James Goldgeier is a W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell National Fellow and the Edward Teller National Fellow at the Hoover Institution.

James M. Goldgeier

Biography: 

James Goldgeier was a W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell National Fellow for 2007–2008 at the Hoover Institution and the 2008–09 Edward Teller National Fellow at the Hoover Institution.

He is also a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University. His research focuses on American foreign policy, and he is currently writing a monograph on the future of NATO.

Previous experiences include teaching at Cornell University, serving at the State Department and on the National Security Council staff, and holding the Henry A. Kissinger Chair at the Library of Congress. He has authored or coauthored four books on foreign policy; his most recent (coauthored with Derek Chollet) is America Between the Wars: From 11/9 to 9/11 (PublicAffairs 2008), named “a best book of 2008” by Slate and “a favorite book of 2008” by The Daily Beast.

Goldgeier holds an AB from Harvard and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Recent Commentary

A Realistic Reset with Russia

by James M. Goldgeiervia Policy Review
Monday, August 3, 2009

Practical expectations for U.S.-Russian relations

Russia's No Democracy? So What?

by Michael McFaul, James M. Goldgeiervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, July 30, 2006

Vladimir Putin's autocratic regime is bad news...for Russia and the United States. By Michael McFaul and James Goldgeier.

What To Do About Russia

by Michael McFaul, James M. Goldgeiervia Policy Review
Saturday, October 1, 2005

Engage the government and aid the democrats

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Putin’s Authoritarian Soul

by Michael McFaul, James M. Goldgeiervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, April 30, 2005

The first test for George W. Bush’s liberty doctrine. By James M. Goldgeier and Michael McFaul.

The United States and Russia

by James M. Goldgeiervia Policy Review
Monday, October 1, 2001

Keeping expectations realistic