David Davenport

Research Fellow
Biography: 

David Davenport is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and a visiting scholar at the Orrin G. Hatch Foundation. He specializes in constitutional federalism, civic education, modern American conservatism, and international law.

Davenport is the former president of Pepperdine University (1985–2000). Under his leadership, the university experienced significant growth in quality and reputation. Davenport cofounded Common Sense California and the Davenport Institute for Public Engagement and Civic Leadership. He also served on the board of California Forward, a major bipartisan reform group, and was a member of Governor Schwarzenegger’s California Performance Review Commission. He was a visiting fellow at the Ashbrook Center working on civic education from 2016 to 2018.

His work on policy appears in a number of places, including a regular column in the Washington Examiner and regular radio commentaries on the Salem Radio Network and Townhall.com.

He has coauthored three books with his colleague Gordon Lloyd: How Public Policy Became War (2019), Rugged Individualism: Dead or Alive? (2017), and The New Deal and Modern American Conservatism: A Defining Rivalry (2013). These books offer distinctive ways of understanding both the current and the historic debates between progressives and conservatives.  

Davenport has also contributed chapters to Hoover books on values in a free society and legal threats to American values; and has authored articles in Policy Review on “The New Diplomacy” and “The Politics of Literacy.”

Davenport earned a BA with distinction in international relations from Stanford University and a JD from the University of Kansas’s School of Law, where he was elected to Order of the Coif and earned national and international awards in moot court competitions.

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Recent Commentary

Featured

There May Not Be A Right To Civic Education, But There's Certainly A Crisis

by David Davenportvia The Washington Examiner
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

When something has been exaggerated or overdone, people often say “Don’t make a federal case out of it!” But students and parents in Rhode Island have done precisely that, taking the state and several of its officials to federal court over the failure of their schools to provide an adequate civic education. We are not taught how “to function properly as civic participants,” including voting, serving on juries and the like, say the students.

Analysis and Commentary

Davenport: The Democrat’s Dilemma: Persuasion Or Turnout

by David Davenportvia Townhall Review
Friday, July 5, 2019

Richard Nixon, who ran 5 times for president or vice president, said he ran to the right to win the Republican nomination, but then back toward the center in the general election.

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David Davenport on How Public Policy Became War

interview with David Davenportvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, June 24, 2019

AUDIO ONLY

Presidential power, and how to Make Congress Great Again (MCGA).

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David Davenport On How Public Policy Became War

interview with David Davenportvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, June 24, 2019

Presidential Power, and how to Make Congress Great Again (MCGA)

Interviews

How Public Policy Became War: David Davenport With Mark Davis

interview with David Davenportvia Townhall Review
Friday, June 21, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow David Davenport discusses his book, How Public Policy Became War.

Featured

The Democrats' 2020 Dilemma: Rally Base Or Persuade Moderates?

by David Davenportvia The Washington Examiner
Friday, June 21, 2019
Richard Nixon, who tied Franklin Roosevelt’s record by running on a national presidential ticket five times, said that he ran to the right to win the Republican nomination but then ran back toward the center in the general election. In the 2004 presidential campaign, however, President George W. Bush and Karl Rove found a new path to electoral victory by turning out their base rather than attracting the undecided.
Analysis and Commentary

The Democrats' 2020 Dilemma: Rally Base Or Persuade Moderates?

by David Davenportvia The Washington Examiner
Friday, June 21, 2019

Richard Nixon, who tied Franklin Roosevelt’s record by running on a national presidential ticket five times, said that he ran to the right to win the Republican nomination but then ran back toward the center in the general election. In the 2004 presidential campaign, however, President George W. Bush and Karl Rove found a new path to electoral victory by turning out their base rather than attracting the undecided.

Democrat's Donkey
Analysis and Commentary

David Davenport: The Democrats’ Dilemma: Principle Or Politics?

by David Davenportvia Townhall Review
Monday, June 17, 2019

With over 20 Democrats announcing 2020 presidential bids, the campaign reflects the chaos of a NASCAR race. But already there is one defining separation in the pack: Will Democrats steer hard left with Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren or Kamala Harris, or center-left with Joe Biden?

Interviews

David Davenport: Make Congress Great Again!

interview with David Davenportvia Talk 650 KSTE
Friday, June 7, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow David Davenport discusses how one president managed to completely transform the way in which our government works, and how we can "Make Congress Great Again."

Analysis and Commentary

David Davenport: The Deceptive Popular Vote Bill Gains Momentum

by David Davenportvia Town Hall Review
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Democrats, angry about losing the presidency twice in the Electoral College since 2000, are quietly taking action. The National Popular Vote Bill passed in three more states—Colorado, Delaware and New Mexico—this Spring and recently passed state senates in two more.

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