Morris P. Fiorina

Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
American Academy of Political and Social Science
National Academy of Sciences
Biography: 

Morris P. Fiorina is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Wendt Family Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. His current research focuses on elections and public opinion with particular attention to the quality of representation: how well the positions of elected officials reflect the preferences of the public.

During the course of his forty-year career Fiorina has published numerous articles and books on national politics including Congress—Keystone of the Washington Establishment (Yale University Press, 1977), Retrospective Voting in American National Elections (Yale University Press, 1981), and Divided Government (Allyn & Bacon, 1992). The Personal Vote: Constituency Service and Electoral Independence, coauthored with Bruce Cain and John Ferejohn (Harvard University Press, 1987), won the 1988 Richard F. Fenno Prize. He is also coeditor of Continuity and Change in House Elections (Stanford University Press and Hoover Press, 2000). The third edition of his 2004 groundbreaking book Culture War: The Myth of a Polarized America (with Samuel J. Abrams and Jeremy C. Pope) was published in 2011. He coedited Can We Talk? The Rise of Rude, Nasty, Stubborn Politics (Pearson, 2013). Most recently he published Unstable Majorities (Hoover, 2017). 

Fiorina has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. He has served on the editorial boards of more than a dozen journals on political science, law, political economy, and public policy. From 1986 to 1990 he was chairman of the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies.

Fiorina received his BA degree from Allegheny College and his MA and PhD from the University of Rochester. He lives in Portola Valley, California.

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Recent Commentary

Morris P. Fiorina

Morris Fiorina on polarization, stability, and the state of the electorate

by Russell Roberts, Morris P. Fiorinavia EconTalk
Monday, July 8, 2013

In this podcast Russell Roberts, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and EconTalk host, talks with Morris Fiorina, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Wendt Family Professor of Political Science at Stanford University, about the state of the US electorate and recent election results. Fiorina argues that, although the Republican and Democratic Parties are more extreme than in the past, there has been only modest change in the character of the US electorate.

Morris P. Fiorina

Fiorina discusses his book Culture War? on C-SPAN’s BookTV

by Morris P. Fiorinavia C-Span2 Book TV
Monday, June 24, 2013

Morris Fiorina, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Wendt Family Professor of Political Science at Stanford University, argues that Americans are far less polarized than the media and political pundits would have you believe.

Obama vs Romney

How Do You Like Me Now?

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 26, 2012

Time to bust another political myth: that the “likable” candidate always wins. By Morris P. Fiorina.

Analysis and Commentary

Is Mitt Romney Likable Enough?

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Defining Ideas (Hoover Institution)
Friday, October 19, 2012
an image

Is Mitt Romney Likable Enough?

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Defining Ideas
Friday, October 19, 2012

Despite what the chattering classes say, likability plays a minor role in deciding modern presidential elections.

man leaves voting booth

The Myth of the "Big Sort"

by Samuel J. Abrams, Morris P. Fiorinavia Hoover Digest
Monday, August 13, 2012

In the information age, Americans’ political allegiances go far beyond their neighborhoods. By Samuel J. Abrams and Morris P. Fiorina.

Analysis and Commentary

‘You’re Likable Enough, Mitt.’

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Campaign Stops (New York Times)
Thursday, June 7, 2012

Recent political commentary contrasts Mitt Romney’s negative personal image with President Obama’s positive one. Polls report that Obama is more “likable” than Romney, and that his “favorable to unfavorable” ratio is more positive...

Analysis and Commentary

Data Matters: Keeping the Horse Race in Perspective

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Advancing a Free Society
Thursday, May 24, 2012

Professor Fiorina has gathered polling data from the Gallup Trial Heats in presidential elections that show how the early polling can be wide of the Election Day mark...

In the News

“The Big Sort” That Wasn't: A Skeptical Reexamination

by Samuel J. Abrams, Morris P. Fiorinavia PS: Political Science & Politics (University of Cambridge)
Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Despite the opinions of various reviewers on the Amazon. com website and in the popular media that The Big Sort is thorough, systematic, and well-researched, most academic researchers would conclude the opposite...

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