Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group

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Public Perceptions Of Technology Companies And Possible Government Actions

by David Brady, Douglas Riversvia Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Papers
Tuesday, March 8, 2022

TEG Working Paper 22101

Bipartisan initiatives to regulate Big Tech continue to gain traction in Congress amidst allegations that these firms have stifled competition and mismanaged private data. This paper analyzes survey data from 2,048 American adults to examine whether public sentiments about US tech companies align with the dominant narratives in the media and on the Hill.

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A New Gilded Age? Public Opinion, Antitrust, and the Dangers to Market Competition

by Manny Rincon-Cruzvia Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Papers
Sunday, July 25, 2021

TEG Working Paper 21102

Fears of a second Gilded Age—of the excessive wealth and power of America’s biggest corporations—have put antitrust back on the Presidential agenda.

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California Technology Business Exits: Why They Are Happening And What To Do

by Lee Ohanianvia Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Papers
Friday, July 23, 2021

TEG Working Paper 21101

The nearly coincident announcements in December 2020 by Silicon Valley giants Hewlett Packard Enterprises, Oracle, and Tesla that they all were relocating their headquarters and future operations to Texas brought international headlines to businesses, particularly high technology businesses, leaving California. This paper documents business and household exits over time and analyzes why they are occurring.

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China, Big Tech, And Cyber Defense: The World According To Zegart

interview with Amy Zegartvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

In this wide-ranging conversation, Professor Zegart discusses the US relationship with China and how she views that country’s aggressive stance toward Taiwan; why big tech companies are a potential threat not only to privacy, but also to our national security; and why the next war may well be fought with a keyboard rather than on a battlefield.

Featured

Experts Address Harnessing Technological Innovation For America’s Competitive Edge

featuring John B. Taylor, Amy Zegartvia Hoover Daily Report
Thursday, May 27, 2021

During a session at the Hoover Institution’s 2021 Virtual Spring Retreat in April, Hoover scholars, accompanied by military and business leaders, explored the role of technology in national security strategy, as well as government’s role in fostering innovation. In what marked the first public session of Hoover’s Working Group on Technology, Economics, and Governance, participants included the project’s cochairs, senior fellows John B. Taylor and Amy Zegart; former CISCO chair and CEO John T. Chambers; and retired US Air Force chief of staff, General David Goldfein.

Hoover Institution Launches Technology, Economics, And Governance Working Group

Monday, May 17, 2021

The Hoover Institution has launched a new working group charged with assessing the opportunities and risks presented by breakthrough technologies for America’s economy, democratic governance, and national security interests.

Introducing the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group

by John B. Taylor, Amy Zegartvia Hoover Daily Report
Friday, April 30, 2021

New technologies—from Internet advances to artificial intelligence to synthetic biology and many more—are transforming the global economy and connecting us in ways unimaginable only a few years ago. Emerging technologies are offering unmatched opportunities to alleviate poverty, raise economic growth, treat disease, and improve lives all over the world. But these technologies are also fueling new geopolitical competition between the United States and China and they are posing unprecedented governance challenges to domestic political institutions. The purpose of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group at the Hoover Institution is to address these and other questions that lie at the nexus of technology, economics, and governance.

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Chair
George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics
Morris Arnold and Nona Jean Cox Senior Fellow

Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | May 13 - 20

Friday, May 20, 2022

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s roundup covers Turkey’s opposition to Sweden and Finland’s bids for NATO membership, President Biden’s trip to Asia, external threats to the African economy, Chinese hackers’ actions targeting Russian tech, and continued federal and state battles to regulate big tech and Americans’ changing views of the regulatory environment. Additionally, online communities may be encouraging lone-wolf extremists, the US military leverages AR for training, startups feel the pain of increasing VC scrutiny, and a Tesla driver will go to trial for vehicular manslaughter. Take our reader survey to share your feedback about the News Roundup!

News

Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | May 6 - 13

Friday, May 13, 2022

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s roundup features coverage of the Chinese economy’s response to Western sanctions against Russia and dampened exports resulting from COVID lockdowns and decreasing US demand. Additionally, Alvaro Bedoya is confirmed to join the FTC, a bill to establish a new Big Tech watchdog is introduced in the Senate, RAND and Brookings publish analyses of incorporation of AI tools in military operations, a ransomware attack devastates Costa Rica, the US and Ukraine collaborate on cybersecurity, California raises the minimum wage in response to inflation, and Reuters uncovers evidence that US police instructors have ties to white supremacist groups. 

News

Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | April 29 - May 6

Friday, May 6, 2022

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s roundup covers indications of a North Korean nuclear test, Putin’s strategy in Ukraine, the anti-satellite test ban, the risk to consumers posed by big tech legislation, President Biden’s new national security memo on quantum, and Governor Newsom’s steps to regulate cryptocurrency. Additional topics include using wide-area motion imagery technology for anomaly detection, the role of AI in a US-China conflict, and the implications of codifying “extremism” at the federal level. 

News

Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | April 22 - 29

Friday, April 29, 2022

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s roundup covers Secretary Austin’s remarks in Ukraine, Germany’s position on an EU oil embargo, Beijing’s economic measures to mitigate the effects of COVID shutdowns, NATO’s affirmation of a cyber Article 5 response, and increasing cyber attacks against Russia. Additionally, two US representatives call for greater GPS modernization, NGA takes over Project Maven, CA energy subsidies may be increasing consumption instead of efficiency, Elon Musk frustrates Big Tech regulators, and shadowbanning is decreasing social media users’ trust.

News
Analysis and Commentary

A Conversation About Russian Sanctions And The Future Of Sanctions

Monday, April 25, 2022
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Institution Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group hosted A Conversation about Russian Sanctions and the Future of Sanctions on Monday, April 25, 2022.

Event

Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | April 15 - 22

Friday, April 22, 2022

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s roundup includes coverage of declining US-Saudi relations, Russia’s ICBM test, Biden’s options to respond to a Russian cyber attack and how state and local organizations can prepare, and Elon Musk’s ambitions for Twitter. Additionally, Steve Blank recommends a new US civil-military innovation strategy, analysts argue the DoD is not doing enough to adopt AI capabilities, California introduces a new bill to protect employees from workplace surveillance, and Congress continues to consider the American Innovation and Choice Act, while Brookings outlines the benefits of a new digital regulatory agency to manage US tech policy.

News

Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | April 8 - April 15

Friday, April 15, 2022

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s roundup highlights a variety of international responses to Russian activities in Ukraine, a North Korean cryptocurrency heist, critical infrastructure vulnerabilities to a new hacker toolset, and DoD’s continued quest for cutting-edge technology. Additionally, Apple CEO Tim Cook fights back against big tech regulation, unicorns prove the importance of geography to innovation hubs, and RAND examines the spread of extremist ideologies online.

News

Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | April 1 - 8

Friday, April 8, 2022

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s roundup features Russia’s retreat from Kyiv, US hypersonic missile tests and neutralization of Russian malware, lockdowns in Shanghai to stall the spread of COVID-19, and an interview with former President Trump looking back at the January 6th insurrection. Additional news covers opposing views of the American Innovation and Choice Online Act, Silicon Valley’s search for the next tech necessity, the State Department’s new Bureau of Cyberspace and Digital Policy, and human-machine teaming in the military.

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Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | March 18 - April 1

Friday, April 1, 2022

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

We’re back after spring break! This week’s roundup reviews Russian and North Korean missile claims, Putin’s misguided tactics in Ukraine and possible cyber threats to the US, and recommendations for countering Chinese gray zone activities. Additionally, antitrust legislation continues moving forward in the EU and the US, DARPA looks to AI to help triage casualties on the battlefield, Toronto rivals US tech hub contenders, and analysts assess DoD’s progress countering extremism from within. 

News

Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | March 11 - 18

Friday, March 18, 2022

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s edition highlights US military aid to Ukraine, Anonymous’ cyber attacks on Russian websites, US-China talks, and the impact of pricing Saudi oil in yuan instead of dollars. Additionally, new antitrust regulation is introduced on the Hill, Shield Capital raises a fund for dual-use technology, the Pentagon reorganizes data and AI activities, the Belfer Center analyzes North Korean Cyber tactics, digitalization impacts Silicon Valley’s geographic dominance, and DHS assesses extremism from within.

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The Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group seeks to understand the drivers and dynamics of technological innovation in the 21st century, assess the opportunities and risks that breakthrough technologies are creating, and develop governance approaches that maximize the benefits and mitigate the risks for the nation and the world. Facts and objective analysis are the keys to the approach.


As described in more detail in this statement of purpose, the Working Group conducts original research, brings together private sector and public sector leaders, and develops policy recommendations for decision-makers at all levels of government.

New technologies—from Internet advances to artificial intelligence to synthetic biology and many more—are transforming the global economy and connecting us in ways unimaginable only a few years ago. Emerging technologies are offering unmatched opportunities to alleviate poverty, raise economic growth, treat disease, and improve lives all over the world. But these technologies are also fueling new geopolitical competition and they are posing unprecedented governance challenges to domestic political institutions.

Policymakers today are grappling with a host of difficult questions. Congressional proposals are increasingly calling for ways to reduce the power of large tech firms, from breaking them up to regulating them or taxing them. Yet it is not evident that any of these solutions will solve the problems the nation confronts with emerging technologies, and many of these approaches could hurt the nation by hobbling American innovation. Is the problem monopoly power, which leads to higher prices, or is it the power to exclude certain individuals or firms from using the platforms? How would break-ups take place, and would they depend on the market and the product? Are there better ways to proceed that do not throw out the scale advantages and greater global interconnectedness?