Hoover Library and Archives Present New Exhibit: “A Tear in the Iron Curtain: The Hungarian Uprising of 1956”

Monday, September 11, 2006
STANFORD
 

Revolution, it was said, was in the air. On October 23, 1956, thousands of Hungarians began peacefully demonstrating against the communist government that had dominated the nation since 1949. During the 12 days that followed the protests escalated with millions of Hungarians becoming involved. Initially, when the Soviet tanks withdrew, many Hungarians believed they were victorious. However, after Prime Minister Imre Nagy declared his intentions to hold free elections and withdraw from the Warsaw Pact, the Soviets returned in force and crushed the revolution.

The Hoover Library and Archives exhibit, “A Tear in the Iron Curtain: The Hungarian Uprising of 1956,” opening September 19, commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Hungarian Uprising.

 
“A Tear in the Iron Curtain” features photographs taken by the eminent Austrian photographer Erich Lessing who covered the Hungarian Uprising from its beginning to its end. Lessing, who covered political events in post-World War II Europe for the Associated Press and Magnum Photos, had his work published in LIFE, Paris Match, Picture Post, and Quick Magazine. Other materials included in the exhibit are broadcasts by Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (in Hungarian with English transcripts) and flyers and leaflets that outline the Hungarian Freedom Fighter demands. The exhibit will also include screenings of a documentary film by Sally Gati titled Starting Over in America: The Story of the Hungarian 56ers that focuses on 15 Hungarians who came to the United States following the revolution.
 

Although the events of 1956 continue to be studied and debated, the Hungarian Uprising is viewed as the tear in the Iron Curtain that foreshadowed the end of the Soviet bloc. After the Iron Curtain came down in 1989 Hungary was able to embrace a democratic system, proclaiming itself the Republic of Hungary",1] ); //--> //]]>

“A Tear in the Iron Curtain” features photographs taken by the eminent Austrian photographer Erich Lessing who covered the Hungarian Uprising from its beginning to its end. Lessing, who covered political events in post-World War II Europe for the Associated Press and Magnum Photos, had his work published in LIFE, Paris Match, Picture Post, and Quick Magazine. Other materials included in the exhibit are broadcasts by Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (in Hungarian with English transcripts) and flyers and leaflets that outline the Hungarian Freedom Fighter demands. The exhibit will also include screenings of a documentary film by Sally Gati titled Starting Over in America: The Story of the Hungarian 56ers that focuses on 15 Hungarians who came to the United States following the revolution.

Although the events of 1956 continue to be studied and debated, the Hungarian Uprising is viewed as the tear in the Iron Curtain that foreshadowed the end of the Soviet bloc. After the Iron Curtain came down in 1989 Hungary was able to embrace a democratic system, proclaiming itself the Republic of Hungary

 
The exhibit will be open to the public from September 19 through December 15, 2006, in the Herbert Hoover Memorial Exhibit Pavilion, next to Hoover Tower, and is free of charge. Pavilion hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. For more information, go to www.hoover.org/hila/pavilionexhibit.htm or contact 650-723-3563.
 
Images from exhibit are available upon request.
 
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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT
LaNor Maune, Public Affairs Writer
Michele Horaney APR, Public Affairs Manager
Office of Public Affairs

Hoover Institution, Stanford University",1] ); //--> //]]> on October 23, 1989.

The exhibit will be open to the public from September 19 through December 15, 2006, in the Herbert Hoover Memorial Exhibit Pavilion, next to Hoover Tower, and is free of charge. Pavilion hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. For more information, go to www.hoover.org/hila/pavilionexhibit.htm or contact 650-723-3563.
 
Images from exhibit are available upon request.