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Eriks Jekabsons’ Magnum Opus On American Assistance To Latvia Released In Riga

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Professor Eriks Jekabsons of the University of Latvia, a historian who has worked at the Hoover Institution several times during the past decade, has written an 800-page monograph on relations between Latvia and the United States, with special emphasis on the American aid to that country during 1918−22. The publication is based mostly on documentation found in the Hoover Archives and is richly illustrated with photographs from Hoover holdings.

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Deadline Extended For The Summer Workshop On Authoritarianism And Democratic Breakdown

Friday, April 6, 2018

The Hoover Institution Library & Archives at Stanford University is pleased to announce that the deadline for applications for the Summer 2018 Workshop on Authoritarianism and Democratic Breakdown has been extended to April 19, 2018.

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We Shot the War: Overseas Weekly in Vietnam

New Exhibition: We Shot the War: Overseas Weekly in Vietnam

Friday, April 6, 2018

The Vietnam War occurred in a period of dramatic political, social, and cultural upheaval.

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Mary Elisabeth Cox
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Visiting Fellow Dr Mary Elisabeth Cox Applies New Research Methods to the Study of War Crimes

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Dr Mary Elisabeth Cox, a Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution and a Junior Research Fellow at Brasenose College at the University of Oxford, has published a new study as part of a multidisciplinary group focused on war crimes studies based at the University of Oxford.

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Hoover Archives Materials Added To Library of Congress National Recording Registry

Monday, March 19, 2018

Every year, the Library of Congress adds twenty-five sound recordings to its National Recording Registry of historical documents that showcase “the range and diversity of American recorded sound heritage.” The latest additions were announced on March 21st and include a series of radio broadcasts held by the Hoover Archives.

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Silas Palmer Fellow Nnamdi Igbokwe
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Silas Palmer Fellow Nnamdi Igbokwe Explores Nigeria's "Capitalist Militician"

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Since independence in 1960, the Nigerian government is estimated to have lost over 400 billion dollars to corruption, and has consistently ranked as one of the most corrupt countries in the world. This begs the question: what is so distinctive about Nigeria’s corruption?

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Derg Former Executive Member And EPLF Member Captain Michael G. Haile Visits Hoover Archives

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

On Friday, March 9, Hoover Archives hosted a visit by Captain Michael G. Haile, one of the former executive committee members of the military junta known as the Derg which ruled Ethiopia from 1974 to 1987. The Derg, also known as the Coordinating Committee of the Armed Forces, Police and Territorial Army, overthrew Haile Selassie, the former Emperor of Ethiopia.

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Feng-en Sung, James Wei and an official, West Berlin City Government meeting in West Berlin, ca. 1968
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The Cold War’s Unlikely Duo: The Secret Rendezvous Between Taiwan And The Soviet Union

Thursday, March 8, 2018

By the early 1960s, the Sino-Soviet alliance began to show signs of strain. Polemical battles were under way, and shortly these battles were beginning to split the international Communist movement. As the rift intensified during the Cultural Revolution (1966–76), Mao Zedong elevated the Soviet Union to the rank of social imperialists, while the Red Guards harassed the Soviet diplomatic staff, and border incidents reached a new height.

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Silas Palmer Fellows Ewa Syska PhD and Anna Idzikowska-Czubaj PhD,
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Polish Silas Palmer Fellows Study The Rakowski Diaries

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Ewa Syska and Anna Idzikowska-Czubaj, two PhDs from the Institute of History of the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, have just completed their research on one of Hoover Archives’ premier East European collections, the Mieczysław F. Rakowski Papers, and more specifically on Rakowski’s voluminous “political diaries,” detailing nearly four decades (1958−96) of his career in Communist Poland and life in the first years after its demise in 1989.

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Silas Palmer Fellow Traces The Iranian Diaspora In The United States

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

The first wave of Iranian migration to the United States happened decades before the 1979 Revolution; many came to the U.S. as student sojourners looking to receive an American education. Many also used the opportunity to protest and distribute information about the Shah’s political policies, social conditions in Iran, and the lived realities of American imperialism. It is from this engagement that expressions of resistance among Iranians in the United States expanded to encompass a diverse array of political leanings.

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