed by strategy experts focused on wellbeing, makes to that effort.”

Education and testing
Blogs

Closing The Expectations Gap 2014

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Achieve has spent a decade relentlessly tracking and reporting on states’ progress in adopting “college- and career-ready” (CCR) policies and practices across multiple fronts. Sometimes we’ve found their reports too rosy, or at least too credulous, with a tendency to credit state assertions that they’re doing something rather than looking under the surface to see whether it’s really happening.

Featured Commentary

Seven Take-Aways From The FIFA Arrests

by Tunku Varadarajanvia Politico
Wednesday, May 27, 2015

There can’t be a single soccer fan anywhere in the world who didn’t have the sports-lover’s equivalent of a righteous orgasm on learning of the arrest at dawn — by the Swiss police — of seven FIFA senior officials.  As of this writing, these men were being readied for extradition to the United States, where they will be prosecuted for “racketeering” — a fabulous word that is America’s greatest bequest to the lexicon of criminal justice. Here are seven short take-aways from the episode, some reflective of hard fact, others, perhaps, of wishful thinking.

Featured Commentary

Knocking On War's Door

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Wednesday, May 27, 2015

For a time, reset, concessions and appeasement work to delay wars. But finally, nations wake up, grasp their blunders, rearm and face down enemies. That gets dangerous. The shocked aggressors cannot quite believe that their targets are suddenly serious and willing to punch back. Usually, the bullies foolishly press aggression, and war breaks out. It was insane of Nazi Germany and its Axis partners to even imagine that they could defeat the Allied trio of Imperial Britain, the Soviet Union and the United States. But why not try?

Other Media

Iran: Pirate Of The Persian Gulf

quoting Kori Schakevia SF Gate
Thursday, May 28, 2015

“I personally think the politics are so opaque in Iran that I wouldn’t hazard a guess as to who’s behind it,” opined Hoover Institution foreign policy fellow Kori Schake. “This could just be the regular functioning of their government.” In a way, it doesn’t matter why. Rezaian’s trial tells Americans everything they need to know: Unless the government abandons this cruel charade, Iran cannot be trusted. The people of Iran may be gracious and open, but their government is ruthless and terrifying.

Other Media

Russia ‘Reset’ Architect To Next President: Don’t Try That Again

featuring Michael McFaulvia Yahoo News
Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Former U.S. ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul, a key architect of President Barack Obama’s attempt to “reset” relations with Moscow, has some advice for the next president: Don’t try that again. “Don’t say, ‘We need another reset with Russia.’ And I’m the guy that said that to the president the last time around in the Oval Office,” McFaul told Yahoo News, describing his support for the effort to reboot relations with Russia in 2009.

Blogs

Senate Timing, Temperament And 2016 Odds

by Bill Whalenvia A Day At The Races
Wednesday, May 27, 2015

I got to sit in on a roundtable talk with a Republican senator earlier today, during which said lawmaker expressed hope of getting tax reform moving in Congress. My thought: will timing and temperament make this possible? As for the former (timing), we’re already midway through 2015. Next year is a re-election year for one-third of the U.S. Senate and the entire House. Does that make for more productivity or less — especially something as prolonged as tax reform?

Federal Reserve
Blogs

Small Shoes And Headroom

by John H. Cochrane via Grumpy Economist
Thursday, May 28, 2015

I talked with Kathleen Hays and Michael McKee on Bloomberg Radio last week, and they asked (twice!) a question that comes up often in thinking about Fed policy: shouldn't the Fed raise rates now, so it has some "headroom" to lower them again if another recession should strike? I could only answer with my standard joke: That's like the theory that you should wear shoes two sizes too small because it feels so good to take them off at the end of the day.

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