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Friday, May 29, 2020

Issue 65

U.S. Recognition of Taiwan
Background Essay
Background Essay

Taiwan: “The Struggle Continues”

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Friday, May 29, 2020

“Reunification is a historical inevitability of the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation,” declared Beijing’s Taiwan Affairs Office in May, promoting the idea that Taiwan will be absorbed into the People’s Republic of China. In history, however, there is nothing foreordained, predestined, or inevitable. Just ask Henry Kissinger.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

Recognize Taiwan

by Seth Cropseyvia Strategika
Friday, May 29, 2020

On 12 May, New Zealand Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters stated that his nation will support Taiwan’s inclusion in the World Health Assembly at the organization’s meeting the following week. The Assembly governs the World Health Organization, the international body tasked with fighting pandemics like COVID-19. China has excluded Taiwan from the WHA since 2017, after participating in sessions as an observer since 2009.

Featured Commentary

Taiwan

by John Yoo, Robert J. Delahuntyvia Strategika
Friday, May 29, 2020

As the confrontation between the United States and China intensifies, Taiwan will occupy a pivotal place. Since becoming the site of the exiled Nationalist Chinese government after the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) conquest of mainland China in 1949, the island state has become a flourishing and prosperous liberal democracy boasting the 21st-largest economy in the world.

E.g., 7 / 10 / 2020
E.g., 7 / 10 / 2020
Friday, May 29, 2020

Issue 65

U.S. Recognition of Taiwan

Background Essay

by Gordon G. Chang Friday, May 29, 2020
article

Featured Commentary

by Seth Cropsey Friday, May 29, 2020
article
by John Yoo, Robert J. Delahunty Friday, May 29, 2020
article
Thursday, April 23, 2020

Issue 64

China After the Pandemic

Background Essay

by Michael R. Auslin Thursday, April 23, 2020
article

Featured Commentary

by Gordon G. Chang Thursday, April 23, 2020
article
by Ralph Peters Thursday, April 23, 2020
article

Related Commentary

by H. R. McMaster Monday, April 20, 2020
article
by Niall Ferguson Monday, April 6, 2020
article
by Michael R. Auslin Tuesday, March 31, 2020
article
interview with Michael R. Auslin Friday, March 20, 2020
podcast
by Michael R. Auslin Wednesday, March 18, 2020
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Tuesday, March 17, 2020
article
by Michael R. Auslin Friday, February 7, 2020
article
by Michael R. Auslin Tuesday, April 7, 2020
article
by Michael R. Auslin Friday, March 27, 2020
article
interview with Elizabeth Economy Monday, April 20, 2020
video
by Elizabeth Economy Monday, February 10, 2020
article
by Jakub Grygiel Thursday, April 16, 2020
article
interview with Victor Davis Hanson Thursday, April 9, 2020
video
by CAPT Chris Sharman Tuesday, March 31, 2020
article
by John Yoo, Ivana Stradner Monday, April 6, 2020
article
Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Issue 63

Should the United States Leave the Middle East?

Background Essay

by Edward N. Luttwak Tuesday, March 31, 2020
article

Featured Commentary

by Peter R. Mansoor Tuesday, March 31, 2020
article
by Admiral James O. Ellis Jr. Tuesday, March 31, 2020
article
Friday, December 27, 2019

Issue 62

Is the Mediterranean Still Geo-strategically Essential?

Background Essay

by Barry Strauss Friday, December 27, 2019
article

Featured Commentary

by Ralph Peters Friday, December 27, 2019
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Friday, December 27, 2019
article

Related Commentary

by Gordon G. Chang Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Chris Gibson Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Jakub Grygiel Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Josef Joffe Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Robert G. Kaufman Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Peter R. Mansoor Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Mark Moyar Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Christopher R. O'Dea Thursday, November 7, 2019
article
by Ralph Peters Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Hy Rothstein Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Nadia Schadlow Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Bing West Friday, January 10, 2020
article

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Featured Commentary

Taiwan

by John Yoo, Robert J. Delahuntyvia Strategika
Friday, May 29, 2020

As the confrontation between the United States and China intensifies, Taiwan will occupy a pivotal place. Since becoming the site of the exiled Nationalist Chinese government after the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) conquest of mainland China in 1949, the island state has become a flourishing and prosperous liberal democracy boasting the 21st-largest economy in the world.

Featured Commentary

Recognize Taiwan

by Seth Cropseyvia Strategika
Friday, May 29, 2020

On 12 May, New Zealand Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters stated that his nation will support Taiwan’s inclusion in the World Health Assembly at the organization’s meeting the following week. The Assembly governs the World Health Organization, the international body tasked with fighting pandemics like COVID-19. China has excluded Taiwan from the WHA since 2017, after participating in sessions as an observer since 2009.

Background Essay

Taiwan: “The Struggle Continues”

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Friday, May 29, 2020

“Reunification is a historical inevitability of the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation,” declared Beijing’s Taiwan Affairs Office in May, promoting the idea that Taiwan will be absorbed into the People’s Republic of China. In history, however, there is nothing foreordained, predestined, or inevitable. Just ask Henry Kissinger.

Strategika

Strategika Issue 65: U.S. Recognition Of Taiwan

via Strategika
Friday, May 29, 2020

Strategika Issue 65 is now available online. Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Strategika

Strategika Issue 64: China After The Pandemic

via Strategika
Thursday, April 23, 2020

Strategika Issue 64 is now available online. Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Background Essay

The Coronacrisis Will Simply Exacerbate The Geo-Strategic Competition Between Beijing And Washington

by Michael R. Auslinvia Strategika
Thursday, April 23, 2020

Even before the outbreak of the novel coronavirus in Wuhan, China late last year, the Sino-U.S. relationship had been in a period of flux. Since coming to office in 2017, President Trump made rebalancing ties with China the centerpiece of his foreign policy. Claiming that it would no longer be business as usual with Beijing, Trump began to respond more forcefully to what he had long claimed were unfair Chinese trade practices, cyberespionage, military intimidation, and global propaganda campaigns.

Featured Commentary

China Is Flailing in a Post-Coronavirus World

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Thursday, April 23, 2020

Beijing’s propagandists believe the coronavirus pandemic will bring about the end of U.S. hegemony, “the American Century” as they call it. They are right in one narrow sense. The disease, which has reached almost every country and crippled societies across continents, has the feel of an epoch-ending event. What is likely to end, however, is not U.S. leadership. It’s Beijing’s audacious grab for global dominance.

Featured Commentary

China Lies, China Kills, China Wins

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Thursday, April 23, 2020

As a plague compounds our political divisions, it’s essential to recall that the cause of the global carnage is not across the congressional aisle or parliamentary divide. This pandemic came courtesy of the breathtaking (literally, in this case) ruthlessness of the Chinese dictatorship, whose policies nurtured, hid, and fostered the spread of the COVID-19 virus currently killing our citizens by the tens of thousands and crippling economies worldwide.

Related Commentary

Elizabeth Economy: After COVID-19: China's Role In The World And U.S.-China Relations

interview with Elizabeth Economyvia Council on Foreign Relations
Monday, April 20, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Elizabeth Economy discusses China and the US-China relationship in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Related Commentary

How China Sees The World

by H. R. McMastervia The Atlantic
Monday, April 20, 2020

And how we should see China.

Pages


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.