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Featured

Why GDP Still Matters

by Bjorn Lomborgvia Project Syndicate
Thursday, June 20, 2019

New Zealand’s focus on wellbeing, rather than GDP, may have the best of intentions. But if GDP does not increase, the government will have less money for its grand schemes. And compared to what it could have had, the country will have less overall wellbeing, worse environmental performance, and weaker human capital.

Featured

Why Are The Western Middle Classes So Angry?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Bozeman Daily Chronicle (MT)
Wednesday, June 12, 2019

What is going on with the unending Brexit drama, the aftershocks of Donald Trump’s election and the “yellow vests” protests in France? What drives the growing estrangement of southern and eastern Europe from the European Union establishment? What fuels the anti-EU themes of recent European elections and the stunning recent Australian re-election of conservatives?

In the News

Are We Confusing Money With Well-Being? New Zealand Believes So.

quoting Michael Spencevia Big Think
Thursday, June 6, 2019

Politicians love to flaunt economic growth. A healthy gross domestic product (GDP) means an economy is doing well, which means the country is doing well, which means its citizens are doing well. It's all thanks to sagacious policy crafted by our savvy political leaders.

In the News

No Catastrophe

quoting Bruce Thorntonvia Carolina Coast Online
Friday, May 31, 2019

While climate change is a political loser, as we noted in the May 18 Australian election when the Liberal-National Coalition, stressing economic growth, tax cuts and support for Australia’s energy producers, united conservatives and tossed out the opposition center-left Labor Party, climate change activists are now resorting to a change in semantics to try and curry favor.

In the News

Now Julian Assange Is A Martyr

quoting Jack Goldsmithvia The Atlantic
Friday, May 24, 2019
Julian Assange, the Australian national who founded WikiLeaks, was indicted Thursday for soliciting classified information from an American whistle-blower in 2010 and publishing sensitive military files as well as State Department cables.
In the News

The Right-Wing Populist Playbook Keeps Winning

quoting Melvyn B. Kraussvia Bloomberg
Monday, May 20, 2019

If you enjoyed the right-wing populist surge that led to President Donald Trump and Brexit, then have we got good news for you: It’s still going strong.

Featured

Bosnia Is Everywhere — Even In Christchurch

by Niall Fergusonvia Boston Globe
Monday, March 25, 2019

It is more than a quarter of a century since Bosnia descended into a bloody conflict that claimed tens of thousands of lives. Since the massacre of 50 Muslim men, women, and children in Christchurch, New Zealand, I have found myself wondering: Is the world turning into a giant Bosnia?

In the News

Front Page Podcast: Concerns NZ Govt Turning Blind Eye To China Meddling

quoting Hoover Institutionvia Hawthorn Caller
Sunday, March 24, 2019
Each weekday The Front Page keeps you up to date with the biggest news in New Zealand. Today it‘s concerns our Government is complacent about China‘s influence in New Zealand, thousands paid out for wrongful meth evictions, lightning strike injures four people, and one restaurant proves you can be successful while paying the living wage. Hosted by Frances Cook.
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The U.S.-China Global Dance

by David C. Mulfordvia Defining Ideas
Friday, March 15, 2019

We need clear economic leadership to avert the next financial crisis.

In the News

Australia Would Choose Security Over Economic Ties With China: Costello

quoting Niall Fergusonvia The Bull (Australia)
Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Future Fund chairman Peter Costello believes security will be the biggest factor that defines Australia’s relationship with China moving forward, even if any decision on the access and sharing of technology would have a negative impact on the economy.

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