The Caravan
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Issue 2130

Human Rights in the Middle East and American Foreign Policy
Introduction
Introduction

The West And The World

by Charles Hillvia The Caravan
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

The idea of “Human Rights” is modern.  Humanity’s history only recently has recognized the need for such a category, and a concomitant need to explain what the category covers and where it comes from.

Featured Analysis
Featured Analysis

Don’t Let Iran’s Human Rights Be Sacrificed At The Altar Of A Nuclear Deal

by Wang Xiyuevia The Caravan
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

The Islamic Republic of Iran remains one of the world’s worst human right abusers: it has the highest executions per capita; it constantly crushes peaceful assembly and freedom of expression; and it harshly persecutes human rights defenders and civil society activists.

Featured Analysis

Without Human Rights, Any Biden Deal With Iran Will Be Ephemeral

by Masih Alinejad, Kambiz Forooharvia The Caravan
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

It has been a tough few months for human rights in Iran. Wrestler Navid Afkari and laborer Mostafa Salehi were executed in quick succession for participating in public protests against the Islamic Republic.

Featured Analysis

Partner Or Pariah? Saudi Arabia, The Biden Administration, And Human Rights

by Cole Bunzelvia The Caravan
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

The Biden administration has set for itself an ambitious human rights agenda. “When I am president, human rights will be at the core of U.S. foreign policy,” then candidate Joe Biden told the New York Times in February 2020, citing “China’s deepening authoritarianism” and “the unconscionable detention of over a million Uighurs in western China.”

Featured Analysis

Human Rights & Diplomacy: “Give Us Something To Aspire To!”

by Eric K. Lundbergvia The Caravan
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

The gap between aspiration and achievement in human rights promotion is a long-standing feature of U.S. foreign policy. We Foreign Service Officers learn early that, however genuine our intentions, there are natural limits to what is achievable.

Featured Analysis

Beyond Persecution: Why The Biden Administration Should Support An Agreement Between KNC And PYD

by Eva Savelsbergvia The Caravan
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

In April 2020, the US Department of State decided to support the opening of a dialogue between the Kurdish National Council (KNC), an umbrella organization of Syrian-Kurdish political parties close to the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) of Massoud Barzani, and the Democratic Unity Party (PYD), the Syrian branch of the PKK (Kurdistan Worker’s Party).

Featured Analysis

Egypt's Reckoning

by Samuel Tadrosvia The Caravan
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

As a young man, Egypt’s legendary playwright, Tawfiq Al Hakim had worked as an assistant to the Attorney General in the Egyptian countryside. There he would witness firsthand the dismal state of the country’s fellahin and the grave injustices Egypt’s rural population lived under. The experience would leave a profound impact on the young author and would shape his views of Egypt’s ills and the necessity for social change that became evident in his literary works. 

Featured Analysis

Saudi Human Rights

by Karen Elliott Housevia The Caravan
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

If the Biden Administration lives up to its campaign promises and early governing pronouncements, human rights will play a larger role in its foreign policy than in that of the Trump Administration.  This isn’t necessarily good news.

Featured Analysis

Promoting Human Rights Abroad, Defending Them At Home

by Russell A. Bermanvia The Caravan
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

An American foreign policy that includes the promotion of human rights as one of its missions can draw on a tradition rooted in the Declaration of Independence. The assertion of universal equality and the designation of unalienable rights, "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness," have shaped American political culture. That the reality of American life has never fully realized these ideals and at times failed them egregiously, notably in the institution of slavery, does not negate the validity of the ideals themselves.