Strategika

Subscribe to receive Strategika. Subscribe »

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Issue 53

U.S. Engagement with Russia
Background Essay
Background Essay

Toe-To-Toe With The Russkis: Is Realistic Engagement With The Russians Still Possible?

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Wednesday, September 5, 2018

In the greatest film ever made about the human dimensions of strategy, director Stanley Kubrick’s Cold-War masterpiece, Doctor Strangelove, an excited strategic bomber pilot speaks of “noo-cullar combat, toe-to-toe with the Russkis.” But the lengthy annals of Americans and Russians tramping on each other’s feet followed a brief interlude when we danced the light fantastic to our mutual benefit, with neither side’s dancing shoes scuffed.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

The Way Forward With Putin And Russia

by Chris Gibson via Strategika
Wednesday, September 5, 2018

In late August 2016, I led a Congressional Delegation trip to Israel, Latvia, Poland, and Germany to gather information and build support for the POSTURE Act, a Bill to reverse the Obama administration’s drawdown of U.S. armed forces and deter further Russian aggression in eastern Europe. On day four of that trip we were in Latvia listening intently to Edgars Rinkevics, the Foreign Minister, explain his dismay with then-presidential candidate Donald Trump’s recent comments questioning the relevancy of NATO. 

Featured Commentary

The United States And Russia: Opposite Personalities

by Thomas Donnellyvia Strategika
Wednesday, September 5, 2018

In his famous 1947 “Long Telegram” and subsequent Foreign Affairs article, George Kennan described what he thought was the “political personality of Soviet power.” It was an effort at what he called a “task of psychological analysis” to discern a “pattern of thought” and the “nature of the mental world of the Soviet leaders.” 

E.g., 9 / 25 / 2018
E.g., 9 / 25 / 2018
Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Issue 49

The Value of Economic Sanctions

Background Essay

by Josef Joffe Thursday, March 29, 2018
article

Featured Commentary

by Angelo M. Codevilla Thursday, March 29, 2018
article
by Thomas Donnelly Thursday, March 29, 2018
article

Related Commentary

by Thomas H. Henriksen Tuesday, July 18, 2017
article
by Reuel Marc Gerecht, Mark Dubowitz Sunday, November 10, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Tuesday, July 21, 2015
article
by Thomas H. Henriksen Friday, October 30, 1998
article
Monday, February 26, 2018

Issue 48

U.S. Military Policy in Afghanistan

Background Essay

by Hy Rothstein, John Arquilla Monday, February 26, 2018
article

Featured Commentary

by Bing West Monday, February 26, 2018
article
by Max Boot Monday, February 26, 2018
article

Related Commentary

by Thomas Donnelly Monday, February 26, 2018
article
by Mark Moyar Monday, February 26, 2018
article
by Ralph Peters Monday, February 26, 2018
article
Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Issue 47

The State of U.S. Naval Readiness

Background Essay

by Seth Cropsey Tuesday, January 16, 2018
article

Featured Commentary

by Admiral James O. Ellis Jr. Tuesday, January 16, 2018
article
by Admiral Gary Roughead Tuesday, January 16, 2018
article

Related Commentary

by Thomas Donnelly Tuesday, January 16, 2018
article
Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Issue 46

Conventional War Against North Korea

Background Essay

by Michael R. Auslin Wednesday, November 15, 2017
article

Featured Commentary

by Thomas Donnelly Wednesday, November 15, 2017
article
by Miles Maochun Yu Wednesday, November 15, 2017
article

Related Commentary

by Angelo M. Codevilla Wednesday, November 15, 2017
article
by Josef Joffe Wednesday, November 15, 2017
article
by Peter R. Mansoor Wednesday, November 15, 2017
article
by Barry Strauss Wednesday, November 15, 2017
article
by Miles Maochun Yu Wednesday, November 15, 2017
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Thursday, September 28, 2017
article
by Thomas H. Henriksen Thursday, August 24, 2017
article

Pages

Explore Research

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Author

Section

Enter comma-separated IDs of authors
Enter comma-separated IDs of contributors

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

Featured Commentary

Is Turkey No Longer Part Of The West?

by Paul Rahevia Strategika
Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Almost a century has passed since the Ottoman Empire was dismembered and Mustafa Kemal set out to build the modern Turkish state on its ruins. Twenty years ago, no one in the West would have called into question the achievement of the man who eventually, with considerable justice, styled himself Atatürk (“Father of the Turks”). But many now fear that the political and cultural revolution he instigated in the 1920s will be overturned and that Turkey will cease to function as normal nation state, turn on the West, and try to upend the existing order in the eastern Mediterranean, the Balkans, and the Middle East.

Background Essay

The New Sultan And The Crisis Of Modern Turkey

by Soner Cagaptayvia Strategika
Tuesday, July 31, 2018

The failed coup of July 15, 2016 has irreversibly transformed Turkish politics. Although the coup attempt was thankfully thwarted, the path that Erdogan chose to take after the coup—using the state of emergency powers he was given to go specifically after coup plotters, to embark instead on a much broader campaign against all dissidents, many of whom possessed no ties to the coup in any form—highlights an unfortunate truth about the country: Turkey is in a deep crisis.

Featured Commentary

A Bigger Arsenal For A Lasting Peace

by Thomas Donnellyvia Strategika
Monday, June 25, 2018

Where is Stanley Kubrick when you need him? With Donald Trump withdrawing from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (aka “the Iran deal”), playing summit footsie with Kim Jong Un and scoping out a vigorous modernization of the aging U.S. nuclear force, the abyssopelagic layer of the Deep State has taken on new life with warnings of the approaching apocalypse.

Background Essay

Should More Nations Have Nukes?

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Monday, June 25, 2018

There is only one weapon that poses an existential threat to the United States, so why should America want other nations to possess it? The simple answer is that Washington’s nonproliferation policy, which once slowed the spread of nuclear weapons, now looks to be on the verge of collapse. 

Strategika Issue 51: Nuclear Proliferation

via Strategika
Monday, June 25, 2018

Strategika Issue 51 is now available online. Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Featured Commentary

Beware Greeks Bearing Gifts: Strategic Competition And The North Korea Talks

by Thomas Karakovia Strategika
Monday, June 25, 2018

The United States has long been committed to stemming the further proliferation of nuclear weapons among both potential adversaries and friends alike. As the recent Nuclear Posture Review observes, “nuclear non-proliferation today faces acute challenges.” The current locus of this challenge is in northeast Asia.

Featured Commentary

Pakistan: Murderous Ally, Patient Enemy

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Thursday, April 26, 2018

Pakistan’s military and intelligence leadership—the country’s decisive elements—view the United States as a danger to be managed and a resource to be exploited. Its approach to bilateral relations is predicated on three things: The (correct) belief that U.S. interlocutors do not understand the region; the conviction that, eventually, the U.S. will leave Afghanistan; and Pakistan’s need for hegemony over Afghanistan—not only to check India’s strategic moves but, more importantly, to guarantee Pakistan’s internal cohesion.

Background Essay

The United States And Pakistan: Frenemies On The Brink

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Thursday, April 26, 2018
For much of its short seventy-year history, Pakistan has managed to thoroughly mismanage its strategic relationships with great power patrons, regional competitors, and non-state clients. It has waged and lost four wars with a larger and more powerful India, supported terrorist organizations that have destabilized Afghanistan and conducted deadly attacks in neighboring India, and alienated its long-time American ally.
Featured Commentary

Pakistan: Neither Ally, Nor Enemy

by Bing West via Strategika
Thursday, April 26, 2018

Last April, Ambassador Robert D. Blackwill, a distinguished diplomat, summarized American policy toward Pakistan. “Every time a new administration in Washington comes to office,” he said, “they get worried about Pakistan, which has a stockpile of nuclear weapons. The US Secretary of State then visits Pakistan and meets the top leadership.

Strategika Issue 50: Pakistan's Partnership With The United States

via Strategika
Thursday, April 26, 2018

Strategika Issue 50 is now available online. Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Pages


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

Is there a military solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

Stay Up To Date!

Be notified when an new issue is available.

Subscriptions »

RSS Feed Subscription

subscribe and listen on iTunes

Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

To stay up to date when new issues are released, sign up here to be notified when a new Strategika is available.

Subscriptions »

 

The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.