Tod Lindberg

Research Team: 
Biography: 

Tod Lindberg was a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He writes widely on U.S. foreign policy and national security, as well as on American politics and philosophical topics. His main policy focus in recent years has been on improving international cooperation for the prevention of genocide and mass atrocities.

Lindberg is the author of The Heroic Heart: Greatness Ancient and Modern (Encounter Books, 2015), a philosophical investigation of changing ideas about heroism and its connection to political order and change, and The Political Teachings of Jesus, a philosophical study of Jesus’s Gospel teaching about worldly affairs (HarperCollins, 2007; paperback edition, HarperOne, 2008). He is co-author with Lee Feinstein of Means to an End: U.S. Interest in the International Criminal Court (Brookings Press, 2009). He is the editor of Beyond Paradise and Power: Europe, America and the Future of a Troubled Partnership (Routledge, 2005) and co-editor with Derek Chollet and David Shorr of Bridging the Foreign Policy Divide (Routledge, 2007).

He is a contributing editor to the Weekly Standard and has written for scholarly and  popular publications from Telos and the Review of Metaphysics to the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal and USA Today. He is adjunct associate professor at Georgetown University’s Walsh School of Foreign Service, where he teaches a graduate course on ethics and decision-making in international politics.

From 1999 until 2013, he was editor of Policy Review. Previously, he served in senior editorial positions at the Washington Times and was the founding executive editor of the National Interest and an editor at the Public Interest.

More recently, Lindberg served as lead of the expert group on international norms and institutions of the 2008 Genocide Prevention Task Force convened by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and co-chaired by Madeleine Albright and William Cohen. He also served as coordinator for the task group on Preventing and Responding to Genocide and Major Human Rights Abuses for the United States Institute of Peace’s 2005 Task Force on the United Nations (the Gingrich-Mitchell task force). He is a member of the American Bar Association’s Working Group on Crimes against Humanity. He is currently working with his long-time collaborator Lee Feinstein on a major report for the Holocaust Museum on transatlantic cooperation on atrocity prevention.

Lindberg is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Advisory Council of the Stanley Foundation, and the Advisory Board of the Chicago Council Survey.

He studied political philosophy at the University of Chicago with Allan Bloom and Saul Bellow, among others. He and his wife Tina live in Washington, D.C., and Palo Alto, California. They have two grown daughters.

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Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

Questions and the sixth-year rule

by Tod Lindbergvia Washington Times
Tuesday, November 14, 2006

Generally speaking, elections are about comparative judgments...

Analysis and Commentary

Predictions no more

by Tod Lindbergvia Washington Times
Tuesday, November 7, 2006

Beginning a little less than a year ago, Democrats set expectations for today's elections at levels ranging from high to highest: They were going to win back control of the House for the first time since 1995 and the Senate as well....

Analysis and Commentary

Not-so-great political expectations

by Tod Lindbergvia Washington Times
Tuesday, October 31, 2006

Here's an observation for one week before the midterm: Throughout the Bush administration, Democrats have generally believed that they are poised on the brink of victory...

Analysis and Commentary

Bush and his conjurings

by Tod Lindbergvia Washington Times
Tuesday, October 17, 2006

There was one consistently amusing poll question asked in the run-up to the 2004 presidential primary season…

Analysis and Commentary

Midterm toss-up

by Tod Lindbergvia Washington Times
Tuesday, October 10, 2006

If I had to sum up the conventional wisdom a month before the congressional elections, it would be this: If Democrats can't win control of the House this year, they really are lame...

Analysis and Commentary

Republicans and the midterm

by Tod Lindbergvia Washington Times
Tuesday, October 3, 2006

When Karl Rove relinquished the position of deputy White House chief of staff earlier this year, supposedly in order to concentrate full-time on retaining the Republican majority in this year's congressional elections, the most prevalent Washington reaction was that the move constituted a demotion...

Analysis and Commentary

More than pork and rubber

by Tod Lindbergvia Washington Times
Tuesday, September 26, 2006

Every so often I retreat to the privacy of my cerebrum to debate the following proposition: Resolved, that the sole reason the United States remains democratic in character at the national level is the election of its president every four years, the Congress of the United States having become a dysfunctional and decadent institution...

Analysis and Commentary

Darfurians in crosshairs

by Tod Lindbergvia Washington Times
Tuesday, September 19, 2006

Just about a year ago at the United Nations, leaders at the world summit embraced a principle that amounts to a revolution in moral consciousness, the "responsibility to protect...

Analysis and Commentary

Then, now and beyond

by Tod Lindbergvia Washington Times
Tuesday, September 12, 2006

We are all Americans,"Nous sommestous Americains," was the headline in France's Le Monde five years ago today, as the world began to take stock of the shocking attack the day before...

Analysis and Commentary

Looking back to 9/11

by Tod Lindbergvia Washington Times
Tuesday, September 5, 2006

Suppose, five years after September 11, 2001, you had to assign yourself a single adjective to describe how you feel and what you think in relation to the events of that day...

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