The Caravan
Tuesday, June 21, 2022

Issue 2235

The End of the American Era in the Gulf?
Featured Analysis
Featured Analysis

The Biden Administration’s Saudi Climbdown: The Failure Of Recalibration

by Cole Bunzelvia The Caravan
Tuesday, June 21, 2022

It is no secret that the United States’ relations with its Gulf Arab partners have suffered greatly under the first year and a half of the Biden administration.

Featured Analysis

Fixing Washington’s Gulf Rift

by David Schenkervia The Caravan
Tuesday, June 21, 2022

During his first Inaugural address, President Biden pledged to “repair our alliances” and to be “a strong and trusted partner for peace, progress, and security.” A year into the Administration, Biden deserves credit for rallying a diminished NATO to face the challenge posed by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and continuing to rally Indo-Pacific partners to counter the threat posed by China. Elsewhere, however, the Administration’s alliance management has been decidedly less successful.

Featured Analysis

The Abraham Accords And The Changing Shape Of The Middle East

by Dennis Rossvia The Caravan
Tuesday, June 21, 2022

One question I often get is how are the Abraham Accords changing the Middle East? It is a fair and logical question, but there is a more important one to ask: how did the region change so the Abraham Accords became possible? And, what does that change tell us about where the region is headed?

Featured Analysis

Resetting US-Gulf Ties

by Sanam Vakilvia The Caravan
Tuesday, June 21, 2022

Tensions between the Biden administration and its traditional Gulf partners, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi Arabia, have been brought to a head over shifting U.S. priorities and commitments to Gulf security. Over the course of three U.S. administrations, Washington has sought to prioritize geopolitical challenges with Russia and China, forcing a course correction on its investments in the Middle East.

Featured Analysis

The Future of the Quad: The Importance of Calibrated Expectations

by Eyck Freymannvia The Caravan
Tuesday, June 21, 2022

In the past three years, the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue (Quad) of the United States, Japan, Australia, and India has emerged as the most important geopolitical grouping in global politics. Initiated in 2007, by former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, the partnership has expanded from a single dimension of cooperation—the Malabar joint military exercises—to a range of dimensions, including digital standards, public health, and infrastructure finance.

Featured Analysis

Back to the Future: US Navy Involvement in Middle East Security

by Jerry Hendrixvia The Caravan
Tuesday, June 21, 2022

When he departed the region for the last time in 1951, US Navy Captain Ernest Eller, who later in life became known as one of the Navy’s great historians, wrote the Chief of Naval Operations, “Great nations are stirring, and great events are shaping up in this part of the world. I hope the United States will comprehend them and will be equal to the opportunity.” Recent events raise more than a few questions as to whether Captain Eller’s hopes have been fulfilled or dashed.

Featured Analysis

How to Move the US-Saudi Relationship Beyond the Transactional and Personal

by Bernard Haykelvia The Caravan
Tuesday, June 21, 2022

The US relationship with Saudi Arabia is at an all-time low. Without significant and timely course corrections, the damage to America’s interests could be severe. Parties on both sides have acknowledged this, including the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, Muhammad bin Salman (MBS). The latter has expressed exasperation with what he considers a dithering American foreign policy that he has compared unfavorably to that of the United Kingdom, France and China.

Featured Analysis

The U.S. in the Gulf: Threats and Prospects

by Russell A. Bermanvia The Caravan
Tuesday, June 21, 2022

For decades the United States has served as the foundation of the security architecture in the Gulf as well as for a network of allies in the broader Middle East. It is more likely than not that the U.S. will continue to do so. Pessimistic predictions of an end of the American era in the Gulf are mistaken. To be sure, we currently face some significant irritations in bilateral relations, notably with Saudi Arabia and the UAE, but these are best understood as part of the inevitable ups and downs in any partnership.