Timothy Garton Ash, Acclaimed Scholar on Contemporary European History, Appointed Senior Fellow at Hoover Institution

Monday, September 18, 2000
STANFORD

Timothy Garton Ash, who is internationally acclaimed for his prolific, thoughtful, insightful, and vivid commentary on European affairs since the early 1980s, has been appointed a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.

Garton Ash will be in residence at Hoover on a part-year basis, while continuing his appointment as a senior research fellow in contemporary European history at the European Studies Center of St. Antony’s College at Oxford University.

“Tim’s decision to join the Hoover Institution is a coup. He is a distinguished and prolific scholar of significance,” said Hoover Institution director John Raisian. “We look forward to a long and productive relationship.”

Among his superb works are an analysis of East German totalitarianism, a study of the Polish Solidarity movement, a unique account of Czechoslovakia’s velvet revolution, led by Vaclav Havel, and a brilliant analysis of the reunification of Germany.

Garton Ash is a fellow of the European Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Royal Society of Arts. He is a governor of the Westminster Foundation for Democracy, and a member of several prestigious editorial boards. He also has received numerous honors and awards for distinguished scholarship including the Somerset Maugham Award, the Friederich Ebert Stiftung Prize, and the Knight’s Cross of the Order of Merit from the Federal Republic of Germany.

“I am delighted to be joining this great institution,” Garton Ash said.

The author of six books, including We the People: The Revolution of 1989 as Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, and Prague and In Europe’s Name: Germany and the Divided Continent, he also frequently writes for leading newspapers and magazines, and is a contributor to the New York Review of Books.

Garton Ash holds two degrees in modern history from Exeter College, Oxford, and studied at the graduate level at St. Antony’s College, at the Free University in West Berlin, and at Humboldt University in East Berlin.