Second International Workshop on Japanese Diaspora

The Hoover Institution Library & Archives at Stanford University and the Japanese Association for Migration Studies co-host the Second International Workshop on Japanese Diaspora. In-person presentations will be held onsite (unless otherwise noted) and will be made available via webinar for registered attendees. The webinar begins at 10:15 am. 

The workshop, supported by the endowed Japanese Diaspora Initiative at Hoover, encourages rising young scholars to present their new research on Japanese global migration. An international roster of junior scholars, post-docs, and graduate students in modern Japanese history and Japanese American studies will come to the Hoover Institution Library & Archives, which holds a vast collection of Japanese and Japanese American archival materials, to discuss the Japanese diaspora from a global perspective. This workshop allows scholars to consider the history of Japanese migrant workers and immigrants as complex non-binominal interactive processes among the homeland and multiple host countries. 

This event also includes a lecture on Thursday, November 3rd, which will be open to the public. Attendees must be registered to participate online or in-person (seats are limited).  Registration to the public lecture is separate from the full-day workshop. 

Event Details:

Second International Workshop on Japanese Diaspora

Date/Time: November 4, 2022, 8:15 am – 7:30 pm (Pacific Time)
Webinar begins at 10:15 am and ends at 6:00 pm (Pacific Time)

Venue: Hoover Institution Library & Archives, Stanford University
434 Galvez Mall
Stanford, CA 94305-6003 
(nearby airports are San Jose and San Francisco)

Program, Abstracts, Bios, and Presentation Recordings

Download the full-day workshop schedule.

Download the abstracts and bios of the presenters and chairs.

Click on the content title in the table below to view recordings of the presentations and discussions on YouTube.

Friday, November 4
Time Content Presenters Chair

8:15 – 8:45 AM

Breakfast

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9:00 – 10:00 AM

Tour of the Hoover Institution Library & Archives

Kaoru (Kay) Ueda, Stanford University

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10:15 – 11:45 AM

Welcome and Introductions

Kaoru (Kay) Ueda, Stanford University; Eiichiro Azuma, University of Pennsylvania

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Session 1: Geopolitics, Nationalism, and Identity

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Session Chair, Jun Uchida, Stanford University    

 

Presentation 1: The Saburō Mashiko Murder Case: The Post-1924 Migration of Japanese Women and Crimes in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Yu Tokunaga, Kyoto University

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Presentation 2: Racial Geopolitics in the Caribbean: Locating the Japanese Migrants in the Dominican Pigmentocracy

Midori Komatsu Hidaka, Doshisha University 

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Presentation 3: Between Subjection and Citizenship: 1930’s Japanese Language Schools and Nikkei citizenry in Hawaii

Rashaad Eshack, University of Cambridge

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Q&A and Discussion

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12:00 PM

Lunch

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12:30 - 1:00 PM

Session 1: Continued

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Presentation 4: Imperial Vocabulary: Public Political Discourse of the Japanese Diaspora, 1895-1935 

Andrew Patrick Nelson, Stanford University

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1:15 - 2:45 PM

Session 2: World War II and its Consequences

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Session Chair, Yuma Totani, University of Hawai'i

 

Presentation 5: From American Orientals to “We, the East Asian Race(s)”?: Japanese Americans, Chinese, and China, 1931-1942

Shinya Yoshida, University of Minnesota

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Presentation 6: Two Trajectories of Diasporic Engagement: A Comparative Study of Intra-group Conflicts among Japanese Migrants in Brazil in the Aftermath of WWII

(View appendices)

Hiroyuki Shibata, Independent Researcher

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Presentation 7: How the War Ended: Japanese Returnees in Hawaiʻi in 1945

Saki Miyazaki, Hitotsubashi University

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Q&A and Discussion

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3:00 – 4:30 PM Session 3: Economy and Global Commodity (Hybrid)  --

Session Chair, Yoko Tsukuda, Seijo University

 

 

Presentation 8: Planting Knowledge: Modernizing Agriculture in Japanese Brazil

Andre Kobayashi Deckrow, University of Minnesota

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Presentation 9: The Japanese Diaspora as transnational history: migration, development, and nation-building in the Brazilian Amazon

(View sources and references)

Facundo Julian Garasino, JICA Ogata Sadako Research Institute for Peace and Development

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Presentation 10: Documenting Loss through the Enemy’s Books 

Naoko Kato, St. Mark’s College

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Q&A and Discussion

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4:45 – 6:00 PM

Discussion and Concluding Remarks (Hybrid)

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Workshop Chair, Eiichiro Azuma, University of Pennsylvania

6:15 – 7:30 PM

Dinner

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