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Monday, September 14, 2020

Issue 67

U.S. Troop Deployments in Germany
Background Essay
Background Essay

America—A European Power No More? Shifting Tectonics, Changing Interests, And The Shrinking Size Of U.S. Troops In Europe

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Friday, September 11, 2020

The Trump drawdown of U.S. troops in Europe is not the end of the alliance, but part of a familiar story. America’s military presence has been contested from Week 1—make that February 4–11, 1945. At Yalta, Franklin D. Roosevelt assured Joseph Stalin that the United States would soon depart from Europe. Its troops—three million at the peak—would all be gone in two years.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

Is It Wise To Pull Out And Redeploy 12,000 U.S. Troops From Germany?

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Friday, September 11, 2020

President Trump’s decision to return the U.S 2nd Cavalry Regiment currently stationed in Germany to American soil (6,500 troops), as well as to redeploy mostly Air Force units from Germany to Italy and command headquarters to Belgium and Poland (another 5,600), will have mostly modest positive military consequences and has already benefited America diplomatically. The military consequences are modest because U.S forces in Europe have long since ceased to be potential combatants. 

Featured Commentary

Return Of Forces From Germany?

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Friday, September 11, 2020

On September 11, 1944, a patrol led by Staff Sergeant Warner L. Holzinger of Troop B, 85th Reconnaissance Squadron, 5th Armored Division, crossed the Our River from Luxembourg into Germany. Those five soldiers were the vanguard of a mighty Allied force that would within eight months conquer the Third Reich, thereby ending World War II in Europe.

E.g., 10 / 22 / 2020
E.g., 10 / 22 / 2020
Monday, September 14, 2020

Issue 67

U.S. Troop Deployments in Germany

Background Essay

by Josef Joffe Friday, September 11, 2020
article

Featured Commentary

by Angelo M. Codevilla Friday, September 11, 2020
article
by Peter R. Mansoor Friday, September 11, 2020
article

Related Commentary

by Victor Davis Hanson Thursday, August 20, 2020
article
Wednesday, August 12, 2020

Issue 66

The Status of the EU

Background Essay

by Ralph Peters Wednesday, August 12, 2020
article

Featured Commentary

by Jakub Grygiel Wednesday, August 12, 2020
article
by Andrew Roberts Wednesday, August 12, 2020
article
Friday, May 29, 2020

Issue 65

U.S. Recognition of Taiwan

Background Essay

by Gordon G. Chang Friday, May 29, 2020
article

Featured Commentary

by Seth Cropsey Friday, May 29, 2020
article
by John Yoo, Robert J. Delahunty Friday, May 29, 2020
article
Thursday, April 23, 2020

Issue 64

China After the Pandemic

Background Essay

by Michael R. Auslin Thursday, April 23, 2020
article

Featured Commentary

by Gordon G. Chang Thursday, April 23, 2020
article
by Ralph Peters Thursday, April 23, 2020
article

Related Commentary

by H. R. McMaster Monday, April 20, 2020
article
by Niall Ferguson Monday, April 6, 2020
article
by Michael R. Auslin Tuesday, March 31, 2020
article
interview with Michael R. Auslin Friday, March 20, 2020
podcast
by Michael R. Auslin Wednesday, March 18, 2020
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Tuesday, March 17, 2020
article
by Michael R. Auslin Friday, February 7, 2020
article
by Michael R. Auslin Tuesday, April 7, 2020
article
by Michael R. Auslin Friday, March 27, 2020
article
interview with Elizabeth Economy Monday, April 20, 2020
video
by Elizabeth Economy Monday, February 10, 2020
article
by Jakub Grygiel Thursday, April 16, 2020
article
interview with Victor Davis Hanson Thursday, April 9, 2020
video
by CAPT Chris Sharman Tuesday, March 31, 2020
article
by John Yoo, Ivana Stradner Monday, April 6, 2020
article

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Related Commentary

Greek–Turkish Rivalry Is Again Near the Boiling Point

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Saturday, October 10, 2020

Add up all the contorted rivalries, histories, and overlapping alliances and loyalties, and the dispute may seem irrational.

Related Commentary

Victor Davis Hanson: Trump Is Greece’s Best Friend

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Ekathimerini
Friday, October 9, 2020

He talks frequently with the US president and he’s one of the few people who knows about the real views of Donald Trump on Greece.

Strategika

Strategika Issue 67: U.S. Troop Deployments In Germany

via Strategika
Thursday, September 17, 2020

Strategika Issue 67 is now available online. Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Featured Commentary

Return Of Forces From Germany?

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Friday, September 11, 2020

On September 11, 1944, a patrol led by Staff Sergeant Warner L. Holzinger of Troop B, 85th Reconnaissance Squadron, 5th Armored Division, crossed the Our River from Luxembourg into Germany. Those five soldiers were the vanguard of a mighty Allied force that would within eight months conquer the Third Reich, thereby ending World War II in Europe.

Featured Commentary

Is It Wise To Pull Out And Redeploy 12,000 U.S. Troops From Germany?

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Friday, September 11, 2020

President Trump’s decision to return the U.S 2nd Cavalry Regiment currently stationed in Germany to American soil (6,500 troops), as well as to redeploy mostly Air Force units from Germany to Italy and command headquarters to Belgium and Poland (another 5,600), will have mostly modest positive military consequences and has already benefited America diplomatically. The military consequences are modest because U.S forces in Europe have long since ceased to be potential combatants. 

Background Essay

America—A European Power No More? Shifting Tectonics, Changing Interests, And The Shrinking Size Of U.S. Troops In Europe

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Friday, September 11, 2020

The Trump drawdown of U.S. troops in Europe is not the end of the alliance, but part of a familiar story. America’s military presence has been contested from Week 1—make that February 4–11, 1945. At Yalta, Franklin D. Roosevelt assured Joseph Stalin that the United States would soon depart from Europe. Its troops—three million at the peak—would all be gone in two years.

Related Commentary

Cleopatra Sails Again

by Barry Strauss via Military History in the News
Thursday, August 27, 2020

September 2 marks 2050 years since the Battle of Actium (31 B.C.), the naval engagement that made Imperial Rome and shaped the future of western civilization. The anniversary reminds us that navies have had a massive impact on the history of the Mediterranean. That, in turn, throws a spotlight on the ominous rise in naval tensions in the region today.

Related Commentary

Goodbye — Sort Of — To Germany?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, August 20, 2020

Why should America anchor Germany's defense? It cuts deals with Russia, has never met its NATO commitment, and is the most anti-American nation in Europe.

Related Commentary

A Small Island And Perhaps A Big Conflict

by Barry Strauss via Military History in the News
Tuesday, August 18, 2020

What do Cleopatra, the man who blew up the Parthenon, Greek Prime Minister Mitsotakis, and Turkey’s President Erdoğan have in common? A shared interest in a tiny Mediterranean island. Kastellorizo, population 500, is only 4.6 square miles in area but it has the unlikely official name of The Biggest (Megisti), which it is, compared to the smaller islands beside it. Although photogenic enough to be the site of the delightful film Mediterraneo (1991), Kastellorizo is coveted for its geostrategic importance.

Strategika

Strategika Issue 66: The Status Of The EU

via Strategika
Thursday, August 13, 2020

Strategika Issue 66 is now available online. Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Pages


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

Is there a military solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.