Strategika

Subscribe to receive Strategika. Subscribe »

Friday, September 24, 2021

Issue 75

America After Afghanistan
Background Essay
Background Essay

Our Revels Now Are Ended

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Friday, September 24, 2021

It’s hard to win a war when you refuse to understand your enemy. It’s harder still when you cannot realistically define your strategic mission. You lame yourself further when you reduce a complex history to a single inaccurate cliché; i.e., “Afghanistan is the graveyard of empires.”

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

Afghanistan Post-Mortem

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Friday, September 24, 2021

The United States has lost its longest war. After twenty years of conflict and nation building in Afghanistan, the U.S.-backed Afghan regime collapsed like a house of cards in just a few weeks after the announced departure of American and NATO troops from the country. A final flurry of activity by the U.S. military managed to rescue 123,000 people from Kabul, but as Winston Churchill once said of Dunkirk, “Wars are not won by evacuations.”

Featured Commentary

Dented, Not Damaged: The American Empire After Afghanistan

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Friday, September 24, 2021

When small, even middle-sized powers make grievous mistakes like fighting a losing war or ignoring deadly threats, they risk their place in the global hierarchy or, worse, their existence. Thus did France and Britain when they failed to fight Nazi Germany in the Thirties while still in position of strategic superiority. 

E.g., 10 / 25 / 2021
E.g., 10 / 25 / 2021
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Issue 71

Domestic Dissent and U.S. Foreign Relations

Background Essay

by Mark Moyar Tuesday, March 9, 2021
article

Featured Commentary

by Edward N. Luttwak Tuesday, March 9, 2021
article
by Miles Maochun Yu Tuesday, March 9, 2021
article

Related Commentary

by General Jim Mattis Wednesday, March 10, 2021
video
by H. R. McMaster Wednesday, March 10, 2021
podcast
by H. R. McMaster Wednesday, March 10, 2021
podcast
Thursday, January 28, 2021

Issue 70

The U.S.–Russia Relationship

Background Essay

by Seth Cropsey Thursday, January 28, 2021
article

Featured Commentary

by Josef Joffe Thursday, January 28, 2021
article
by Hy Rothstein Thursday, January 28, 2021
article

Related Commentary

by Angelo M. Codevilla Thursday, January 28, 2021
article
by Chris Gibson Thursday, January 28, 2021
article
by Jakub Grygiel Thursday, January 28, 2021
article
by Walter Russell Mead Thursday, January 28, 2021
article
by Mark Moyar Thursday, January 28, 2021
article
by Williamson Murray Thursday, January 28, 2021
article
by Ralph Peters Thursday, January 28, 2021
article
by Andrew Roberts Thursday, January 28, 2021
article
by Zafiris Rossidis Thursday, January 28, 2021
article
Wednesday, December 9, 2020

Issue 69

China and the Pandemic

Background Essay

by John Yoo Wednesday, December 9, 2020
article

Featured Commentary

by Gordon G. Chang Wednesday, December 9, 2020
article
by Robert G. Kaufman Wednesday, December 9, 2020
article

Related Commentary

by Edward N. Luttwak Wednesday, December 9, 2020
article
by Christopher R. O'Dea Wednesday, December 9, 2020
article
by Paul Rahe Wednesday, December 9, 2020
article
by Barry Strauss Wednesday, December 9, 2020
article
by Bing West Wednesday, December 9, 2020
article
Thursday, October 22, 2020

Issue 68

Crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean

Background Essay

by Soner Cagaptay Thursday, October 22, 2020
article

Featured Commentary

by Zafiris Rossidis Thursday, October 22, 2020
article
by Barry Strauss Thursday, October 22, 2020
article

Related Commentary

by Barry Strauss Tuesday, August 18, 2020
article
by Barry Strauss Thursday, August 27, 2020
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Saturday, October 10, 2020
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Friday, October 9, 2020
article

Pages

Explore Research

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Author

Section

Enter comma-separated IDs of authors
Enter comma-separated IDs of contributors

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

Strategika

Strategika Issue 74: The Prospects Of A New Iran Deal

via Strategika
Wednesday, August 4, 2021

Strategika Issue 74 is now available online. Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Related Commentary

The Constitution and the JCPOA

by John Yoovia Strategika
Monday, August 2, 2021

The first great conflict of Joseph Biden’s presidency will erupt on the field of foreign policy. In his most significant foreign policy achievement, Donald Trump withdrew from Barack Obama’s Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), which traded limits on Iran’s nuclear program for billions of dollars and an end to Western economic sanctions. In his knee-jerk rejection of all things Trump, the former Senator and Vice President has promised that he would immediately re-join the JCPOA in his hopeless quest for a peaceful settlement with the mullahs in Teheran.

Related Commentary

The Biden Administration and Middle East Stability

by Barry Straussvia Strategika
Monday, August 2, 2021

The Middle East is one of the world’s most volatile regions. How can the United States use its power to help bring peace there? A blessing in and of itself, Middle East peace would also free the U.S. to turn its attention to what is now an area of greater strategic importance to it, the Asia-Pacific region.

Related Commentary

China, Iran, and Russia in the Middle East and the S.E. Mediterranean

by Zafiris Rossidisvia Strategika
Monday, August 2, 2021

On March 27, 2021, China and Iran signed a 25-year strategic cooperation agreement reaffirming China’s effort to build an Asian axis of alliances and penetrate the Middle East. Russia cooperates with both of them as well as with Turkey, but also pursues its own strategy in the Middle East and with the Middle Eastern and North African countries.

Related Commentary

Xerxes Made Us Do It: Iran, the Biden Administration, and Mid-East Instability

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Monday, August 2, 2021

Americans obsess over means, while our enemies focus on purpose. American decision-makers and their paladins focus so intently on the practical requirements of an Iranian nuclear weapon that we forget to ask why this Persian-majority state wants one, thus obscuring simultaneous Iranian initiatives designed to achieve the same strategic ends through other means.

Related Commentary

Revisiting Past Mistakes: A Revival of the Iranian Nuclear Deal

by Robert G. Kaufmanvia Strategika
Monday, August 2, 2021

Samuel Johnson described a second marriage as a triumph of hope over experience. This adage sums up the Biden administration’s determination to revive Obama’s dangerous doctrine in the Middle East that failed dismally the first time around. Worse, this reprise of past mistakes threatens to undo the significant though provisional progress the Trump administration achieved in the region by doing exactly the opposite of its predecessor.

Related Commentary

Will Biden’s Outreach to Iran Increase or Erode Middle East Stability?

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Monday, August 2, 2021

Barack Obama’s tilt toward Tehran and away from Israel-cum-Arabs was as imprudent as Joe Biden’s tilt II promises to be now. First, it is bad realpolitik. As housekeeper of the global order, the U.S. will not thrive by bandwagoning with the local would-be hegemon, in this case Iran. The task is exactly the opposite: to corral local powers into a coalition balancing against Iran.

Related Commentary

The Path Forward with Iran

by Chris Gibson via Strategika
Monday, August 2, 2021

We are half a year into the new Biden administration, but the complexity and frustration surrounding U.S. policy towards Iran that have vexed earlier administrations are already readily apparent.

Related Commentary

Destabilizing Detente

by Seth Cropseyvia Strategika
Monday, August 2, 2021

Renewed detente with Iran will undermine Near Eastern stability. Iran is more secure than it was in 2016. Despite the damage economic sanctions have done, Iran has escalated its campaign in the Levant, continued its pressure in Yemen, and more recently signed an economic agreement with China that will insulate it from the worst of renewed American punishment if it is found in breach of a new nuclear deal.

Featured Commentary

Can U.S.-Iranian Relations Be Remade?

by Hy Rothsteinvia Strategika
Monday, August 2, 2021

The Biden administration is taking steps to restore the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or the JCPOA, and lift sanctions imposed by the Trump administration that are inconsistent with the accord. The new administration also assumes that a resurrected JCPOA will be the basis for future agreements to address other areas of concern, including Iran’s ballistic missile program and actions through its proxies that destabilize the Middle East.

Pages


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

Is there a military solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

Stay Up To Date!

Be notified when an new issue is available.

Subscriptions »

RSS Feed Subscription

subscribe and listen on iTunes

Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

To stay up to date when new issues are released, sign up here to be notified when a new Strategika is available.

Subscriptions »

 

The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.