Laura E. Huggins

Biography: 

Laura E. Huggins was a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

Huggins specializes in free market environmentalism, property rights, and population policy. She is primarily interested in the role of economic processes in shaping natural resource policy and in promoting market principles to a wide audience to help resolve environmental dilemmas.

Huggins is the author, along with Hoover Institution senior fellow Terry Anderson, of Property Rights: A Practical Guide to Freedom and Prosperity (2003) and Greener Than Thou: Are You Really an Environmentalist? (2008). She also edited Accounting for Mother Nature (2008), Population Puzzle: Boom or Bust? (2004), and Drug War Deadlock: The Policy Battle Continues (2005). She is currently focusing on a forthcoming monograph tentatively titled Environmental Entrepreneurship in the Developing World.

Huggins’s articles have appeared in the Los Angeles Times and Washington Times; her published papers include "A Property Rights Path to Sustainable Development," which appeared in The Legacy of Milton and Rose Friedman's Free to Choose: Economic Liberalism at the Turn of the 21st Century.

Huggins holds an MS degree in public policy from Utah State University.

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Recent Commentary

Crying Over Spilled Milk

by Laura E. Hugginsvia Advancing a Free Society
Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Despite the old saying, “Don’t cry over spilled milk,” the Environmental Protection Agency is doing just that, says Thomas Sowell.

Climate Armageddon?

by Laura E. Hugginsvia Advancing a Free Society
Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Some climate scientists and environmental activists might have you thinking we are living in the Time of the End. But be leery of false prophecies.

Mixing Oil and Birds

by Laura E. Hugginsvia Advancing a Free Society
Thursday, December 9, 2010

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and, as has often been the case throughout its history, it has stirred up political conflicts over its use.

Will the West’s “Water Woes” lead to more flows?

by Laura E. Hugginsvia Advancing a Free Society
Tuesday, November 2, 2010

For those of us living in the West, it’s a no-brainer that water is more valuable than gold. But if it’s so valuable then why isn’t it trading in a similar fashion to gold? Short answer: a maze of institutional barriers.

Analysis and Commentary

Will the West’s “Water Woes” lead to more flows?

by Laura E. Huggins with Gary D. Libecapvia Percolator (PERC)
Monday, November 1, 2010

For those of us living in the West, it’s a no-brainer that water is more valuable than gold. But if it’s so valuable then why isn’t it trading in a similar fashion to gold? Short answer: a maze of institutional barriers...

Market solutions for national parks

by Laura E. Hugginsvia Advancing a Free Society
Thursday, October 21, 2010

Ken Burns makes amazing documentaries, but even more amazing is that the Oct.

Analysis and Commentary

Market solutions for national parks

by Laura E. Hugginsvia Los Angeles Times
Thursday, October 21, 2010

Contracting out concessions and creating more partnerships with private research firms are just a few ways our national parks can boost revenue and attract more visitors...

Analysis and Commentary

Earth Day: 40 years of imminent catastrophe

by Laura E. Hugginsvia Philadelphia Inquirer
Thursday, April 22, 2010

The truth is that there's much to celebrate this Earth Day. One reason to rejoice is that the doomsters have been wrong for 40 years, and they will likely be wrong again...

Earth Day: 40 years of imminent catastrophe

by Laura E. Hugginsvia Advancing a Free Society
Thursday, April 22, 2010

On this 40th anniversary of Earth Day, prepare to be bombarded with apocalyptic tales of disaster. But don't let the gloom-and-doom-fest get you down. Odds are the doomsters will be wrong.

Analysis and Commentary

Schools’ eco-propaganda doesn’t teach kids to think

by Laura E. Hugginsvia Buffalo News
Monday, September 28, 2009

It’s back to school—the time of year when the cool autumn air rolls in, crisp apples fall from the trees and my 5-year-old daughter comes home from school asking...

Pages