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Brandon L. Wright

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Analysis and Commentary

Four Approaches To ESSA Accountability

by Michael J. Petrilli, Brandon L. Wright via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Though it sometimes appears that Education Secretary John King didn’t get the memo, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) represents a significant devolution of authority from the federal government to the states. 

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Market Malfunctions In The Charter Sector

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Brandon L. Wright via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Our first essay paid homage to chartering’s origins, a prominent strand of which was the mounting awareness that K–12 education’s “one best system” was not meeting the educational needs of every child.

Analysis and Commentary

Charter School Pluralism: "No-Excuses" And Beyond

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Brandon L. Wright via Education Gadfly (Thomas B. Fordham Institute)
Friday, June 3, 2016

Why our founding document undermines effective government—and why we need a more powerful presidency.

Analysis and Commentary

Why It's Hard To Grasp Charter School Effectiveness

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Brandon L. Wright via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Monday, May 23, 2016

Supporting charter schools requires tough love. It isn’t enough to create them and let kids attend them. They also need to be run with integrity; their books need to balance; their pupils must be safe; and above all, their academic achievement has to be strong, especially when gauged by student growth.

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Paying Homage To Charter Schools' Early Trailblazers

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Brandon L. Wright via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Next month marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the enactment of America’s first charter school law, which Minnesota Governor Arne Carlson signed on June 4, 1991. This statute birthed a sector that has become not just a source of new schools for kids who need them, but also a structural reform of public education’s governance and delivery systems. 

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America's Report Card: We're Still Ignoring Low-Income High-Achievers

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Brandon L. Wright via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Friday, April 29, 2016

Last week, the Department of Education released the 2015 Nation’s Report Card for twelfth graders. As with the fourth- and eighth-grade scores provided last fall, there was little to celebrate. In the core subjects of math and reading, average scores held firm at the same unimpressive level they’ve been at since 2009.

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Illinois Failing Its Gifted Students

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Brandon L. Wright via The State Journal-Register
Sunday, April 10, 2016

In the midst of Illinois's historic budget stalemate, funding for education and much else remains in dispute. Gov. Bruce Rauner and the legislature haven't been able to agree on major priorities, even as Chicago schools go broke and the Chicago Teachers Union looks more likely to strike every day.

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Fight for the Bright

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Brandon L. Wright via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Our highest-achieving students have needs, too—and we’re failing to meet them.

Analysis and Commentary

A Different Kind Of Lesson From Finland

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Brandon L. Wright via EducationNext
Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Finland has been lauded for years as this planet’s grand K-12 education success story, deserving of study and emulation by other nations.

Analysis and Commentary

How To Solve Scalia's Race Problem

by Brandon L. Wright , Chester E. Finn Jr.via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, December 16, 2015

During a high-visibility Supreme Court hearing last week on the Fisher v. University of Texas admissions case, Justice Scalia made some ill-considered comments on race in higher education: "There are those who contend that it does not benefit African Americans to get them into the University of Texas where they do not do well, as opposed to having them go to a less advanced school, a slower-track school where they do well."

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