The Caravan
Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Issue 1306

The Egyptian Military Coup
Introduction
Introduction

The Egyptian Coup: Deliverance or the Past Again?

by Fouad Ajamivia The Caravan
Wednesday, July 24, 2013

There was an Egyptian coup d’état this July, and there was another one, on July 23, 1952.  The earlier one begot a military regime that remained in the saddle for six decades.  It came in the “nick of time,” a renowned historian of Egypt, the late Harvard scholar Nadav Safran, wrote in his seminal Egypt in Search of Political Community (1961).  There was political chaos in the land, a feeble and corrupt monarchy, extremist political parties bereft of wisdom and practicality.

Featured Analysis
The Arab Spring in Egypt
Featured Analysis

Egyptomania

by Charles Hillvia The Caravan
Wednesday, July 24, 2013

To the American imagination over more than two centuries, some nations have seemed more “real” than others – and it is in fact true that a few states in today’s international world convey a seemingly eternal essence while most are ordinary modern creatures.

Featured Analysis

U.S. Policy, Egypt and the Democracy Movement

by Russell A. Bermanvia The Caravan
Friday, July 26, 2013

A wave of change is sweeping the Middle East, but the foreign policy of the Obama administration has failed to meet the challenge. In case after case, Washington has refused to confront repressive regimes and given short shrift to popular movements for democracy.

Featured Analysis

The Regional Ramifications of Morsi's Removal from Power

by Itamar Rabinovichvia The Caravan
Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Morsi's removal from power and the exacerbation of the conflict over Egypt's identity and political future add yet another compounding element to the murky arena of Middle Eastern regional politics.

Featured Analysis

An Islamist Moment?

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia The Caravan
Monday, August 5, 2013

Fifty years ago, the historian Elizabeth Monroe published a beautifully written book with a dismissive title:  Britain’s Moment in the Middle East, 1914-1956.  Although one can quibble with the description—the British impact in the region really should be clocked from A

Featured Analysis

Pity Egypt, It Has No Liberals

by Samuel Tadrosvia The Caravan
Friday, August 2, 2013

What happened to Egypt’s liberals? Jackson Diehl’s question in the Washington Post is not a new one. In the aftermath of the Egyptian revolution and as Islamists swept every electoral competition, the question was being sincerely posed.

Featured Analysis

A Coup is a Coup is a Coup

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Caravan
Monday, July 29, 2013

You know a country is benighted when no less a figure than Tony Blair, the world’s official envoy for the Middle East (whatever that means), turns apologist for a coup d’état, stating blithely that the army had no choice but to unseat the elected president.

Featured Analysis

The Great Schism

by Fouad Ajamivia The Caravan
Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Grant Egypt its redeeming consolations: it is neither Algeria, nor Syria.  The terror that came to Algeria in the 1990s, a scorched earth war between Le Pouvoir (The Power Structure) and the Islamists which took a toll of no les