Hoover Institution announces National Fellows for 1999-2000 academic year.

Friday, April 30, 1999
STANFORD

Hoover Institution Director John Raisian has announced the recipients of the annual post-doctoral National and Peace Fellowships for the 1999-2000 academic year. During this past year the fellowship was renamed "The W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo Campbell National Fellows Program", in honor of the Hoover Director (Emeritus) who founded the program in 1971.

The National Fellows' year affords junior scholars time free from teaching to advance their professional careers by completing an original and significant research project at the Hoover Institution. Since its inception, the National Fellows Program has awarded more than 360 fellowships to outstanding scholars from universities across the United States and Canada. Stanford faculty members have received more than ten percent of those awards over the last two decades.

Recognized as one of the preeminent fellowships in the United States, the program furnishes scholars an opportunity to spend one year at the Hoover Institution to conduct independent research on current or historical public policy issues. "The National Fellows Program is an extremely important part of the fellowship at Hoover. We look forward to engaging yet another superb group of academic scholars interested in public policy issues", stated Hoover Director John Raisian.

The program is administered by Hoover Associate Director Thomas H. Henriksen, serving as the Program's Executive Secretary, assisted by Wendy S. Minkin. The 1999-2000 Fellows, their topics, and academic background are:

NATIONAL FELLOWS

Sara F. Ellison, "The Industrial Organization and Political Economy of the Pharmaceutical Industry"; Lecturer, Department of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Richard R. Geddes, "The Law and Economics of Women's Rights: International Evidence"; Associate Professor, Department of Economics, Fordham University; Ph.D., economics, University of Chicago.

Peter I. Holquist, "Making Revolution: The 'Quiet Don' in War and Revolution, 1914-1921 "; Assistant Professor, Department of History, Cornell University; Ph.D., history, Cornell University.

Wei-Yin Hu, "Minority-Owned Banks and the Financing of Minority Enterprises"; Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., economics, Stanford University.

Torben A. Iversen, "Deindustrialization, Human Capital, and the Politics of Welfare State Design"; Assistant Professor, Department of Government, Harvard University; Ph.D., political science, Duke University.

Nolan M. McCarty, "Bargaining Over Authority: Presidents, Congress, and the Separation of Powers"; Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Columbia University; Ph.D., political economy, Carnegie Mellon University.

William R. Summerhill, "Politics, Institutions, and Gradual Emancipation in Brazil"; Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., history, Stanford University.

Steven Tadelis, "Modeling the Procurement Relationship"; Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Stanford University; Ph.D., economics, Harvard University.

Michael F. Theis, "The Electoral Determinants of Legislative Organization: Japanese Committees in Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives"; Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., political science, University of California, San Diego.

Werner Troesken, "The Political Economy of Public Ownership: The Public Acquisition of Private Utility Networks, 1880-1925"; Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., economics, Washington University.

Suisheng Zhao, "In Search of Grandeur: The Construction of Nationalism in Post-Mao China"; Associate Professor, Department of Government, Washington College; Ph.D., political science, University of California, San Diego.

PEACE FELLOW

James A. Robinson, "A Political Theory of Underdevelopment"; Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Southern California; Ph.D., economics, Yale University.

Visit the Hoover Institution Web Site at www-hoover.stanford.edu.

 


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