The Renewing Indigenous Economies Project

Explore Research

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Author

Enter comma-separated ID numbers for authors

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

Renewing Indigenous EconomiesFeatured

The Chief Joseph Freedom Index: Renewing Indigenous Economies

via PolicyEd
Friday, June 26, 2020

Explore the Chief Joseph Freedom Index (CJFI), which measures economic freedom on Indian reservations across America. Economic freedom is an important factor in driving growth, innovation, and economic mobility. The CJFI can greatly help tribal governments as they respond to problems plaguing many reservations.

Renewing Indigenous EconomiesAnalysis and Commentary

Perspectives On Renewing Indigenous Economies

by Terry Andersonvia PolicyEd
Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Hear from members of Native communities who are working to renew indigenous economies.

Renewing Indigenous EconomiesFeatured

A New Path Forward

by Terry Andersonvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, May 5, 2020

As tribal leaders rebuild their nations and renew their economies, it is time to liberate Native Americans from federal oversight.

Renewing Indigenous EconomiesFeatured

Colonialism: Then And Now

by Terry Andersonvia PolicyEd
Monday, May 4, 2020

Colonial-era policies and paternalistic attitudes continue to restrict economic activity on reservations

Renewing Indigenous EconomiesFeatured

Original Indigenous Economies

by Terry Andersonvia PolicyEd
Friday, May 1, 2020

Native Americans innovated and prospered for thousands of years before Europeans arrived. This is the 1st video in the Hoover Project on Renewing Indigenous Economies which conducts research to inform and promote policies that empower Native Americans to regain control over their lives and resources.

Renewing Indigenous Economies

Renewing Indigenous Economies: An Interview with Bill Yellowtail, Apsaalooke (Crow)

interview with Bill Yellowtailvia PolicyEd
Thursday, April 23, 2020

Bill Yellowtail grew up on his family’s cattle ranch on the Crow Indian Reservation in Montana. Holding a degree in geography from Dartmouth College, Yellowtail has been a rancher, educator, fishing guide, Montana state senator, and congressional candidate. An expert canoeist and fly fisherman, he was named Angler of the Year for 1991 by Fly Rod and Reel magazine.

Renewing Indigenous Economies

Renewing Indigenous Economies: An Interview with Daniel Stewart, Spokane Tribe

interview with Daniel Stewartvia PolicyEd
Thursday, April 23, 2020

Dan Stewart is a professor of Entrepreneurship. He received his PhD (organizational behavior) and MA (sociology) from Stanford University. His research appears in leading social science journals such as American Sociological Review, Organization Science, Research in the Sociology of Organizations, and American Indian Culture and Research Journal. He has coedited two of the leading volumes in Native American business and economics, Creating Private Sector Economies in Native America (Cambridge University Press) and American Indian Business (University of Washington Press).

Renewing Indigenous Economies

Renewing Indigenous Economies: An Interview with Sam Schimmel, Siberian Yupik & Kenaitze Indian

interview with Sam Schimmelvia PolicyEd
Thursday, April 23, 2020


Sam Schimmel is an Alaska Native with a passion for subsistence hunting and fishing, both of which keep him connected to tradition and infuse his efforts to combat the suicide, drug abuse, and cultural erosion that riddle Native communities. Having seen the effects of climate change in Alaska firsthand, Sam is also working to raise awareness of its impacts on tribal communities. He is an active member of Alaska’s Climate Action Leadership Team and serves on the Cook Inlet Tribal Youth Council as well as the Youth Advisory Board of the Center for Native American Youth.

Renewing Indigenous Economies

Renewing Indigenous Economies: An Interview with Chairman Ernest Sickey, Coushatta Tribe

interview with Ernest Sickeyvia PolicyEd
Thursday, April 23, 2020

As a leader of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana for nearly three decades and tribal chairman from 1973 to 1985, Ernest Sickey is a trailblazer in the evolution of Indian affairs in the southeastern United States. He is best known for leading his own tribal community from legal obscurity to becoming the first tribe recognized by the state of Louisiana in 1972. Sickey also played an instrumental role in securing government-to-government status for the Coushatta tribe, laying the foundation for multiple economic ventures that have since placed the Coushatta among Louisiana’s top employers.

Renewing Indigenous Economies

Renewing Indigenous Economies: An Interview with Joseph Austin, Navajo Nation

interview with Joseph Austinvia PolicyEd
Thursday, April 23, 2020


Joseph Austin is a member of the Navajo Nation and cofounder of the ACES School (Austin, Crepelle & Ernest Sickey's School for Wards and Domestic Dependent Nations), a nonprofit corporation established to help the Native nations and Native people move past wardship and shift toward the path of nationhood.

Pages

Featured Video Series:

Renewing Indigenous Economies Essays

Featured Book:

Traditional Governance among Indigenous Communities in North America

Monday, January 4, 2021
Virtual Meeting

Paper session on Traditional Governance features Hoover Visiting Fellow Dominic Parker, Hoover Campbell Fellows Donna, Christian Dippel, and Bryan Leonard, as well as other Indigenous Econ program alumni Dustin Frye and Mark Roark.

Event

Indigenous Nations Economic Development Strategies: Policies and Outcomes

Sunday, January 3, 2021
Virtual Meeting

Indigenous Nations Economic Development paper session at this years American Economic Association meeting which features two sessions by Campbell Visiting Fellow Donna. Watch the sessions here.

Event

Indigenous Student Seminar Webinar Series

Tuesday, September 1, 2020 to Tuesday, June 1, 2021
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Indigenous Student Seminar Webinar Series

Event
Featured

Hoover Institution Hosts Virtual Policy Boot Camp On Renewing Indigenous Economies

Thursday, August 27, 2020
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Institution hosted a virtual policy boot camp August 10–13 for aspiring entrepreneurs and future tribal leaders from various American Indian nations.

News

Inaugural Indigenous Student Seminar

Monday, August 10, 2020 to Wednesday, August 12, 2020
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Institution student seminar on Renewing Indigenous Economies will help Indigenous college students and recent graduates think critically about the interface between federal Indian policy and self-determination. During the week, students will learn about the evolution of property rights and trade networks before European contact; the philosophical underpinnings of indigenous notions of individualism and governance; the effects of persistent colonial policies on indigenous people and communities; and the innovations in Indian Country that are spurring economic growth.

Event
Renewing Indigenous EconomiesFeatured

The Hoover Institution’s PolicyEd Program Launches New Video Series On Renewing Indigenous Economies

Wednesday, April 29, 2020
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Institution’s PolicyEd program has launched Renewing Indigenous Economies, a new video series originated from research conducted by Senior Fellow Terry Anderson. The videos tell the story of the economic prosperity which characterized indigenous societies before Europeans arrived on American soil, and how after centuries of persecution by the federal government, these societies became among the poorest minorities in the United States.

News

Indigenous Capital, Growth, and Property Rights: The Legacy of Colonialism

Sunday, November 17, 2019 to Tuesday, November 19, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Capital investment and property rights are generally considered Western concepts exported in the era of European empire building, but pre-colonial evidence from Africa and the Americas suggest that capital investment and property rights are part of the human experience. Europeans assumed the societies they encountered in the Americas lacked the institutions and intellect necessary to fuel economic growth. Careful examination of pre-colonial and colonial societies, however, offer a different perspective—a perspective that sheds light on how indigenous people around the world can renew their economies from the ground up, rather than answering the “siren call of federal handouts."

Event

Workshop on Indigenous Property Rights and their Implication in Brazil

Monday, April 29, 2019
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

How does the recognition and demarcation of indigenous property rights affect resource use in Brazil? What can be done to renew indigenous economies in Brazil?

Event
Featured

Renewing Indigenous Economies Policy Symposium

Tuesday, October 2, 2018
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Renewing Indigenous Economies Policy Symposium" on Tuesday, October 2, 2018 from 12:00pm - 1:30pm EST.

Event

Indigenous Economies Policy Roundtable

Monday, October 1, 2018 to Tuesday, October 2, 2018
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution gathered Indigenous community leaders and policymakers from the United States, Canada, and New Zealand to identify obstacles to unlocking human capital and natural resources on reservations, and to share best practices for expanding tribal jurisdiction and improving tribal governance.

Event

Pages

The Hoover Project on Renewing Indigenous Economies is dedicated to understanding how the rich history of governance, entrepreneurship, and trade allowed indigenous peoples to thrive before colonization and how restoring these traditions can help rebuild indigenous economies, cultures, and communities from the ground up.

In North America, as the United States expanded West, traditional governments were displaced by imperialist institutions that are perpetuated by the federal government to this day. Native Americans are more likely than non-Natives to fall below the poverty line, to be assaulted, incarcerated, or to commit suicide. The disparities between Native Americans and other Americans are not the result of culture or lack of resources, but are the result of an institutional gap — a lack of secure land title, clearly defined jurisdictions, and effective governance structures. As islands of poverty in a sea of wealth, most American Indian reservations provide a stark picture of what federal government interference can do to stifle human dignity, prosperity, and freedom.

Parallel stories exist in indigenous economies throughout the Americas and, indeed, around the world, where colonizers — whether Dutch, French, Portuguese, or Spanish — similarly displaced peoples and disregarded traditional cultures, governance structures, and ownership claims.

As Hoover’s research and successful indigenous economies have shown, renewing indigenous economies is a matter of adapting old institutions that worked and discovering new ones that allow reservation communities and residents to fully participate in and benefit from the modern global economy.

The Hoover Project on Renewing Indigenous Economies works with scholars, tribal leaders, educators, and emerging indigenous leaders from around the world to foster the exchange of knowledge and skills necessary for successful tribal governance and entrepreneurship; promotes policy education to inform people of the obstacles faced by tribal leaders and entrepreneurs; and advances reforms that would remove those obstacles.