James Goodby

Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow
Biography: 

James E. Goodby has served in the US Foreign Service, achieving the rank of Career Minister, and was appointed to five ambassadorial-rank positions by Presidents Carter, Reagan, and Clinton, including ambassador to Finland. He taught at Georgetown, Syracuse, and Carnegie Mellon Universities and is Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus at Carnegie Mellon. Ambassador Goodby has worked with former Secretary of State George Shultz at Hoover since 2007. He is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

He was a Distinguished Service Professor at Carnegie Mellon University from 1989 to 1999 and is now a professor emeritus. Selected for the US Foreign Service through competitive examinations in 1952, Goodby rose to the rank of career minister in the Senior Foreign Service and was given five presidential appointments to ambassadorial rank, including ambassador to Finland (1980–81). During his Foreign Service career he was involved as a negotiator or as a policy adviser in the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the negotiation of the limited nuclear test ban treaty, START, the Conference on Disarmament in Europe, and cooperative threat reduction (the Nunn-Lugar program).

Goodby is the author and editor of several books. His most recent publication is Deterrence: Its Past and Future—Papers Presented at Hoover Institution, November 2010 (Hoover Institution Press, 2011) edited with George P. Shultz and Sidney D. Drell. He also wrote At the Borderline of Armageddon: How American Presidents Managed the Atom Bomb (Rowman & Littlefield, 2006). With Sidney Drell he wrote The Gravest Danger: Nuclear Weapons (Hoover Institution Press, 2003) and the essay A World without Nuclear Weapons: End-State Issues (Hoover Institution Press, 2009). Goodby coedited Reykjavik Revisited: Steps toward a World Free of Nuclear Weapons (Hoover Institution Press, 2008) and contributed essays to Reykjavik Revisited and Implications of the Reykjavik Summit on Its Twentieth Anniversary (Hoover Institution Press, 2007).

Goodby’s awards include the Presidential Distinguished Service Award, the State Department’s Superior and Distinguished Honor Awards, and the Commander’s Cross of the Order of Merit of Germany. He was named a Distinguished Fellow of the US Institute of Peace in 1992. He was the recipient of the inaugural Heinz Award in Public Policy in 1995. In 1996, he was awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree by the Stetson University College of Law.

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Imagining ‘A World Without Nuclear Weapons’

by George P. Shultz, James Goodby, Sidney D. Drell, Raymond Jeanlozvia The New York Times
Friday, April 15, 2016

“From Hiroshima to a Nuke-Free World” (editorial, April 13) underscored the need for “bolder action” than the Obama administration has been able to take in recent years to move toward its long-term goal of a world without nuclear weapons, a vision that we share.

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A Nonproliferation Regime For The 21st Century

by James Goodby, Steven Pifervia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, July 7, 2015
We need new strategies to contain the spread of nuclear weapons.  
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A World Without Nuclear Weapons

by James Goodby, Steven Pifervia Defining Ideas
Wednesday, April 29, 2015

This is how we get there. 

Nuclear bomb's tell-tale mushroom cloud
Analysis and Commentary

Nuclear Non-Proliferation: We Must Keep Working For A World Without Nuclear Weapons (Yes, It's Possible)

by James Goodby, Steven Pifervia Fox News
Friday, April 24, 2015

At the Nonproliferation Treaty Review Conference later this month at the United Nations, the five nuclear weapon states recognized by the Treaty will come in for critical scrutiny from an international community that regards current approaches to nuclear arms as inadequate.

The War that Must Never Be Fought

by James Goodbyvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 20, 2015

To eliminate nuclear weapons, we must first eliminate outmoded thinking

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The Nuclear Dilemma

by James Goodbyvia Defining Ideas
Wednesday, March 18, 2015

The world's nuclear stockpiles are shrinking. But that doesn't mean the world is a safer place. 

Challenging the Assumptions of Classical Nuclear Deterrence Theory: The War That Must Never Be Fought

by James Goodby, Benoît Pelopidas, Steven Pifervia Analysis
Thursday, March 12, 2015

The first three chapters of this book ask whether the conventional wisdom regarding deterrence based on the threat of a nuclear attack remains valid in present geopolitical circumstances, especially from an American point of view.  The authors build a case for challenging the status quo.

The Global Commons - Building a New Cooperative Security Regime: The War That Must Never Be Fought

by James Goodby, Steven Pifervia Analysis
Thursday, March 12, 2015

The cooperative nuclear control regime that was built up over decades has shown serious signs of decay.

The War That Must Never Be Fought

via Hoover Press
Thursday, March 12, 2015

The War That Must Never Be Fought borrows its title from President Ronald Reagan's State of the Union message of 1984 in which he declared "a nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought.”  He was prepared to challenge theories about nuclear deterrence, which were even then outdated. The essays in this book reveal how much more complex the issue that Reagan raised has become.

Nuclear bomb's tell-tale mushroom cloud
Analysis and Commentary

The End of a Nuclear Era

by James Goodbyvia New York Times
Wednesday, August 14, 2013

U.S. arms control policies have been overly preoccupied with negotiating with Russia.

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