Hoover visiting fellow Gabriela Tarazona-Sevillano addresses the question of whether terrorists can be tried in civilian courts using lessons learned from the Shining Path experience in Peru

Thursday, February 10, 2011
Hoover visiting fellow Gabriela Tarazona-Sevillano
Image credit: 
Tin Tin Wisniewski
Hoover visiting fellow Gabriela Tarazona-Sevillano
Image credit: 
Tin Tin Wisniewski
Hoover visiting fellow Gabriela Tarazona-Sevillano

Hoover visiting fellow Gabriela Tarazona-Sevillano was a criminal affairs prosecuting attorney in Peru and has taught for many years in the United States. She is author of Sendero Luminoso and the Threat of Narcoterrorism. In a lecture at the Stanford Law School on Thursday, February 10, sponsored by the Hoover Archives and the Stanford International Law Society, Tarazona-Sevillano discussed whether military or civilian courts would be best suited for terrorist trials. Drawing on examples from Peru, where she conducted research on the trial of Sendero's maximum leader and other members of the organization's leadership group, she pointed out lessons that the United States can learn from Peru's experience.